No decent linux calculator?!??

This is a discussion on No decent linux calculator?!?? within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; Now here is a very sorry state of affairs. I was looking at C_ntua's comments in another thread, and sat ...

  1. #1
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    No decent linux calculator?!??

    Now here is a very sorry state of affairs. I was looking at C_ntua's comments in another thread, and sat down to do a little math to get a better understanding of it, and realized that "bc -l", the standard GNU CLI calculator, has an impoverished set of trig functions -- like, no tan(). It struck me that the only trigonometry I have done with the computer I've done in a C programming context, using the math library. But I don't need to write a program to check out a few values.

    So I thought, big woop, probably there is a nice graphical scientific calculator packaged in my distro. At first, I thought I had made a spelling mistake:

    [root~/perl] yum search trigonometry
    Warning: No matches found for: trigonometry
    No Matches found


    Kind of strange. Then I remembered using xcalc in the past, which was part of a base X windows install and had trig functions. Not anymore -- xcalc is dead!

    So I headed online. I found three candidates, they are all out of date, so neither the source nor a binary would do me any good:

    xbc -- uses gtk 1 (current version is 2)
    qmcalc -- uses Qt 3 (current version is 4)
    Archimede

    That last one is pretty interesting, take a look at this screen shot:

    Archimede: calcolatrice RPN e algebrica

    Okay, I thought, terrific, this almost looks like fun. The binary was compiled against an ancient version of X, unfortunately, but they had a sourceforge site. Guess what the losers who created and abandoned Archimede did? They created a "source package" (presumably so they could have a free Sourceforge page) and put the same unusable binary in it.

    You know what this adds up to: there is no currently maintained GUI scientific calculator for the linux platform. Please please tell me I am wrong and point me to the download.

    Maybe good news for someone tho. Here's a nice project that could easily be managed by one person, you just need to learn some gtk. And if you do a decent job, the some distro (or all of them) will probably pick it up.

    In the meantime, I guess I'm using gcc
    Last edited by MK27; 11-25-2009 at 12:33 PM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  2. #2
    Captain Crash brewbuck's Avatar
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    tan(x) = sin(x) / cos(x)
    Code:
    //try
    //{
    	if (a) do { f( b); } while(1);
    	else   do { f(!b); } while(1);
    //}

  3. #3
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brewbuck View Post
    tan(x) = sin(x) / cos(x)
    Sure, and I suppose

    sin(x) = tan(x)*cos(x)

    but so the people who wrote bc were that lazy? And then they figure the user can just do this all the time. Tch.

    I guess I could get a real calculator for like $5 or something anyway. Computers are more for stuff like this:

    http://savannah.gnu.org/projects/polyxmass

    which is in my distro. But hey, why not a decent calculator for those occasions when you forgot yours, or the battery dies or something? Does anyone intend this OS to be used for anything but servers? Imagine sitting in your school's computer lab and going look ma, no calculator.
    Last edited by MK27; 11-25-2009 at 01:06 PM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  4. #4
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    I use gcalctool. Came with my distro. Works just like a scientific calculator, and certainly has tan().

  5. #5
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberfish View Post
    I use gcalctool. Came with my distro. Works just like a scientific calculator, and certainly has tan().
    thanks cyberfish! that search led me straight to "speedcrunch" which installed fine.

    Kind of funny neither of those showed up before in my search...

    Let me google that for you

    there's more stuff there tho, than when I went looking with the word "trigonometry" -- I guess all the pages are mostly graphical and people don't understand SEO basics...
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    Or maybe they assumed they don't need to advertise having trig capabilities.

  7. #7
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberfish View Post
    Or maybe they assumed they don't need to advertise having trig capabilities.
    point -- I always aim low
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  8. #8
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    Speedcrunch looks really nice! They even advertise usability from keyboard. One thing I hated about gcalctool is that it's virtually impossible to use from the keyboard.

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    BTW, Octave is pretty nice, too. I usually use it for graphing and solving linear systems.

  10. #10
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberfish View Post
    Speedcrunch looks really nice! They even advertise usability from keyboard.
    Indeed it does. I love it exactly over that. I even hide the keypad. And it can even be used as a ticker tape calculator since if you start the next line with an operator, the variable ans gets automatically added.

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    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  11. #11
    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
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    `calc` all the way. What C programmer wouldn't want a C-style arbitrary precision calculator?


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  12. #12
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    GUI: kcalc
    CLI without fancy stuff: dc
    CLI with fancy stuff: don't bother, grab your calculator.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  13. #13
    MTK
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    Qalculate! is pretty good.

    EDIT: I just got SpeedCrunch to try, it's a very nice concept compared to most calculator applications that try to emulate a physical calculator.

    And I saw a pretty funny testimonial in the sidebar:

    Quote Originally Posted by SpeedCrunch website
    SpeedCrunch may sound like a breakfast cereal, but it's actually a very powerful open-source calculator.
    Last edited by MTK; 12-03-2009 at 06:21 PM.

  14. #14
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    I have made it a habit to use a haskell interpreter for basic math stuff (ghci). Only downside is that you cant reuse previous answer but need to type the number in again.

  15. #15
    MTK
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    That reminded me that the python interpreter makes a pretty good calculator too, and you can get history with the up key.

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