How do I set up eclipse CDT with existing IDE compiler.

This is a discussion on How do I set up eclipse CDT with existing IDE compiler. within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; Let's say I installed an IDE like Code::Blocks and it includes the compiler with it, after I install CDT how ...

  1. #1
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    How do I set up eclipse CDT with existing IDE compiler.

    Let's say I installed an IDE like Code::Blocks and it includes the compiler with it, after I install CDT how do I configure it to use the gcc, gdb, etc that came packed with Code::blocks? Do I still need Msys?

  2. #2
    {Jaxom,Imriel,Liam}'s Dad Kennedy's Avatar
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    It _should_ work out-of-the-box. Perhaps you need to reinstall?

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    well the thing is the gcc compiler that comes with code::blocks doesn't register with windows, so CDT doesn't pick it up. I'm trying to find the way to set it ups so I can point eclipse to the path of the bin to create the binary. My other computer has it set up fine, but I used mingw and msys, but I don't have that where I am.

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    Cant you place the path to the gcc binary in the system path?
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    In CDT's system path? I don't know, I just installed the Code::Blocks Nightly build so I don't mind, as long as it works at my home I'm good. Eclipse debugger is much better than code::blocks.

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    Frequently Quite Prolix dwks's Avatar
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    I don't know how Eclipse works, but if it just adds its compiler to the path, you could move Code::Block's path before Eclipse's.

    You could do this by editing \autoexec.bat, or (for Windows XP), something in the Control Panel.

    From the "Update the PATH variable in Windows -> Windows NT, Windows 2000, and Windows XP - To set the PATH permanently" section of this page: http://www.apl.jhu.edu/~hall/java/be...settingup.html
    Choose Start, Settings, Control Panel, and double-click System. On Windows NT, select the Environment tab; on Windows 2000 select the Advanced tab and then Environment Variables. Look for "Path" in the User Variables and System Variables. If you're not sure where to add the path, add it to the right end of the "Path" in the User Variables. A typical value for PATH is:

    C:\j2sdk1.4.1\bin
    Capitalization doesn't matter. Click "Set", "OK" or "Apply".

    The PATH can be a series of directories separated by semi-colons (. Microsoft Windows looks for programs in the PATH directories in order, from left to right. You should only have one <b>bin directory for a Java SDK in the path at a time (those following the first are ignored), so if one is already present, you can update it to j2sdk1.4.1.

    The new path takes effect in each new Command Prompt window you open after setting the PATH variable.
    I know you're not using Java, but that's what I found when I searched.
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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    > Eclipse debugger is much better than code::blocks.

    I assume you mean the debugger UI.
    Regardless, you want to really debug? I mean like... really debug?

    Then UIs are not for you. Do it on gdb's shell.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    I can barely change directories in the command line, let alone compile or debug anything with it.

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    Why not? Change to the directory (cd), then run the command. If you need any help, check out the man page for the command you're using.
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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    an excellent source to learn how to debug in the gdb shell: http://www.gnu.org/software/gdb/documentation/

    Don't take me wrong. This isn't your typical RTFM reply. It just happens that the gdb manual is definitely the source. Really, with a manual like that there's no need for tutorials or books.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    I'll have to check that out sometime, too kme all day figuring out how to manually install the different mingw parts.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    For that check the MinGW wiki at http://www.mingw.org/MinGWiki/.

    You are after the Getting Started section.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    well I got it working, but it's just weird, I'm used to "all in one" type of things. THese gzip and different types are just annoying, plus they don't tell you what they all are for. But yeah I didn't see that one first, I just downloaded the pack of them.

  14. #14
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Well, it has its disadvantages and advantages. For starters, you can always do a fresh installation with the installer package (http://downloads.sourceforge.net/min...1&big_mirror=1)
    However it apparently doesn't work for everyone, for some reason. (I never tried it)

    The big advantage is that once you know what packages you need, and install the latest versions (see below), you won't need to install the whole thing again just to make a small update. The MinGW team issues updates to these packages (two important ones just occurred a few days ago) and you simply keep an eye on the website news bar to the right and download them. They are remarkably easy to install. Just unpacking them to the mingw root folder replacing existing files.

    Anyways, for what you shall have (latest version), see image attached.

    And you also need the latest gdb: gdb-6.3-2.exe (don't forget documentation)

    I also once found useful a port of the gnu fileutils to mingw: fileutils316-ming.tar.bz2
    you can find this one at: http://jrfonseca.planetaclix.pt/proj...ted/index.html
    Just dump them onto your mingw bin folder. You can skip the included sources.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    I won't need that for a while, thanks for putting it in perspective though. The main reason I stayed away from doing all the stuff manually is that sifting through pages of text and explanations is hard enough for me, then on top of that I have to remember what I'm downloading. I think I get it know, and see why it's easier this way.

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