8051 microcontrollers

This is a discussion on 8051 microcontrollers within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; i've a few questions about 8051 microcontrollers: [list=1][*]i've heard of very cheap ones (less than $5), but all of the ...

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    8051 microcontrollers

    i've a few questions about 8051 microcontrollers:
    [list=1][*]i've heard of very cheap ones (less than $5), but all of the ones i've researched are >$20. anyone know of any sites online (or stores for that matter) that sell 8051 or 8052 microcontrollers?[*]are microcontrollers with serial ports to upload programs expensive?[*]the ones with serial ports are eeprom ones?[*]how much of the microcontroller would i have to build to do it cheaply?[/list=1]

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    I've never used this family of microcontrollers. But a general site on microcontrollers which is a very usefull source of information is:

    http://microcontroller.com/default.asp

    A very usefull site to compare microcontrollers:

    http://www.keil.com/dd/parm_search.asp

    Maybe you can find something usefull in the FAQ:

    http://www.faqs.org/faqs/microcontroller-faq/8051/

    Also take a look at the site of Atmel:

    http://www.atmel.com/atmel/products/...crocontrollers

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    k, thanks for the info.

    i'm trying to buy a microcontroller that would accept analog input from sensors (maybe through an A/D converted), compute, and act on a single dc motor. i was looking into the 8051 because it seemed cheap and widely used.

    any other advice?

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    The 8052 is of the same family 8051, it seems to be the big brother of the 8051. Since they are family the microcontroller architecture will be the same. This site discusses both.

    http://www.8052.com/

    It has also some tutorials.

    The 8051 is widely used. Most micocontroller-manufacturars have a developer-kit which you can buy to experiment with it.

    Like this:
    http://www.ece.curtin.edu.au/cresta/...grated_Kit.htm

    Those developer-kits are usually quite expensive. Cheaper are the starter-kits.

    http://www.kanda.com/browse.php3?node=32

    You could also take a look at Intel's site:
    http://developer.intel.com/

    [edit]
    At this site an overview of several starter kits, but this company has quite high prices.

    http://www.crossware.com/datasheets/8051sk.htm
    [/edit]
    Last edited by Shiro; 12-01-2002 at 07:01 AM.

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    i found something here...
    http://www.pjrc.com/store/dev_pcb_kit.html

    it looks interesting, but i'm not sure i want a kit like this... for some reason i feel weird buying a kit when i could just make something with bare pieces from many manufacturers... i dunno...

    any input?

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    It depends on what you want.

    If you want to learn the architecture of a microcontroller-system and you want to learn how to apply the microcontroller, then buying a ready-to-use kit is a good thing. You can immediately apply the microcontroller in some project and learn how to use and program it. In this point of view the kit is just a piece of a larger system you want to create.

    But you can also only have the microcontroller and build the other electronics around it yourself. In this point of view, the kit is the system you want to create. It requires the same knowledge, but the goal is different.

    At work I had a very small Motorola 68000 board. After studying its architecture I knew how to use it and applied it in some applications. For me a microcontroller-board is a tool to make a system working, not a goal on itself. That is the difference between these two points of view.

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