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Must install Linux

This is a discussion on Must install Linux within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; I am obliged to install Linux on my laptop (which is just an average latop, an average person (not programmer) ...

  1. #1
    SAMARAS std10093's Avatar
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    Must install Linux

    I am obliged to install Linux on my laptop (which is just an average latop, an average person (not programmer) would have).

    I have win7 (downloaded from msdnaa).

    I guess I have to go for a dual boot.

    People suggested Linux mint.

    I am good only in the terminal in Linux (I am accessing the Linux Lab of my uni, via Putty and winscp). That's it. I do not know anything else on Linux. NOTHING!

    If someone has to suggest something, please let me know. Moreover, if someone knows links in how to install and configure the dual boot, please let me know. I am looking for my "Hello world\n" in Linux!
    Code - functions and small libraries I use


    It’s 2014 and I still use printf() for debugging.


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  2. #2
    and the hat of int overfl Salem's Avatar
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    Do you need dual boot?

    Or can you get away with running Linux in say virtualbox or vmware?

    The advantage of a virtualised solution is that you can run both at the same time, and even set up folder sharing and networking between the two machines.
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    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    O_o

    I've never used the "Linux Mint" distribution, and with so many distributions, I think making a specific recommendation is odd, but I do have a recommendation of sorts as a "sort-a" newbie: don't go for "Arch", "Slackware", or "Ubuntu".

    Now, I see nothing wrong with those distributions. (I use "Arch", used to be "Slackware", and usually install "Ubuntu" for the "Windows" crowd.) However, I'd recommend something more "middle of the ground" difficulty wise for a programmer who is just new to an own "Linux".

    As for "dual boot", with "Windows 7" and a decently modern "Linux" distribution, "dual boot" should basically "just work", but even if not, it looks like "Mint" installs "Grub 2" so you'll be looking at editing a couple of text files.

    The only difficult, more annoying really, part of "dual boot" will come if your "Windows 7" partition lives on the entire drive of a single disc system. If so, you'll be happy to follow my advice: backup everything before trying to repartition.

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    I'd recommend ubuntu server, because it skips a lot of the desktop-ish packages on install, and is a lot leaner. all of the packages for the desktop version are still available, and you can install any desktop environment you choose, but it's done manually, instead of automatically. ubuntu is probably the best supported distro out there, so that's a huge advantage. if you need to know how to do something, chances are someone out there knows how.
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    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    if you need to know how to do something, chances are someone out there knows how.
    ^_^

    Well, yeah, but that's true for every operating system.

    Even "Plan 9", the best OS, has a rabid following.

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  6. #6
    Registered User Codeplug's Avatar
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    >> I am obliged to install Linux on my laptop
    Do you really need a full OS? You could install Cygwin or MSYS and do most things that you'd probably do at school - editing, compiling etc.

    At least you don't have to download and sneaker-net twenty-something floppies, like I had to do for my first Linux box (Slackware).

    gg

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    - - - - - - - - oogabooga's Avatar
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    Looks like mint is quite popular these days:
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    SAMARAS std10093's Avatar
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    So, the question right know is: dual boot or vm? Salem used the term sandbox, so sandbox or vm?

    Some people said to me that the vm may not be supported my laptop. Is there anyone that can say more on that based on the facts in the image? Which is THE hot question for me at this moment. I am afraid about disk issues with dual boot very² much! I do not care if the vm makes Linux to run a bit slower, in comparison with the hypothesis that I did install Linux on my laptop(dual boot).
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    Do you really need a full OS? You could install Cygwin or MSYS and do most things that you'd probably do at school - editing, compiling etc.
    My intention is that I can use libraries easily. There are certain cases so far, that people suggested me several libraries and avoided testing them, because the installation would require much more effort than the one in Linux (whenever the library was supported in windows too). Now, I have forgotten most of the libraries, but future has a lot to give.

    Right now, I have to use cgal. When in Switzerland, I had installed cgal in mac Os and it was just fine. The windows case seems to much and many people said to me (relevant with cgal) said to me, that it is better to use Linux (for the installation of cgal).

    In conclusion, I feel that I need Linux, in order to be flexible in using libraries (like cgal, boost, etc.).
    // I remember floppies a little. ;p
    Code - functions and small libraries I use


    It’s 2014 and I still use printf() for debugging.


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    Registered User Codeplug's Avatar
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    You can do all that in Cygwin.

    Give it a try. Only need to uninstall to remove

    gg

  10. #10
    Epy
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    I use Lubuntu, it's very minimalist and has most keyboard shortcuts from Windows. It's basically Ubuntu but with all the bull........ cut out and a leaner window manager and desktop environment

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    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by std10093
    Salem used the term sandbox, so sandbox or vm?
    A search of this page shows that you're the first person in this thread to use the term sandbox
    What Salem mentioned was virtualbox, which is one of the options available if you want a VM.
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    - - - - - - - - oogabooga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laserlight View Post
    A search of this page shows that you're the first person in this thread to use the term sandbox
    What Salem mentioned was virtualbox, which is one of the options available if you want a VM.
    I suppose a virtual machine offers a kind of sandboxing, though.
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  13. #13
    11DE784A SirPrattlepod's Avatar
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    You lose nothing by installing virtual box and then installing Linux onto a VM. So, why not do that and see if the performance is acceptable for you and if not then fret about installing it on bare metal.

    If your hardware doesn't support virtualbox (and I don't really see any reason why it wouldn't) then just uninstall virtualbox.

  14. #14
    SAMARAS std10093's Avatar
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    Thank you all for your answers. Laserlight, you should be a detective.

    I was almost ready to go for a solution with vm (or cygwin), but some people said to me that, if I want to take measurements on my projects and experiment with BIG data, etc., then I should go with dual boot (they did not really tell why). Are they correct?

    If so, is dual-boot such a risk for my pc and will decrease the life of my hard disk?
    So we are again on Salem's and Codeplug's question: Do I need a dual boot (a full OS)?

    As said in post #8: "My intention is that I can use libraries easily. There are certain cases so far, that people suggested me several libraries and avoided testing them, because the installation would require much more effort than the one in Linux (whenever the library was supported in windows too). Now, I have forgotten most of the libraries, but future has a lot to give.

    Right now, I have to use cgal." .. and experiment on BIG data.
    The tech characteristics of my laptop are on post #8 as well.

    // Sorry for being too scholastic..
    Code - functions and small libraries I use


    It’s 2014 and I still use printf() for debugging.


    "Programs must be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute. " —Harold Abelson

  15. #15
    Registered User Codeplug's Avatar
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    >> some people said to me that, if I want to take measurements on my projects and experiment with BIG data, etc., then I should go with dual boot (they did not really tell why). Are they correct?
    I would say No - but I'd like to hear an explanation for that one.

    >> is dual-boot such a risk for my pc and will decrease the life of my hard disk?
    I think the risk is in screwing up the installation - loosing your windows partition (or the ability to boot to it). There is no risk in installing Cygwin and/or a VM since they can just be uninstalled. Personally, I use VMware Player with pre-built images from the inter-web (like: Linux Mint 14 VMware image with Tools).

    gg

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