Like Tree2Likes

What language is best for a beginner in programming?

This is a discussion on What language is best for a beginner in programming? within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; A note about the choices, they all have sub-optimal garbage collection, which means they annoyingly use an ass load more ...

  1. #16
    Unregistered User Yarin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,626
    A note about the choices, they all have sub-optimal garbage collection, which means they annoyingly use an ass load more memory than they should. Python is probably the worst offender of the bunch.
    A class that doesn't overload all operators just isn't finished yet. -- SmugCeePlusPlusWeenie
    A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God. -- Alan J. Perlis

  2. #17
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,258
    I'm not defending C++ here... it has its issues, as do all languages. You mention some [of those issues] - e.g. dynamic binding.
    O_o

    I can't speak for Yarin, but you have at the least missed my point.

    Yes, all languages have their sins, but "strong typing"/"weak typing"/"dynamic binding"/"static binding" are not to be counted among the sins. Using each well improves the quality of an interface.

    I spoke of "use polymorphism" in C++; I spokse "type erasure" and how it makes the standard tools so much better; those C++ tools only exist thanks to a combination of all four of those things.

    Your fear of those tools is silly and pointless.

    [Edit]
    Also, though nothing of nothing, I recall C#4 has support for purely "dynamic binding" and "duck typing".
    [/Edit]

    Soma
    “Often out of periods of losing come the greatest strivings toward a new winning streak.” -- Fred Rogers
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer

  3. #18
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,604
    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    I spoke of "use polymorphism" in C++; I spokse "type erasure" and how it makes the standard tools so much better; those C++ tools only exist thanks to a combination of all four of those things.
    And that's great - more tools. But I don't see any static typing in Python. I could just be missing it, not being familiar with it and all.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  4. #19
    Epy
    Epy is offline
    Fortran lover Epy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    963
    There is optional static typing in Python.

  5. #20
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,604
    Great news. I will have to revise my opinion on Python.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  6. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,283
    In my opinion, for a person that's never programmed before, the ideal initial learning language would be one where the syntax is fairly intuitive to a non-programmer, and the class assignments would be simple to implement programs. Having an interactive mode would be similar to using a calculator. This learning language would only be used for a month or so, and then the student would switch to one of the common languages currently in use (C, C++, C#, Java, Python, ... ). The learning language could be something like a sub-set of Basic, used just enough to get an idea of what's going on.

    Again in my opinion, somewhere along the line, it would also help to spend about a month with some type of assembly language, with a source level debugger / emulator to allow the student to step through the code to see what is happening. If X86, I would use a sub-set of the instructions and keep the example programs simple.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. C++(new to any computer language) beginner
    By bba in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-29-2005, 10:09 AM
  2. What's the Difference Between a Programming Language and a Scripting Language?
    By Krak in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 07-15-2005, 04:46 PM
  3. Beginner's Language Paper
    By Thantos in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-04-2004, 04:48 PM
  4. Which is a better beginner's language
    By Thantos in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-08-2003, 09:50 AM
  5. Beginner needing help in C language
    By chauncey005 in forum C Programming
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-26-2003, 02:04 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21