C/c++ ide

This is a discussion on C/c++ ide within the Linux Programming forums, part of the Platform Specific Boards category; Hi all... Does you know a good IDE for programming in c or c++?? I am using eclipse cdt... Thx.....

  1. #1
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    C/c++ ide

    Hi all...

    Does you know a good IDE for programming in c or c++?? I am using eclipse cdt...

    Thx..

  2. #2
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    NetBeans

    it has plugins for many languages, including java, php, ruby, perl, as well as C and C++. It has versions for just about every major gui environment (windows, apple, X, etc), and projects created on one platform can be opened in netbeans on any other platform. I used KDevelop for my linux development before, and after switching to netbeans, I'll never go back to KDevelop.

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    Code::Blocks

    I love it. It's free, portable, powerful, simple, and looks so pretty. Supports C and C++, and other languages as well.

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    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    IMO, if you have not tried NOT using an IDE for a while, you should. I have no doubt that a lot of people start using one when they start programming and so are convinced it is a necessity, which by that point it probably has become so for you, which is sad.

    However, I will admit to using TkCodex which is not an IDE (no editing or compiling!), but it does index subroutines and can do directory tree searches (/usr/include anyone?), etc, etc. With that and vim*, I never seem to find myself going, "Gee, I wish I was using an integrated development environment".

    But my tastes on the desktop are unorthodox. For example, the word "integrated" is wretched; I would far, far rather use a number of different, simple, "dedicated" tools than one which is supposed to do it all for me. I am sure this "all in one integration" concept is actually derived from operating systems which only allow you one workspace.

    * which the documentation is absolutely atrocious, I am sure turning many people off because there are no clues about what you could use it for (avoid the GUI version too). But vim is the greatest piece of software of all time, bar none.
    Last edited by MK27; 04-15-2009 at 08:32 AM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    But my tastes on the desktop are unorthodox.
    I quite agree, however! Most of the people where I work uses Eclipse / FlexBuilder and Visual Studio. Yes, they look nice and it's all "integrated", but it takes people forever to actually get things done. The debuggers are horrible, IMO.

    My boss and I both use very simple text editors (he uses vim - I use notepad++ - I'm still working on my vim skills), cygwin (grep, etc...), and the command line. We compile and debug from the command-line, and it's much faster. Not as easy, but if you can program, you ought to know how to navigate such an environment.

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    I actually use a combination of both. For debugging, I compile at cygwin with a custom makefile and run gdb through the console. I find it more convenient this way. But, when it comes to everything else, Code::Blocks helps me be much faster, that with all the shortcuts and plugins. Or, at least, I'm faster than when I have to use gedit :P

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    I prefer to use just kate, which is basically a glorified editor.

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    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Pursuant to all this, I just built the new "ddd", which is a GUI frontend to gdb (and some other standard debuggers for other languages) that was left unmaintained for a long time until late last year, and in February the new developers released 3.3.12 (it seems a lot like 3.3.11, which is fine). It allows you to do stuff like point and click to add breakpoints and examine the current state of a variable with a mouseover.

    The GUI uses motif; most distros come with lesstif, which does the job. However, all available versions of lesstif contain a flaw that will break the build. I just spent an hour chasing down a patch, so if anyone runs into the same problem, here it is: remove the following lines from include/Xm/VendorSP.h:
    Code:
    at the beginning:
    #ifdef __cplusplus
    extern "C" {
    #endif 
    
    at the end:
    #ifdef __cplusplus
    }
    #endif
    ddd + TkCodex + vim + autotools = all the functionality of an IDE without the mess (do you really need to create a directory of makefiles every time you want to use your debugger, etc?)
    Last edited by MK27; 04-17-2009 at 12:43 PM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    I use Geany. It's in the repos. It has a built in terminal so you can just compile right from there. But for people who like the GUI buttons and all, it has those too. I fits me.

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    All you need is nvi, ctags, compiler and folks. I don't like vim because I don't like automatical indentation and syntax hilighting and other features like that. I know they can be disabled but with nvi I don't have to mess around to get it to a shape I want it to.

  11. #11
    Registered User Joelito's Avatar
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    For me:
    -Geany
    -KDevelop
    - Anjuta
    -codeblocks
    * PC: Intel Core 2 DUO E6550 @ 2.33 GHz with 2 GB RAM: Archlinux-i686 with xfce4.
    * Laptop: Intel Core 2 DUO T6600 @ 2.20 GHz with 4 GB RAM: Archlinux-x86-64 with xfce4.

  12. #12
    Frequently Quite Prolix dwks's Avatar
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    I use KDevelop for larger projects, and often kate when I can't be bothered with it. I also use vim from time to time, but I'm sure I'd use it more if I knew more commands. (I just discovered "dd" :P -- a.k.a CTRL-K in kate/KDevelop. That is, delete the current line.)

    I use IDEs for the features of their editors, though (KDevelop, for example, allows you to look up functions by name -- CTRL-ALT-M -- and classes -- CTRL-ALT-C -- indent many lines of code with tab, etc). I rarely use the IDE to debug or even to compile code -- the terminal's so much easier to use for that.
    Last edited by dwks; 04-21-2009 at 01:20 PM.
    dwk

    Seek and ye shall find. quaere et invenies.

    "Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it." -- Alan Perlis
    "Testing can only prove the presence of bugs, not their absence." -- Edsger Dijkstra
    "The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing." -- John Powell


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  13. #13
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    Netbeans rules :-). Kdevelop is kinda "ugly" if you're in gnome, but has about the same functionality. For small tests or practice programs I use Geany. When I am using Qt I use QDevelop.

    Visual C++ is horrible, I can't live with that monstrosity on my computer.

    When I'm developing on Windows (occasionally), I use Dev-C++. I must admit I like vim (developed by a dutch guy), but not for programming.
    Operating Systems:
    - Ubuntu 9.04
    - XP

    Compiler: gcc

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