Quick question...

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  1. #1
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    Quick question...

    What is the largest value you can represent using a 256-bit unsigned integer? unsigned means non-negative correct?

  2. #2
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    1.1579208923731619542357098500869e+77
    Next time, get your calculator out and figure it out for yourself,#
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salem
    1.1579208923731619542357098500869e+77
    Next time, get your calculator out and figure it out for yourself,#
    I would if I knew how hence me having to ask. How did you do that?

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    Registered User Tonto's Avatar
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    A 256 bit data type There is currently no such thing. Most compilers support a 64 bit data type (long long or __int64). But a 256 bit data could have a range of approximately 1.1579208923731619542357098500869e+77 And yes, that is what unsigned means. Edit: 2 ^ 256. Not the XOR, the exponent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tonto
    A 256 bit data type There is currently no such thing. Most compilers support a 64 bit data type (long long or __int64). But a 256 bit data could have a range of approximately 1.1579208923731619542357098500869e+77 And yes, that is what unsigned means. Edit: 2 ^ 256. Not the XOR, the exponent.
    Oh I get it now. But would it not be 2^256 - 1?

  6. #6
    Code Goddess Prelude's Avatar
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    >How did you do that?
    Assuming the Windows calculator, enter 2, then choose the x^y button, then enter 256 and hit the = button.
    My best code is written with the delete key.

  7. #7
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    Betcha-you-have-to-explain-how-to-get-from-basic-to-scientific-mode
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
    I support http://www.ukip.org/ as the first necessary step to a free Europe.

  8. #8
    C++ Developer XSquared's Avatar
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    Or, if you want the exact value:

    11579208923731619542357098500868790785326998466564 0564039457584007913129639935
    Last edited by XSquared; 08-04-2006 at 01:32 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salem
    Betcha-you-have-to-explain-how-to-get-from-basic-to-scientific-mode
    Wow. A little harsh don't ya think. We all have to start somewere. I more so was looking for help with the theory behind it.

    Thanks for the help though,

    Chad

  10. #10
    Useless Apprentice ryan_germain's Avatar
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    yes it should be 2^256 - 1 as the max value or 2^256 combinations
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