Why Mounting hides original files?

This is a discussion on Why Mounting hides original files? within the Linux Programming forums, part of the Platform Specific Boards category; Hi, I am new to unix and learning it. My question is when we mount a file system on a ...

  1. #1
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    Why Mounting hides original files?

    Hi,
    I am new to unix and learning it. My question is when we mount a file system on a directory (say "mount /dev/cdrom /opt" ) why do all the original files under /opt get hidden? Is there any way to access those files without unmounting the filesystem?
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Registered User jasrajva's Avatar
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    Oct 2001
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    you shouldnt mount it on opt
    when you do that the /dev/cdrom replaces /opt

    you should create a partit or directory called /mnt and mount everything into this

    eg /dev/cdrom goes into /mnt/cdrom
    /dev/floppy goes into /mnt/floppy
    /dev/hdawhatever goes to /mnt/c: or d: etc

  3. #3
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    Thanks but the question still remains. If I mount the filesystem, say on /mnt, why are the original files inside /mnt get hidden and can be accessed only after I have unmounted the file system.
    Thanks again.

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