Windows or Linux?

This is a discussion on Windows or Linux? within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; Hello all! I am planning on learning C++ and I was just wondering if it really mattered which OS I ...

  1. #1
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    Windows or Linux?

    Hello all!

    I am planning on learning C++ and I was just wondering if it really mattered which OS I used. I just put Linux on an old computer that I had, as something else to learn in my spare time.

    Can you compile programs for windows on a linux box and vice versa?

    Thanks in advance!

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    If the programs stick to the c++ standard then yes. But to do some things will require OS specific functions.
    I would say for learning the c++ language it dosen't matter what OS you use.

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    I would say use linux

    the environment is much nicer, plus I just hate windows, vc++ is annoying to learn

    Plus, most of the GUI API's one woudl use on linux have a windows version, so the code can be very easily ported

    go with linux

  4. #4
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    Can you compile programs for windows on a linux box and vice versa?
    Generally no. But, if you write ANSI/ISO Standard C++ code, it can be re-compiled for any platform (on the new platform) if it has a compiler.

    However, there is no sound, graphics, color, or mouse in Standard C++. Most real-world programs have some system-specific (non-portable) code.

    A compiler that makes executable code for a different system is called a cross-compiler. Typically, cross-compilers are used for embedded system development. If you're writing code for an automobile ignition system, you would might develop it (and compile it), on a PC using special-purpose development software, then transfer the executable hex-code to the embedded system. That system may have a non-Intel CPU, and it may have another operating system, or no operating system at all.

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    as much as i hate to say it, i would recommend windows vc++ for the shear fact that you can get very quickly look things up via vc++'s help.

    another thing i hate to say is that *most* (give or take) useful programs are OS dependant in my opinion. you can write console programs for both OS's, but you must adhere to the standard. as far as learning c/c++ goes however, there's only slight differences between OS's. the more low-level or specific you get, the more platform depedant you get. but for learning the language, it's syntax, and it's basic functions, whichever OS (or both) you feel more comfortable with is probably the right one. don't get me wrong, you can write portable, usefull programs but in my opinion, most of them aren't 100% portable.

    i'm a little drunk, so if the above doesn't make much since, let my point be:
    You'll know when to be concerned about which OS you're coding for when you get there.
    i seem to have GCC 3.3.4
    But how do i start it?
    I dont have a menu for it or anything.

  6. #6
    Budding Synth Programmer samGwilliam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by misplaced
    as much as i hate to say it, i would recommend windows vc++ for the shear fact that you can get very quickly look things up via vc++'s help.

    another thing i hate to say is that *most* (give or take) useful programs are OS dependant in my opinion. you can write console programs for both OS's, but you must adhere to the standard. as far as learning c/c++ goes however, there's only slight differences between OS's. the more low-level or specific you get, the more platform depedant you get. but for learning the language, it's syntax, and it's basic functions, whichever OS (or both) you feel more comfortable with is probably the right one. don't get me wrong, you can write portable, usefull programs but in my opinion, most of them aren't 100% portable.

    i'm a little drunk, so if the above doesn't make much since, let my point be:
    You'll know when to be concerned about which OS you're coding for when you get there.
    MSDN is online now.

  7. #7
    Registered User major_small's Avatar
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    please don't think that you need to use VC++ to code in C++ on windows. MingW has ported GCC to windows, so as long as you have standards-compliant code, it'll run fine. if you're just starting out, it doesn't really matter which OS you use, but for more real-life programming, you're going to have to learn a little OS-specific code. I'd say this mostly is determined by your job though.

    note: the MingW port of GCC can be found in Dev-C++
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    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    If you're planning to learn C++, then you'll need either a fairly recent version of GCC (either gcc on linux, or one of the windows ports like dev-c++, mingw, cygwin, djgpp), or the latest microsoft .net compiler.

    VC++ version 6 is so old and out of touch with respect to the C++ standards that it won't be long before you bump into some weirdness.
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
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    Thank you everyone for your input. I think that I am going to start to learn in Windows, only because I am more comfortable in it. I may switch over to Linux at a later date, once I get some more experience with it. I downloaded Bloodshed Dev-C++ so expect more questions from me soon.

    Thanks again.

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    I have a desktop PC and a mac laptop. I've never used Linux. I only program on my PC because my Xcode compiler for mac has insane amounts of errors because its on Mac and I don't want to mess with that stuff. I don't know one bit of vc++ who says you have to learn it just because you have windows?
    My computer is awesome.

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