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Company name and web address

This is a discussion on Company name and web address within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; Hello, it may be a little bit weird question but I am not a native english and sometimes I get ...

  1. #1
    Registered User MartinR's Avatar
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    Company name and web address

    Hello, it may be a little bit weird question but I am not a native english and sometimes I get confused about companies names.

    What surprised me the most is words order in companies names and for example " Apple computer" shouldn't it be "Computer apple" ? For me "Apple computer" sounds weird and no sense.

    In general which company name is more appropriate "soft x" or "x soft"?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    O_o

    If you are asking about creating a company name, you should seek the council of a lawyer. In some places the "placement", "soft x" or "x soft", is actually mandated by registration practices. In other cases, the legal name as chosen when the company is "created" is never commonly used. More generally, English tends towards placing the focus on the brand rather than the product or service so the names almost always comes first.

    However, you should call a company pretty much whatever they call themselves as a company.

    For example, you don't really have a "Apple Computer (Incorporated)". The company was renamed to simply "Apple (Incorporated)". Those titles are the legal ones, but you really never hear them outside of financial/legal fields. You will instead simply hear "Apple". The brand is more than sufficient for casual conversation.

    Soma
    “Often out of periods of losing come the greatest strivings toward a new winning streak.” -- Fred Rogers
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinR View Post
    What surprised me the most is words order in companies names and for example " Apple computer" shouldn't it be "Computer apple" ? For me "Apple computer" sounds weird and no sense.
    Apple is the name (or trademark) of the company, and computer is the product. So "Apple computer" means "a computer manufactured/sold/delivered/produced/supplied by Apple". But it can mean other things. Sometimes trademarks are strung together from a set of words regardless of their literal meaning.

    Quote Originally Posted by MartinR View Post
    In general which company name is more appropriate "soft x" or "x soft"?
    Depends what "x" is, and what "soft" means (it is a word with various meanings, not all of them equivalent, and can also be other things such as an acronym). Either can be appropriate depending on context - and sometimes both are appropriate for either the same purpose or different purposes.
    Right 98% of the time, and don't care about the other 3%.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grumpy View Post
    So "Apple computer" means "a computer manufactured/sold/delivered/produced/supplied by Apple
    Of Course but from grammatical point of view and the way it sounds shouldn't it be called "Computer Apple" istead ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinR View Post
    Of Course but from grammatical point of view and the way it sounds shouldn't it be called "Computer Apple" istead ?
    My comment was from a grammatical point of view. The second word is the type of item, the first is a qualifier/specifier (or trademark in this case).

    A computer trademarked by Dell is called a Dell Computer, not a Computer Dell.
    Last edited by grumpy; 05-24-2014 at 08:01 AM.
    Right 98% of the time, and don't care about the other 3%.

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    Registered User MartinR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grumpy View Post
    The second word is the type of item, the first is a qualifier/specifier (or trademark in this case).
    What about companies which break this rule, and call their company like
    "softweb" or "softx" example softnyx.com. I am mainly talking about domain names but I think it is resonable to register your company with the same name as domain or at least keep the same words order.

    Take another example which brakes your rule "hostnine.com" here first word define company service and the second is trademark.

    If they would named their company "ninehost.com" people still might know that this is host related company but for me hostnine sounds much more better than ninehost. The same problema applies for apple computer, I think they named it that because it sounds better then "Computer apple".

    If somebody going to register company with key words "soft" and "x" decide to name it softx since it sounds better the xsoft.

    Am I right ?

    How it sounds for you ? For me sounds more logical

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    If you wanted a site concerned with large dogs, would you name it bigdog or dogbig?
    Right 98% of the time, and don't care about the other 3%.

  8. #8
    Registered User MartinR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grumpy View Post
    If you wanted a site concerned with large dogs, would you name it bigdog or dogbig?
    In this case only bigdog is reasonable, sounds good and meaning is ok. But take facebook as an example, it sounds good but meaning is worst than bookface. So facebook won with bookface because sounds better.

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    Unregistered User Yarin's Avatar
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    MartinR, it does not matter what order "sounds good", in English, the qualifier always precedes the object.

    Here are some possible meanings of the names depending on their component's order...

    Apple computer -> Computer made by Apple
    Computer Apple -> An apple that computes
    Facebook -> Book of faces
    Bookface -> Face that looks like a book
    Bigdog -> Dog that is big
    Dogbig -> Big in a way that a dig is
    MartinR and Sebastiani like this.
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    Registered User MartinR's Avatar
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    Thank you Yarin,

    How do you consider comapny name "Soft X" and "X Soft" ?

    where x is not defined.

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    Unregistered User Yarin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinR View Post
    How do you consider comapny name "Soft X" and "X Soft" ?
    As grumpy said, it depends. Assuming by soft you mean software, it would almost certainly be "X Soft".

    In practice though, you might want to name your business "X Software" instead, or if you insist on using "soft", "Xsoft" (as one word).
    Examples: Oasys Software, Idyllic Software, Sheppard Software, Boolsoft, Microsoft, Comsoft
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    Registered User MartinR's Avatar
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    Thanks, it was very helpful

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    If you're trying to name a company don't forget to search to see if someone is already using the name you wish to use and perhaps has a trademark for your proposed name. There already seems to be a "company' with the name of "xsoft" for example that may have relevance if you happen to be within the same industry.

    Jim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yarin View Post
    As grumpy said, it depends. Assuming by soft you mean software, it would almost certainly be "X Soft".

    In practice though, you might want to name your business "X Software" instead, or if you insist on using "soft", "Xsoft" (as one word).
    Examples: Oasys Software, Idyllic Software, Sheppard Software, Boolsoft, Microsoft, Comsoft
    Soft is also a word in its own right, with meanings such as "yielding readily", "compliant", "subdued", "agreeable". So a company that produces and sells music to sooth savage beasts and babies in cribs might use a name like "Soft Muse" rather than "Muse Soft".
    Right 98% of the time, and don't care about the other 3%.

  15. #15
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    O_o

    As I've already said, call a company what the company wants to be called.

    If you are naming a company, call it by whatever you like within the limits of the law.

    You can't just call a thing by what "sounds better"; you may wind up not even talking about the same thing.

    For example, "Computer King", "Software King", "King Software", and "King Computers" are all separate businesses.

    Soma
    “Often out of periods of losing come the greatest strivings toward a new winning streak.” -- Fred Rogers
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer

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