visual studio 6 and visual studio.net difference

This is a discussion on visual studio 6 and visual studio.net difference within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; hi ! I am newb trying to get my hands into visual studio IDE..... please bear with all my stupid ...

  1. #1
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    visual studio 6 and visual studio.net difference

    hi !

    I am newb trying to get my hands into visual studio IDE.....

    please bear with all my stupid questions.....but I am trying to figure the right way to get into this....

    Do i need to learn visual studio to get my hands into visual studio.net ?????

    I started learning VC++ 6.0 first and I thought it would be the best way before I jump into VC++.net since i will have the foundation.... I thought it would give me base b4 I jump into the .net framework.....

    Are VS 6.0 and VS.net that different ?????

    I plan to follow the same approach for Visual basic.... to learn VB 6.0 and then jump into VB.net since it will be easier I guess....

    Is Visual studio 6.0 a dying technology ?????

    I am little confused a few things.......

    Do I got about learning asp the same way by learning asp first and then jumping into asp.net ????

    Do people still use visual foxpro, visual interdev and visual sourcesafe...... are they worth learning...... ????

  2. #2
    Registered /usr
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    It's an interesting strategy, but no, not really.

    The only thing you're likely to gain in going from VS6 to VS.NET is some C/C++ experience. VS.NET continues to allow you to use those in the same way, although it also brings "managed C++" to the party, which increases your code's reliance on the .NET Framework, but is in someways easier to work with.

    VB6 and VB.NET, however, are two different languages. Visual Basic received an overhaul and added lots of things which increased the overall complexity of the language but also made it a viable alternative to C/C++ as a general language. You won't gain much learning the older version, aside from the constant "Why did they do that?" questions.

    "Is Visual Studio 6 a dying technology"? Well it's old, you know. 1998, nearly ten years ago. And considering that Microsoft's implementation of C++ and STL at the time was deeply flawed versus the ISO standard, I'd say good riddance.

    Of course, there are still a good few companies that rely on the maintainance of "legacy" (i.e. old) apps, so Visual C++ 6 at least isn't dead yet. But as for the rest of the suite, shed a tear, bury the box in your back yard and move on.

  3. #3
    chococoder
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    1) no
    2) yes
    3) yes
    4) no
    5) yes yes yes maybe

  4. #4
    They Call me Mister Sako
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    Do i need to learn visual studio to get my hands into visual studio.net ????? no

    Are VS 6.0 and VS.net that different ????? it depends who you ask, if you plan to "upgrade" in software i think it's best to learn on the latest version, becasue if you don't you wil have to do some relearning when you upgrade (edit: i completely read that question wrong but im going to leave my answer there becasue i'm lazy)

    Is Visual studio 6.0 a dying technology ?????

    i still use it, it depends on how you use it.

    Do I got about learning asp the same way by learning asp first and then jumping into asp.net ???? if you want

    Do people still use visual foxpro, visual interdev and visual sourcesafe...... are they worth learning...... ???? pretty interesitng i just looked over a old foxpro disk the other day trying to find my winXP disk. man it sure was dusty

    people might use these things but not on a wide scale, finding another soul who even knows foxpro exhists is hard to find, and if you do find one they more than likely dont know it or dont remeber it anymore.

    usually learning old languages are good for "introduction" languages. ie alot of people learn to program in BASIC or PASCAL before getting into things like c++. just as an introductory type thing to have the right mind focus, but BASIC and PASCAL are obsolete in the industry
    Last edited by MisterSako; 02-03-2006 at 03:47 PM.
    AIM: MisterSako | MSN: sakotheinsane@hotmail.com | E-mail: klinerr1@nc.rr.com
    The goal of computer science is to be lazy

  5. #5
    chococoder
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    Visual Basic and Delphi are far from obsolete, both are in (relatively) large scale use and are actively being developed by Microsoft and Borland respectively.
    Just because something isn't C++ doesn't mean it's not relevant.

    In contrast Visual C++ 6 IS pretty much irrelevant today. It's been replaced in most companies by a later version and companies where it hasn't been will not be expecting (or shouldn't be) new hirees to have experience with it especially if it's for junior C++ positions.

  6. #6
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    Thanks guys...................

    I think I'll stick to the way of learning the VS 6.0 first in vb, VC++ and asp and then jump onto VC++.net, VB.net and asp.net.......

    but I am still thinking whether I should spend some time on foxpro ...... interdev..... and sourcesafe.....

    if not then what are the new technologies that have replaced these older ones........

    Iam sure microsoft must have done something to save these from dying or come put with their own newer software to replace these....... are there any ????

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