Is this processor 64-bit?

This is a discussion on Is this processor 64-bit? within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; I ran FreshDiagnose on a computer, and I can't tell if it supports 64-bit instructions. It says the data bus ...

  1. #1
    Chad Johnson
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    May 2004
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    Is this processor 64-bit?

    I ran FreshDiagnose on a computer, and I can't tell if it supports 64-bit instructions. It says the data bus width is 64-bit, but I'm not sure what that means. Here is the output.

    Code:
    Processor
    This module contains information about your computer's central processor(s) and its capabilities.
    
    
                                              
    Processor                                 
    Model                                     Intel Pentium 4
    Type                                      Primary Processor
    Vendor                                    Intel Corporation
    Family                                    Intel P4 Family
    Hardcoded Name                            Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU 3.00GHz
    Frequency                                 2992 MHz
    Family/Model/Stepping                     15/4/3
    Logical CPU Count                         2
    Apic ID                                   6
    CL Flush                                  8
                                              
    Detailed Info                             
    Address Bus Width                         36 Bit
    Core Details                              126 µOPs, 48 Loads, 24 Stores In-Flight
    Data Bus Width                            64 Bit
    Execution Speed                           Up to 6 µOPs/Cycle
    Execution Units                           Double-pumped ALU, FP Move/Store/FXCH, Double-pumped ALU,
                                              Slow ALU, FP Execute, Load, Store
    Floating Point                            Integrated
    Instruction Decoder                       1x IA-32/Cycle
    Instruction Set                           IA-32
    Multimedia                                MMX, SSE, SSE2
    Multiprocessing                           SMP, using integrated local xAPICs
    Physical Memory                           2^36 Bit (64 GB)
    Pipeline Depth                            20 Stages
    Power Management                          HLT, STPCLK, SMI/SMM, Sleep, Deep Sleep,
                                              Automatic Clock Throttling
    Processor Core                            RISC, Out-of-order and Speculative Execution
    Processor Modes                           Real, Protected, Virtual, Paging, SMM, Probe Mode
    Registers                                 32 Bit Integer, 80 Bit FP, 64 Bit MM, 128 Bit SSE and SSE2
    Split Voltage                             Yes (Automatically determined via VID Pins)
    Supported External Bus Speed              100, 133 MHz Quad-Pumped, AGTL+
    Supported Multiplier                      13.0x, 14.0x, ..., 24.0x
    Virtual Memory                            65,528 GB (~64 TB)
                                              
    Cache Configuration                       
    L1 Code TLB                               4 KB pages, 4-way set associative, 32 entries
                                              4 KB/4 MB/2 MB pages, fully associative, 64 entries
    L1 Data TLB                               4 KB/4 MB pages, fully associative, 64 entries
    L2 Cache                                  None
    Trace L1 Cache                            12 KµOPs, 8-way set associative
                                              
    Processor Features                        
    Floating-point Unit on chip (FPU)         Yes
    MMX Instructions (MMX)                    Yes
    MMX Instruction Extensions (MMX+)         No
    3DNow! Instructions                       No
    3DNow! Instruction Extensions (3DNow!+)   No
    Streaming SIMD Extensions (SSE)           Yes
    Streaming SIMD Extensions 2 (SSE2)        Yes
    Multiprocessor Capable                    No
    x86-64 Long Mode (LM)                     Yes
    Virtual Mode Extension (VME)              Yes
    Debugging Extension (DE)                  Yes
    Page Size Extension (PSE)                 Yes
    Time Stamp Counter (TSC)                  Yes
    Model Specific Registers (MSR)            Yes
    Physical Address Extension (PAE)          Yes
    Machine Check Exception (MCE)             Yes
    CMPXCHG8 Instruction (CX8)                Yes
    On-chip APIC Hardware (APIC)              Yes
    Fast System Call (SEP)                    Yes
    Memory Type Range Registers (MTRR)        Yes
    Page Global Enable (PGE)                  Yes
    Machine Check Architecture (MCA)          Yes
    Conditional Move Instruction (CMOV)       Yes
    Page Attribute Table (PAT)                Yes
    36-bit Page Size Extension (PSE36)        Yes
    96-bit Processor Number (PSN)             No
    CLFLUSH Instruction (CLFSH)               Yes
    Debug Trace Store (DTS)                   Yes
    ACPI Supported (ACPI)                     Yes
    Fast Save and Restore (FXSR)              Yes
    Self Snoop (SS)                           Yes
    Thermal Monitor Supported (TM)            Yes
    IA-64 Processor Capable (IA-64)           No

  2. #2
    Chad Johnson
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    Sorry, didn't mean to post twice.

  3. #3
    Registered User
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    This tells me it's 32-bit:

    Instruction Set IA-32
    IA-64 Processor Capable (IA-64) No

    But usually what I do, is write a c program like this, if ptr size is 8, then you have 64-bit processor:

    Code:
    int main()
    {
        printf("Ptr size: %d\n", sizeof(void*));
        return 0;
    }
    The crows maintain that a single crow could destroy the heavens. Doubtless this is so. But it proves nothing against the heavens, for the heavens signify simply: the impossibility of crows.

  4. #4
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    Address Bus Width 36 Bit
    This is indicative of it being a 32-bit CPU. (32-bit direct addressing, 4-bit segment addressing)

    IA-64 Processor Capable (IA-64) No
    This merely means it's not an IA-64 CPU - but it could be an EM-64T CPU.

    x86-64 Long Mode (LM) Yes
    This is what confuses me. I'm not sure what Long Mode is, but x86-64 is the AMD 64-bit system, EM-64T for Intels.

    Registers 32 Bit Integer
    Another clue to it being 32-bit.

    Instruction Decoder 1x IA-32/Cycle
    Instruction Set IA-32
    No mention of EM-64T.

    In conclusion: it's definitely not an Itanium (IA-64), but you knew that: it's a Xeon, after all.
    To the best of my knowledge, there aren't any 64-bit Xeons clocked at 3.0 GHz - I believe they start at about 3.5 GHz.
    I'm pretty sure it's a normal 32-bit CPU.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  5. #5
    and the Hat of Clumsiness GanglyLamb's Avatar
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    Like cornedBee said, if it has an adress bus of 32-bits wide , then it's a 32 bit cpu, if it has 64 bit adress bus then its a 64 bit cpu.

    Only big/important differences from what I've learned/remembered from my pc architecture course is that a 64 bit and 32 bit only differ in adress bus width ( thus being able to adres s much more memory ) and that a 64 bit cpu has more built in complex operations than a normal 32 bit cpu, thus being able to perform some complex operations faster since it wouldnt first have to break it down into a couple of basic operations and perform then one by one each cycle. ( was something about risc and cisc architectures ...it's been a while since that course anyway ).

  6. #6
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GanglyLamb
    Like cornedBee said, if it has an adress bus of 32-bits wide , then it's a 32 bit cpu, if it has 64 bit adress bus then its a 64 bit cpu.
    The 32-bit CPU has a 36-bit address bus. I believe the first Athlon64 line had a 48-bit address bus.

    Only big/important differences from what I've learned/remembered from my pc architecture course is that a 64 bit and 32 bit only differ in adress bus width ( thus being able to adres s much more memory ) and that a 64 bit cpu has more built in complex operations than a normal 32 bit cpu, thus being able to perform some complex operations faster since it wouldnt first have to break it down into a couple of basic operations and perform then one by one each cycle. ( was something about risc and cisc architectures ...it's been a while since that course anyway ).
    Apparently. 32-bit and 64-bit architectures differ ONLY in address width (not even the address bus width is dictated by the address width). A given architecture might also add other differences, but this has nothing to do with the bitness.
    For example, IA-32, the 80386+ architecture, is a CISC instruction set, 32-bit address width, 36-bit address bus (4 bits segment descriptor), with 8 more or less general purpose registers.
    However, Pentium and later CPUs were at their core RISC CPUs, with the CISC capabilities kind of patched on.
    x86-64, the Athlon64 architecture, is a CISC instruction set, 64-bit address width (only 48 bits used by the Athlon64), with 16 general purpose registers. But all Athlon64 CPUs are really RISC CPUs too.
    IA-64, the Itanium architecture, is a RISC instruction set, 64-bit address width, with several banks of 128 general purpose registers each.

    All the above is without regards to floating point operations and multimedia extensions such as SSE.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  7. #7
    Just Lurking Dave_Sinkula's Avatar
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    7. It is easier to write an incorrect program than understand a correct one.
    40. There are two ways to write error-free programs; only the third one works.*

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