View Poll Results: How do you purchase a video card?

Voters
9. You may not vote on this poll
  • Read reviews and decide

    4 44.44%
  • Look at actuall specs.

    4 44.44%
  • I get the best on the market

    1 11.11%
  • I don't care much about VCards

    0 0%

Video card components

This is a discussion on Video card components within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; I was wondering, some people don't really look for what kind of processor a video card has. I myself don't ...

  1. #1
    In your face... ha ha ha Liger86's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Motorcity Capital
    Posts
    321

    Video card components

    I was wondering, some people don't really look for what kind of processor a video card has.

    I myself don't look at a video card specs, but I have to start doing that.

    I know that there are like two processors, memmory clock and some wierd other one.

    They usually come like this:
    375Mhz and the second one is a bit faster 425Mhz, so how can you tell from the clock if you are going to be able to run a certain game?

    I think that video game maker should specify the exact clock speeds a video card requires to run their game, not he old fashioned #MB aproach.
    From Ukraine with love!

    Internationally known widely respected

    - Digitally yourz -

  2. #2
    5|-|1+|-|34|) ober's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    4,429
    You REALLY love to post polls, don't you?

  3. #3
    In your face... ha ha ha Liger86's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Motorcity Capital
    Posts
    321
    Originally posted by ober5861
    You REALLY love to post polls, don't you?
    yes, I like people opinions, even if it's something dumb.
    From Ukraine with love!

    Internationally known widely respected

    - Digitally yourz -

  4. #4
    Registered User glUser3f's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    345
    read the specs, and don't buy the latest card, buy the one released exactly before it, you'll waste lots of money otherwise.

  5. #5
    Much older and wiser Fountain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Engeeeerland
    Posts
    1,158
    Originally posted by glUser3f
    read the specs, and don't buy the latest card, buy the one released exactly before it, you'll waste lots of money otherwise.
    Errm unless the latest has a specific function that you require that is...Example optimized for Dx9-Maybe the last card didnt have it.
    Such is life.

  6. #6
    Registered User glUser3f's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    345
    Originally posted by Fountain
    Errm unless the latest has a specific function that you require that is...Example optimized for Dx9-Maybe the last card didnt have it.
    In this case I suggest waiting for a while, because the latest card almost always costs lots more than the one exactly before it

  7. #7
    PC Fixer-Upper Waldo2k2's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    2,001
    If you want performance and compatibility for a decent price, and you're not going to run the new Doom...just go integrated. The intel integrated chipset rocks, I haven't tried many others first hand, the Gigabyte integrated is pretty good too.

    Other than that, if you want a real card, I usually look at the specs., reviews aren't worth a damn.
    PHP and XML
    Let's talk about SAX

  8. #8
    Banned frenchfry164's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,552
    Trust me, when looking to buy a new graphics card, benchmarks and reviews have no importance. Just because some dude could get 5 hundred billion frames per second on an ATI card, and the nVidia card could only dish out 0.00002 FPS, that doesn't mean that the same will apply for your computer. A lot of benchmark people don't take in consideration that some cards are just bad in certain areas. They use the same settings for all cards. You can usually tweak the settings out and get a lot better performance, in more ways than just turning quality down.

    Some benchmarks are just not reliable, and the information you read sometimes is misleading as well.

    I think that video game maker should specify the exact clock speeds a video card requires to run their game, not he old fashioned #MB aproach.
    That wouldn't work. Different chips operate at different effieciencies with clock speed. The #MB "approach" isn't old fashioned either. They're specifying the system requirements. They are saying how much VRAM is needed to store all the textures, etc. for the game.

  9. #9
    Registered User TravisS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    536
    Yup, straight up specs really aren't a good comparison. If that were true, the GeForce FX 5900 Ultra would be blowing the Radeon 9800 Pro out of the water, but that simply isn't the case. Especially in DX9 and PS 2.0

    If nothing else, AMD should have taught people by now that MHz is not everything.


    [edit] I realize that AMD and video cards don't really go hand in hand, but it still illustrates my point

Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Bitwise Unwanted Output
    By pobri19 in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 09-15-2008, 05:07 AM
  2. Vector out of range program crash.
    By Shamino in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-18-2008, 05:37 PM
  3. Blackjack
    By Tommo in forum C Programming
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 06-20-2007, 09:07 PM
  4. How can I access a struct (from a header file)?
    By loxslay in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-07-2006, 02:25 PM
  5. Problem With My Box
    By HaVoX in forum Tech Board
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-15-2005, 08:38 AM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21