Multiplatform Language non Managed

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    Multiplatform Language non Managed

    Hi I was looking to find out if there are any easy to learn languages that compile to multiple platforms and architectures (non managed code) with a visual IDE? For example are REBOL and Qt any good?

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    They are not languages.

    C/C++ are.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    REBOL is a programming language. Been ages since I last heard of it. Basically I forgot it even existed. But back in the day, it was released with quite the fanfare.

    Hi I was looking to find out if there are any easy to learn languages that compile to multiple platforms and architectures (non managed code) with a visual IDE? For example are REBOL and Qt any good?
    Nope. No easy to learn one. Your requirements however don't give us many options. As cyberfish mentioned, that's C and C++ for most. But if you do specify them more clearly (particularly, the systems you would like to target and the type of programs you would like to develop) we could probably come up with other options...
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    hi Mario, I am looking for an easy to read language which can then be compiled into other architectures and platforms. I am not that keen on learning a really esoteric language with too much overt and perhaps needless complexity, for example having to write 10 lines of code to do a+b-c*d and store the result in an array as is not really my thing eg asm. Basic is sortof ok, although I can't help but think that there is more to good programming than this language, besides I am no longer a beginner, so there must be more grown up progressive languages available. So intuitive mathematical syntax and string functions. Some people really like objects although I didn't really find them great for me, I preferred the modular approach. Then I don't really want to rewrite the code for multiple architectures or platforms, so it should be able to compile to multiple operating systems and cpu architectures. Also it is too time consuming to have to build all the forms/windows from scratch, nor have to recode all the mathematical functions, so it should also have a visual form designer and mathematical functions and textfile reading and writing and graphics etc. Finally managed code is not my preference as unmanaged code in all of my testing runs much faster and can be used for a greater number of purposes.

    I just read about R, although I am not that sure about it, and haven't tried it at all.
    Last edited by DigitalMaker; 07-10-2010 at 10:27 PM.

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Make no mistake, C++ is no slouch. Since it's multi-paradigm, it won't force you to any specific programming style, even if OOP has its benefits.
    It has a huge standard library that allows to do things easily and fast. There are also complementing libraries that fill in the gaps.
    It also has frameworks GUI that are portable, and some, at least I believe, have visual form designers (Qt?).
    There are likely a lot of Math libraries out there if the standard math functions won't do.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    REBOL is not a language?? I've been using it regularly for the past 6 years as my primary development tool. I have several significant businesses, a number of web sites, and tons of personal scripts that are entirely REBOL. It's the most productive environment I've ever used. (take a look at http://re-bol.com or http://re-bol.com/examples.txt)
    Last edited by notchent; 07-12-2010 at 01:02 PM.

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