Linux or OpenBSD?

This is a discussion on Linux or OpenBSD? within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; linux yeah.. but what about mandrake? I installed mandrake 10.0.. but it's really really really slow.. much slower than windows ...

  1. #16
    x4000 Ruski's Avatar
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    linux yeah.. but what about mandrake? I installed mandrake 10.0.. but it's really really really slow.. much slower than windows xp pro.. I got celeron 2.4 ghz.. 512 mb ram and 128 gf video card.. what's the problem.. when I open an application it takes way more time to load it than windows would have taken.. even some dumb old calculator.. using kde 3.2
    what does signature stand for?

  2. #17
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    I like Ubuntu myself. Only used it for about 1.5 hours, but the installation on an older computer was pretty quick (faster than windows 98 anyways (I think)), and it has worked like a charm for me so far.
    To code is divine

  3. #18
    Registered User MathFan's Avatar
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    linux yeah.. but what about mandrake?
    Mandrake IS linux. It's a so-called distribution.

    when I open an application it takes way more time to load it than windows would have taken..
    That's odd. Usually it's the other way...

    May be something with the video drivers? If you try to google it and nothing helps, try to upgrade to a newer version of Mandrake. Or may be choose another distro.

    You can try a live cd, too, if you prefer not to install anything on your computer.
    The OS requirements were Windows Vista Ultimate or better, so we used Linux.

  4. #19
    Pursuing knowledge confuted's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MathFan
    Well, all of the distributions above are free, like most of the linux distrivutions in general; there are exceptions though, like Suse, which is totally commercial.
    SuSE is not totally commercial; there is a "personal" edition that is free, but in my experience (several installs), it's not worth running. My soundcard, printer, and NIC wouldn't work with the personal edition; the soundcard and NIC both worked perfectly as soon as the professional install was done, and the printer only took a few minutes to configure.

    Ubuntu will send you a CD (or multiple CDs) free of charge if you ask. It will probably take a few months to get it, since they only ship once they've accumulated a large number of requests, but it's free. http://shipit.ubuntulinux.org/
    Away.

  5. #20
    Registered User MathFan's Avatar
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    SuSE is not totally commercial; there is a "personal" edition that is free
    Yeah, but isn't it some kind of evaluation thingy with practically no packages?

    it's not worth running
    No, why bother to get Suse when you can get another linux distro for free without any restrictions and much more software

    My soundcard, printer, and NIC wouldn't work with the personal edition;
    Well, you can encounter such problems with any distro. While windoze users are used to that everything is done automatically, you can't expect the same of linux. It's not really hard to fix it either (in most cases) - just install the correct drivers and it'll work fine.
    The OS requirements were Windows Vista Ultimate or better, so we used Linux.

  6. #21
    Pursuing knowledge confuted's Avatar
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    I had needed to install drivers, change settings, recompile kernels, etc with other distros to get my hardware working before, and I tried for several hours with SuSE personal to work with my hardware. It was a no go. SuSE professional, however, is very good; it provides wizards to accomplish many things, but I still find that using vim is often the best way to go. It's not based on debian, so you don't use apt-get, but there's YaST, which is somewhat similar (but more limited), and you can compile anything you want from source, which IMO is one of the beautiful things in Linux. So who cares about packages and inefficient precompiled binaries when the source for all of it is free and as easy to install as typing "./configure && make && sudo make install" and your password when prompted?
    Away.

  7. #22
    Registered User MathFan's Avatar
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    recompile kernels
    Surely not to install the printer or the soundcard?

    and I tried for several hours with SuSE personal to work with my hardware.
    You are kidding, right? Several hours?!? I used to spend days and weeks configuring, tweaking and installing things to get all the hardware and os-specific stuff right. And now I've got not only an OS that is configured totally by myself, but also knowledge about the OS itself.

    You just can't give up trying after an hour. That's just not in the spirit of linux . Also shows a nasty windoze attitude - "if I can't get it to work from the first try - screw it..."


    So who cares about packages and inefficient precompiled binaries when the source for all of it is free and as easy to install as typing "./configure && make && sudo make install" and your password when prompted?
    Well, let's take one thing at a time. Who cares about the packages? I do. The more my installation cds include the better. If slackware supplies 2000 progs with their distro, it's good because I don't need to go looking for practically anything online. I just use a couple of hours to install slack and everything the cd-s include - and off we go. Again, I don't need to fetch anything from internet.

    I usually don't use packages otherwise. I use Slackware, which doesn't have a good packaging system anyway. (at least it can't compare to debian's)

    But, c'mon, precompiled binaries and packages CAN be useful in some cases. What if you can't make a tarball source compile, but need the package NOW and have no time to go about debugging the source. Packages CAN help (though not necesseraly of course).

    And one more thing: you are (totally) omitting package/source dependencies. What if you are going to compile something from source and you run into a dependency list which is way too long to fit on a page. Then you can't just type "./configure && make && sudo make install", right?

    But I agree with you in a way. You are right when saying:
    you can compile anything you want from source, which IMO is one of the beautiful things in Linux
    It surely is. I wouldn't have traded it for anything
    The OS requirements were Windows Vista Ultimate or better, so we used Linux.

  8. #23
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    And one more thing: you are (totally) omitting package/source dependencies. What if you are going to compile something from source and you run into a dependency list which is way too long to fit on a page. Then you can't just type "./configure && make && sudo make install", right?
    Why, in that case you use Gentoo, of course
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  9. #24
    Registered User MathFan's Avatar
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    Why, in that case you use Gentoo, of course
    Hehe... Yeah, I've heard that package management with Portage is like heaven. Haven't tried Gentoo myself though.... (may be I should....)
    The OS requirements were Windows Vista Ultimate or better, so we used Linux.

  10. #25
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    You definitely should. It is indeed heaven.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  11. #26
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    Surely not to install the printer or the soundcard?
    To install the sound drivers for my soundcard I would of had to recompile my kernel as well. Instead I put in a livecd of SLAX (based off of slackware right? Hopefuly slackware recognizes it as well) and had it work. Without a constant internet connection in front of me it can be a hassel to do things with Linux it seems.
    To code is divine

  12. #27
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    gentoo!!!
    gentoo rulez... besides the portage there is another heavy wight advantage: gentoo is compiled in your own computer... that makes it work damn fast.... Incredibal... its dam fast.

  13. #28
    Registered User MathFan's Avatar
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    To install the sound drivers for my soundcard I would of had to recompile my kernel as well.
    Hmmm... Ok, I just haven't heard of such problems before. (but, then, I've got an inegrated sound card, so... )

    Instead I put in a livecd of SLAX (based off of slackware right? Hopefuly slackware recognizes it as well)
    Yeah, it's based on the newest slackware distro and 2.6 kernel (if I don't remember wrong). Well, I'm not really sure if slackware will recognize it, but since it works in SLAX there may be a good chance for it.

    It seems like your problems may be kernel version related. If you had to recompile the 2.4.x kernel (if it was that what you used to have), but it worked in 2.6.x, just upgrade to a distro that uses a 2.6 generation kernel. Slackware 10.1 is supplied with both a 2.4.29 kernel and with an alternative: 2.6.10.

    Without a constant internet connection in front of me it can be a hassel to do things with Linux it seems.
    Oh, yes, it is. I used to have a modem connection, I remember how painful it was. You need internet to find info, to download packages/tarballs, download new distros etc. So, yeah, it's almost like linux requires a good internet connection.
    The OS requirements were Windows Vista Ultimate or better, so we used Linux.

  14. #29
    Registered User MathFan's Avatar
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    gentoo!!!
    gentoo rulez... besides the portage there is another heavy wight advantage: gentoo is compiled in your own computer... that makes it work damn fast.... Incredibal... its dam fast.
    All right, all right, you managed to persuade me I'm doanloading it now... hehe
    The OS requirements were Windows Vista Ultimate or better, so we used Linux.

  15. #30
    ... kermit's Avatar
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    Just be aware that if you choose to compile the entire system yourself, it will take quite a while, relatively speaking with regards to how fast your system is. With an old PIII 450 you would be looking at *days*...

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