View Poll Results: C ides

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  • GCC / text editor

    11 57.89%
  • Other compiler/text editor

    1 5.26%
  • Pelles C

    2 10.53%
  • Eclipse

    4 21.05%
  • Xcode

    0 0%
  • Other

    5 26.32%
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Favorite IDE?

This is a discussion on Favorite IDE? within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; Originally Posted by whiteflags Why is the poll multiple choice. Anyway, I feel tool agnostic now. I basically use what ...

  1. #16
    language hopper dennis.cpp's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whiteflags View Post
    Why is the poll multiple choice. Anyway, I feel tool agnostic now. I basically use what I'm required to use.
    So basically, what you're saying is: "Why can I choose more than one answer? Oh, by the way, and totally unrelated, I use more than one tool."

    Did I get you right?
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  2. #17
    Registered User whiteflags's Avatar
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    I'm just not used to people having more than one favorite whatever.
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  3. #18
    language hopper dennis.cpp's Avatar
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    Haha, I know, I got your point, just wanted to pick on you a little. Plus I don't think the poll was meant to be like 'what is your one and only tool which you worship for ever and ever 'til the end of time no matter what task you're working at?'. Might rather have been intended to give an impression on what people regularly use. Natural languages are not as strict and literal as programming languages.
    Hardware: Intel® Core™ i7-3630QM CPU @ 2.40GHz × 8
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  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by whiteflags View Post
    I'm just not used to people having more than one favorite whatever.
    Truth be told... if you have more than one "favorite" you have no favorite...
    But I take your point.

  5. #20
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    The only IDE I've actually tried is Code::Blocks and that was briefly and a long time ago. The main thing I don't like about the idea is the "integrated" part -- I don't see the point of something that compiles and runs code for you, to me that is just too gimmicky. It reminds me of "instant tea". Isn't tea instant already?

    The other thing I don't like is having to use mouse cut n' paste for editing; probably there are alternatives to that on most IDEs (?).*

    But I wouldn't mind hints about, eg, scope screw-ups, above and beyond what you get from syntax highlighting. Perl uses braces for both scope and indicating hash or object members:
    Code:
    $self->{sloop}->{buffered}->{$self->{fd}} = 1;
    Not hard to forget that red brace, and (obviously) it does screw the interpreter up, occasionally in awkward ways. As in, depending on the extent of the nesting, an error can be reported dozens of lines later. Not a huge deal, but it does mean some tedious scanning from time to time.

    If I had an editor that could spot stuff like that, I'd use it. Eclipse works with perl and all the other languages I commonly use except javascript. Maybe I'll give it a try in the new year when I start learning java, if it works properly on linux. Voluntarily using the windows desktop is really a bit to much to ask, and macs are even more deranged.

    * I'm very attached to vim "command mode" yy, dd, p, ctrl-j, etc.
    Last edited by MK27; 12-22-2011 at 05:04 AM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  6. #21
    Registered User rogster001's Avatar
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    haha, no mention of UNIX vi editor..can't beleive it, no S&M fans here then! ...

    I love code blocks, but recently have been having to write a lot of shell script stuff and as a stand alone editor notepad++ is ace, Its been really useful tool, it supports so many languages and has lovely configurable highlighting for related statements depending on the context.
    Last edited by rogster001; 12-22-2011 at 05:45 AM.
    Thought for the day:
    "Are you sure your sanity chip is fully screwed in sir?" (Kryten)
    FLTK: "The most fun you can have with your clothes on."

    Stroustrup:
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  7. #22
    Registered User manasij7479's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    If I had an editor that could spot stuff like that, I'd use it. Eclipse works with perl and all the other languages I commonly use except javascript. Maybe I'll give it a try in the new year when I start learning java, if it works properly on linux. Voluntarily using the windows desktop is really a bit to much to ask, and macs are even more deranged.

    * I'm very attached to vim "command mode" yy, dd, p, ctrl-j, etc.
    Eclipse works fine on linux...
    (It also has a VI editing mode plugin )
    Manasij Mukherjee | gcc-4.8.2 @Arch Linux
    Slow and Steady wins the race... if and only if :
    1.None of the other participants are fast and steady.
    2.The fast and unsteady suddenly falls asleep while running !



  8. #23
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogster001 View Post
    haha, no mention of UNIX vi editor..can't beleive it, no S&M fans here then! ...
    One person's pleasure is another person's pain.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    The only IDE I've actually tried is Code::Blocks and that was briefly and a long time ago. The main thing I don't like about the idea is the "integrated" part -- I don't see the point of something that compiles and runs code for you, to me that is just too gimmicky. It reminds me of "instant tea". Isn't tea instant already?
    Trust me... your testicles will not fall off if you endulge yourself with a little convenience...
    dennis.cpp and Serapth like this.

  10. #25
    language hopper dennis.cpp's Avatar
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    Haha, Tater, you never know. Wasn't there this one guy from the Darwin Awards who, "for a little convenience", tried polishing his testicles with a bowling ball polishing machine?
    MK27 likes this.
    Hardware: Intel® Core™ i7-3630QM CPU @ 2.40GHz × 8
    Operating system: Fedora 19 (64-Bit) / Linux 3.11.6-200.fc19 / KDE SC 4.11.2
    Compiler: gcc 4.8.2 with Netbeans IDE 7.4

  11. #26
    Registered User rogster001's Avatar
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    Trust me... your testicles will not fall off if you endulge yourself with a little convenience...
    A very good point, i might just have to add that as thought for the day on my signature.

    I think we are talking about evoultion myself. Instant tea has completely 'eclipsed' the use of tea leaves, straining, messing about manually etc, And do you mean instant tea or tea bags? In which case there is no reason why a tea bag cannot contain the same quality tea as manually making it, its just that its packaged in a convenient way :-> so why should the build process be any different? You can set up make files, compier options, flags, output build process however you like blah blah, in a good IDE, so why would you want to stick with pure command line stuff? Despite having a very good command of keyboard shportcuts and what have you in whatever environment, I am in danger of getting RSI by working so much at the command line at the moment!
    What are the advantages really? the only reason the company i work for does so much UNIX stuff is down to legacy applications, ie old stuff. migration is in progress to new platform for all clients, all releases and the build tools etc will be taking care of everything, then its all hosted or cloud stuff, I cant see where the command line fits in other than smoke and mirrors to non technical people.

    A very eminent programmer I met said that 'IDE's' get in the way of the 'Real work'
    Can anybody explain that statement? I dont see that , but then i am not an eminent programmer...
    Last edited by rogster001; 12-22-2011 at 06:15 AM.
    Thought for the day:
    "Are you sure your sanity chip is fully screwed in sir?" (Kryten)
    FLTK: "The most fun you can have with your clothes on."

    Stroustrup:
    "If I had thought of it and had some marketing sense every computer and just about any gadget would have had a little 'C++ Inside' sticker on it'"

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogster001 View Post
    A very eminent programmer I met said that 'IDE's' get in the way of the 'Real work'
    Can anybody explain that statement? I dont see that , but then i am not an eminent programmer...
    Yes, well... I know a guy who's only role in life, for nearly 20 years, was putting spark plugs in engines on a production line.
    One day they came alone with an air wrench for him to use and he declined saying he can do a better job with his old crank and socket. The foreman took the air wrench and put in 4 spark plugs in the time it took him to put in one.
    He still complains about it to this very day, entirely missing the point that the "real work" he was doing was slowing down the entire line and made his job much harder than it needed to be.

    So, what is the "real work" of a programmer... Producing code... right?
    I don't care to mess with all the manual tools and their added difficulty.
    I also don't want to spend my time doing recompiles over typos that syntax highlighting will show me on the fly.
    I also don't want to make some gargantuan effort about brace matching when the IDE can do it for me.

    I don't want to thnk about a messy, drawn out process...
    I want to think about the behaviours I'm leveraging and the best way to accomplish my goals.

    A good IDE's lets me do that...

  13. #28
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rogster001 View Post
    I think we are talking about evoultion myself. Instant tea has completely 'eclipsed' the use of tea leaves, straining, messing about manually etc, And do you mean instant tea or tea bags?
    No, I meant instant tea. You don't have to let it steep, but it doesn't come in a bag, so you have to measure it out. Some people will fall for anything.

    You can set up make files, compier options, flags, output build process however you like blah blah, in a good IDE, so why would you want to stick with pure command line stuff?
    Because it's easier. I do not like point and click as an abstraction layer. I have the option of using stuff like that, occasionally I have to use stuff like that, I find it tiresome and slow. Like it amazes me that most people think GUI file browsers are a good idea. As if drag and drop represented an improvement over the F5 key. No, it does not. And pull down menus are not an improvement over command-line auto completion (unless your shell doesn't have that, which my hunch is the windows terminal and shell are both such decrepit pieces of tish that in fact, your only choice is point and click -- ie, it's you that does not understand the alternative, not me).

    I honestly believe in large measure the appeal of a lot of GUI stuff has nothing to do with convenience. It's because people like glitzy interfaces. I can understand for people who simply don't use a computer to do work much, and hence don't want to learn or remember commands or keystrokes. But I do this all the time. To me it's about as hard as speaking English.

    For me to use the compiler (or "make") manually takes four keystrokes (select and foreground terminal, up arrow, return). If I want to adjust the flags or what ever, they're right there -- no pulling down menus. I also don't see an advantage in someone else's ideas about an additional interface between me and the compiler that exists purely to facilitate a GUI that takes up half the screen with shiny buttons. Plus: one of the last things I'm interested in is consulting compiler documentation, then IDE documentation about the compiler interface. TOO MUCH ABSTRACTION.

    I prefer standard to automatic, too, altho I know this baffles some people.
    Last edited by MK27; 12-22-2011 at 06:37 AM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  14. #29
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    what I feel is the biggest advantage of an IDE is an integrated debugger. it may be just because I'm not very familiar with using gdb from the command line, but I really like being able to step through my code visually, and have a window full of local variables update automatically, on the fly, while I'm debugging. having the visual feedback just makes the process flow more naturally and smoothly.
    MK27 and Elysia like this.

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    I also don't see an advantage in someone else's ideas about an additional interface between me and the compiler that exists purely to facilitate a GUI that takes up half the screen with shiny buttons. Plus: one of the last things I'm interested in is consulting compiler documentation, then IDE documentation about the compiler interface. TOO MUCH ABSTRACTION.

    I prefer standard to automatic, too, altho I know this baffles some people.
    Not at all... I understand it perfectly.

    You are convinced that hard work is better work ... and most often it isn't.

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