mount privileges lost

This is a discussion on mount privileges lost within the Tech Board forums, part of the Community Boards category; After installing ntfs-config I've lost the ability to mount without sudo. Tried "$sudo chmod u+s /bin/mount" but that seems to ...

  1. #1
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    mount privileges lost

    After installing ntfs-config I've lost the ability to mount without sudo.
    Tried "$sudo chmod u+s /bin/mount" but that seems to not be the problem. Purging ntfs-config doesn't seem to solve the problem either.

    What do you think I should do? (ubuntu)
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  2. #2
    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
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    Try pmount, or add the entry to /etc/fstab (what I do).

    Most people allow a group to mount (ie "storage") then chuck the user in the group.

    BTW, what is the error? You can't use the mount executable?!
    Last edited by zacs7; 10-07-2008 at 09:58 PM.

  3. #3
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    nope. I don't have privileges.

    [mariof@jupiter:~ ]$ mount /dev/sda5
    mount: only root can mount /dev/sda5 on /media/Backups
    I could install pmount. But isn't there a way to get the rights back?
    I tried to use "$ntfs-config -r" -- which apparently reverts any changes -- and then purge the package, but to no avail.

    EDIT:

    hmm... This is my fstab entry for that volume:

    /dev/sda5 /media/Backups ntfs-3g defaults,locale=en_US.UTF-8 0 0
    That ntfs-3g shouldn't be there should it? That's from the ntfs-config. My main ntfs volume sd1 -- which I can mount normally with no problems -- isn't even listed.
    Last edited by Mario F.; 10-07-2008 at 10:11 PM.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  4. #4
    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
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    There really isn't a problem. It depends how you want to do things...

    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=189783 could be a related problem.

  5. #5
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    nope. trying to mount it replies with:

    mount: can't find /dev/sda5 in /etc/fstab or /etc/mtab
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  6. #6
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    man fstab and look at the fourth field, particularly the "user" option.

  7. #7
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Thanks rob, I will when I get a chance later today. But while that may solve the problem, I'm also interested in understanding why.

    Particularly, my other ntfs volume is not present in fstab and I still can mount it with my unprivileged account.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  8. #8
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    Dunno. Perhaps if it's not in fstab, then it just matters if you have +x on mount.

  9. #9
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    I'm more curious why it worked in the first place as non-root.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  10. #10
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    This is my current fstab:

    Code:
    # /etc/fstab: static file system information.
    #
    # <file system> <mount point>   <type>  <options>       <dump>  <pass>
    proc            /proc           proc    defaults        0       0
    # /dev/sda6
    UUID=4503ecc6-deb2-4017-bb41-8af4f1d8ff5a /               ext3    relatime,errors=remount-ro 0       1
    # /dev/sda7
    UUID=22c1c8b9-2b35-45f9-aa96-6fad5394984a none            swap    sw              0       0
    /dev/scd0       /media/cdrom0   udf,iso9660 user,noauto,exec,utf8 0       0
    /dev/fd0        /media/floppy0  auto    rw,user,noauto,exec,utf8 0       0
    # /dev/sda5 /media/Backups ntfs-3g defaults,locale=en_US.UTF-8 0 0
    When booting Linux today, after yesterday troubles, I'm suddenly able to mount without sudo again. So probably purging ntfs-config required a reboot. I don't know. So the problem is pretty much solved. But I don't understand why.

    This is the result of $mount for the two ntfs volumes after I mount them through Nautilus (I can't seem to be able to mount them with the CLI):
    Code:
    /dev/sda1 on /media/disk type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,allow_other,blksize=4096)
    /dev/sda5 on /media/Backups_ type fuseblk (rw,nosuid,nodev,noatime,allow_other,blksize=4096)
    I notice it is using this 'fuseblk' and that there is a mount point (?) for it as well:
    Code:
    gvfs-fuse-daemon on /home/mariof/.gvfs type fuse.gvfs-fuse-daemon (rw,nosuid,nodev,user=mariof)
    Is this fuseblk taking over?
    Last edited by Mario F.; 10-08-2008 at 07:21 PM.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  11. #11
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    fuseblk is the FUSE (Filesystem in User SpacE or something like that) block device driver, i.e. the kernel driver that communicates with the out-of-kernel ntfs-3g driver.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  12. #12
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Ok, thanks. I was searching google for fuseblk lastnight and came up with that name. The linux lingo is still an issue and will be for some time. But at least I got my bearings.

    It's the one in control apparently and doesn't support what it calls "old style mount":
    $fusermount /dev/sda1

    I'm also unable to mount with $mount because, as I now realize, I would need an fstab entry. So the issue was not really with $mount, but with $fusemount that was restricted to root when I installed ntfs-config. Removing this package and later rebooting solved the issue. I shall read about this fuse thing sometime later when I get the stomach for it.

    ...

    I'm basically talking to myself on this post, I realize that. But also hoping if I'm saying something wrong you guys pick on it.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  13. #13
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

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