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Must install Linux

This is a discussion on Must install Linux within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; Personally I think the risk is small if you are careful; it's not like 1994 where installing dualboot was a ...

  1. #16
    11DE784A SirPrattlepod's Avatar
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    Personally I think the risk is small if you are careful; it's not like 1994 where installing dualboot was a process that was somewhat tricky. After installation the risk is zero.

    Checklist


    • Backup important data on laptop
    • Defrag HDD (can't hurt)
    • Examine current disk layout (e.g. is disk partitioned already?) just to know the current state
    • Check BIOS (if you have an EUFI Bios you may need to turn secure boot or whatever it's called off)
    • Install linux


    The installation will prompt you before making permenant changes and give you the chance to bail out. Check and double check and then go for it.

    Another advantage of the virtualbox route, though, is that you can practice installing before doing it for real.
    Last edited by SirPrattlepod; 10-11-2013 at 03:50 PM.

  2. #17
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by std10093 View Post
    Some people said to me that the vm may not be supported my laptop. Is there anyone that can say more on that based on the facts in the image?
    The only point that can be made about the hardware is that it may not support virtualization, which is simply the lack of processor support of hardware virtualization. It is also known as Hardware Assisted Virtualization. It's technologies like Intel's VT-x and VT-d or AMD's AMD-V and AMD-Vi. Specifically, these are processor extensions that provide virtual machines with direct hardware access for faster performance.

    But whether your processor supports these technologies or not, is irrelevant when it comes to your ability to run virtualbox. It should run just fine regardless. It's just that without processor assistance you won't be benefiting from a performance increase given by direct hardware access.

    In any case, your processor does indeed support VT-x and Extended VT-x. But it lacks support for VT-d because... because... because no one really understands Intel erratic virtualization support along its product line. I'm sure not even people working at Intel.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  3. #18
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by std10093 View Post
    I was almost ready to go for a solution with vm (or cygwin), but some people said to me that, if I want to take measurements on my projects and experiment with BIG data, etc., then I should go with dual boot (they did not really tell why). Are they correct?
    Depends on why and how you want to measure.
    You should be aware that virtual machines, due to their nature, won't run as fast or good as bare metal. In typical scenarios, with virtualization support and a virtualization-aware OS, the performance should be negligible for general purpose cases, but if you really, really need every little bit of performance, you may have to go the bare metal route.

    So timing something in a VM and without will yield different results and they cannot be compared to each other.
    So is it it right or wrong? Only you can answer that. Just keep the above in mind.
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    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  4. #19
    SAMARAS std10093's Avatar
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    Thank you all for the answers. I have this in mind Elysia as well.

    Maybe, I will go for the dual boot selection...
    Code - functions and small libraries I use


    It’s 2014 and I still use printf() for debugging.


    "Programs must be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute. " —Harold Abelson

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elkvis View Post
    I'd recommend ubuntu server, because it skips a lot of the desktop-ish packages on install, and is a lot leaner.
    But the inverse is that you'd have to know exactly what package you need to install, and manually installing many packages that are default in the desktop version is time consuming.
    IDE: Code::Blocks | Compiler Suite for Windows: TDM-GCC (MingW, gdb)

  6. #21
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    I've used Linux Mint, after trying a few major distros, and Linux Mint is by far the easiest to set up and use. I've also used Virtualbox, and it is magnificent. And free.
    IDE: Code::Blocks | Compiler Suite for Windows: TDM-GCC (MingW, gdb)

  7. #22
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    So timing something in a VM and without will yield different results and they cannot be compared to each other.
    Timing is the worst way to measure performance. It is also the wrong way to do it.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  8. #23
    SAMARAS std10093's Avatar
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    As oogaboog stated, cfanatic, Mint is very popular.
    It is open software, so yes it is free.

    Mario said: "Timing is the worst way to measure performance. It is also the wrong way to do it."
    I would say that:
    Timing is not the proper way to measure performance.
    I think that the ideal and more reliable method is to count how many nodes for a example (when searching on a tree) your algorithm accessed and stuff like that. However, people tend to ask you to measure the time!
    Code - functions and small libraries I use


    It’s 2014 and I still use printf() for debugging.


    "Programs must be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute. " —Harold Abelson

  9. #24
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Mario F.'s statement is obviously hyperbole since I can cite an even worse way of measuring performance. If you want a discussion on performance measurement, I suggest starting another thread.
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  10. #25
    11DE784A SirPrattlepod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laserlight View Post
    Mario F.'s statement is obviously hyperbole since I can cite an even worse way of measuring performance. If you want a discussion on performance measurement, I suggest starting another thread.
    This whole thread is crazy.

    @std10093 one way or the another, just install it already!

  11. #26
    SAMARAS std10093's Avatar
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    I hadn't the intention to start talking about performance measurements. I will. Thank you all for your answers!
    Code - functions and small libraries I use


    It’s 2014 and I still use printf() for debugging.


    "Programs must be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute. " —Harold Abelson

  12. #27
    Registered User MutantJohn's Avatar
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    I started with Ubuntu and I loved it so much I switched to Arch and I'll probably never leave it. I've always been tempted to try Gentoo though.

    The only real way to choose a Linux distro though is to ask yourself, and I mean really ask yourself, does it support Gnome 3? Gnome 3 is by far and above the most important part of any modern Linux distro, imo.

  13. #28
    11DE784A SirPrattlepod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MutantJohn View Post
    The only real way to choose a Linux distro though is to ask yourself, and I mean really ask yourself, does it support Gnome 3? Gnome 3 is by far and above the most important part of any modern Linux distro, imo.
    Seriously? Gnome 3 is, to put it bluntly as I am inclined to do, crap.
    manasij7479 likes this.

  14. #29
    Registered User MutantJohn's Avatar
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    Yeah, maybe if your GPU is from 1999 but from where I'm standing, it's eye candy to the extreme.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by std10093 View Post
    When did you start using Windows? I thought that you had a Mac?
    IDE: Code::Blocks | Compiler Suite for Windows: TDM-GCC (MingW, gdb)

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