Ketchup error patch failed:256

This is a discussion on Ketchup error patch failed:256 within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; Hi okay well I basically have the error pointed on the title basically i put in coming from a 2.6.17 ...

  1. #1
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    Ketchup error patch failed:256

    Hi okay well I basically have the error pointed on the title

    basically i put in coming from a 2.6.17 linux
    Code:
    ketchup 2.6.18
    downloads alot of files ... then
    patching file sound/usb/usbmixer.c
    patching file usr/Makefile
    ketchup:patch /root/.ketchup/patch-2.6.18.brz failed: 256
    Im just trying to figure it out There was a link to another problem sorta similar but when i read it didn't seem like they fixed this error? does anyone know what the error means or where to look up the error
    heres the link wit a similar problem
    [ANNOUNCE] ketchup 0.8 | Linux | Kernel

  2. #2
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Hmmm. That thread kinds of dead ends.

    Again, ketchup does not appear to have been maintained for several years, and evidently may not have been very "stable" to start with.

    Why exactly do you need to do this/what are you trying to accomplish? There is probably another way.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    What I'm trying to accomplish is upgrading a kernel seperate to the one im using for developing embedded linux-arm. Basically I have a linux-2.6.17 running and I want to get to linux-2.6.24 because theres an extra function that 24 has for embedded properties. But Ive tried other methods to get from .17 to .24 and the only other option i guess is to manually patch it which im not very sure how to do or could find an easy website to do it manually. even the Document in linux folder trys to explain it but got confused

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    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Actually building a kernel is not that hard. It is not at all "risky" either, because what happens is, you just get an extra listing in your grub boot menu for an alternate kernel. If it doesn't work, you just select your old kernel.

    The worst part is getting the configuration done. If you have to go thru all the options, it can take a few hours. However, you probably don't have to do that.

    First, since you are using a stock distro kernel, get the distro source package for it (not the source tarball from kernel.org). Check in the source directory for a file called ".config". That's your current configuration.

    Next, download a source tarball for the latest stable kernel:
    http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kern...6.33.2.tar.bz2
    which came out on April Fool's Day, ha ha. Unpack (tar -xjf) that wherever you want, obviously right next to the current source is a good place, so you have two directories:
    linux-2.6.17
    linux-2.6.33.2

    Notice, there is no ".config" in the new one yet. Copy the .config in from the old directory and in the new directory:
    make oldconfig
    This will probably ask you a few questions to do with things that are in the new kernel that weren't in the old one, but it shouldn't take too long.

    Now you can get a better look at the various options. You need Qt installed (yum search qt, etc).
    make xconfig
    Have fun with that, one of the options at the top is where you can add a suffix. When you're ready, do all this as root:

    make
    make modules
    make modules_install
    make install

    That creates a new directory in /lib/modules, builds them, adds them, builds the kernel, installs that, updates grub. It takes 5-30 minutes. Since you are using fedora, you need to have a initial ramdisk, if the "oldconfig" worked that should be taken care of (otherwise, the boot will fail and you'll have to pick your old one to get back, then do some manual re-configuration).

    All that's left is to try re-booting. Don't worry if it doesn't work the first time but it probably will.

    Anyway, I have work to do here and so will be around most of the evening if you have any problems, etc. Have a google around too. This might be good:
    http://www.digitalhermit.com/linux/K...ild-HOWTO.html
    Also this, which is more concise:
    http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/compil...kernel-26.html
    Last edited by MK27; 04-21-2010 at 03:35 PM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    sorry to bug u again im not really sure how this works so make oldconfig in the
    linux-2.6.33.2 directory
    What does make oldconfig do exactly just bring up questions on new options for the new kernel? or all the options and if its all the options do u think I have to reselect the configuration from my old .config or are the answers already presaved?

  6. #6
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Different kernel versions have the different config options arranged in slightly different ways. You should always save your .config after you are happy, so you can use it again*. If you use it with a different source version, "make oldconfig" will go thru and get what it can from it. Anything else has to be done manually, so it will ask about (eg) new options.

    There's a lot of options. Like I said, the last time I sat down with xconfig and did the whole thing from scratch, it took a few hours. It's not a bad thing to do, actually, to get acquainted with some of the possibilities, etc, but on the other hand, you probably want to make sure to stick as close to your current configuration for now. Which without "make oldconfig", you'd have to guess, because the default settings have nothing to do with anything AFAICT.

    Actually brewbuck told me about make oldconfig, so I've only used it once or twice. Before that I would always do a manual configuration everytime I upgraded to a new version, so I am pretty familiar with how it is all laid out and fits together. I've been building kernels since v. 2.1, on and off.

    * there is an (newer) option in there to build it into the kernel too, and make it accessible in /proc. That's near the top somewhere too.
    Last edited by MK27; 04-21-2010 at 03:34 PM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    Registered User jeffcobb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiros88 View Post
    What I'm trying to accomplish is upgrading a kernel seperate to the one im using for developing embedded linux-arm. Basically I have a linux-2.6.17 running and I want to get to linux-2.6.24 because theres an extra function that 24 has for embedded properties. But Ive tried other methods to get from .17 to .24 and the only other option i guess is to manually patch it which im not very sure how to do or could find an easy website to do it manually. even the Document in linux folder trys to explain it but got confused
    Yeah I would second MK...you are going about this the waaay hard way. True you are hampered by working with an RPM-based system but at the end of the day it is no harder than going to kernel.org, downloading the one you want, configure, compile and install. I know how to do it on Debian-based systems so its almost no techie anything at all plus you get total kernel rollback ability with no effort...but messing with the ketchup thing sounds like a recipe for pain IMHO...
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