Tips for taking the ACT as a high school sophomore?

This is a discussion on Tips for taking the ACT as a high school sophomore? within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; Even though the standard of taking the test normally recommends to wait until you are a junior or senior in ...

  1. #1
    Registered User HelpfulPerson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Over the rainbow
    Posts
    288

    Tips for taking the ACT as a high school sophomore?

    Even though the standard of taking the test normally recommends to wait until you are a junior or senior in high school to try the test, I want to take it earlier. In doing so, I'm aware that I could be demotivated if I don't get a decent score, but I'm going to try to not let any possibility of that slow me down. Obviously I won't have as near as much experience as I need, but I am determined to at least get the "look and feel" of the test early. Even so, I still want to try to do my best, and keep advancing no matter what score I get. At least if I take it now, there won't be as much pressure, and I can always have two more tries as a junior and a senior.

    As such, I came to here hoping that some of the older forumers here might know a thing or two that could help me complete the test accurately. I also would like some suggestions on what sites/things I can do to prepare. I would evaluate myself as being strongest in literature categories, strong in science, but I'm not the strongest in math. From what I've read searching on google for some information, the mathematics portion will consist of geometry, some algebra, and trigonometry. I had a geometry class, and passed it with an A, but I hardly remember the concepts and I didn't understand some of it. As far as trig goes, I'm a blank slate. Algebra would be my most solid foundation in math, and the kind of math I understand well. If anyone can suggest any nice sites that will help me improve my math speeds, along with refreshing my geometry skills and learning some basic trig, that would be nice.

    I'm very determined to try and pass the test, because my family doesn't have enough money to pay for my college. I would like to major in Computer Science without student loans weighing me down. I appreciate any help that I receive here so I can at least do my best.
    "Some people think they can outsmart me, maybe. Maybe. I've yet to meet one that can outsmart bullet" - Meet the Heavy, Team Fortress 2

  2. #2
    and the hat of copycat stevesmithx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    493
    Quote Originally Posted by HelpfulPerson View Post
    Even though the standard of taking the test normally recommends to wait until you are a junior or senior in high school to try the test, I want to take it earlier. In doing so, I'm aware that I could be demotivated if I don't get a decent score, but I'm going to try to not let any possibility of that slow me down. Obviously I won't have as near as much experience as I need, but I am determined to at least get the "look and feel" of the test early. Even so, I still want to try to do my best, and keep advancing no matter what score I get. At least if I take it now, there won't be as much pressure, and I can always have two more tries as a junior and a senior.

    As such, I came to here hoping that some of the older forumers here might know a thing or two that could help me complete the test accurately. I also would like some suggestions on what sites/things I can do to prepare. I would evaluate myself as being strongest in literature categories, strong in science, but I'm not the strongest in math. From what I've read searching on google for some information, the mathematics portion will consist of geometry, some algebra, and trigonometry. I had a geometry class, and passed it with an A, but I hardly remember the concepts and I didn't understand some of it. As far as trig goes, I'm a blank slate. Algebra would be my most solid foundation in math, and the kind of math I understand well. If anyone can suggest any nice sites that will help me improve my math speeds, along with refreshing my geometry skills and learning some basic trig, that would be nice.

    I'm very determined to try and pass the test, because my family doesn't have enough money to pay for my college. I would like to major in Computer Science without student loans weighing me down. I appreciate any help that I receive here so I can at least do my best.
    If you have got time on your hand, and video learning is your thing,
    https://www.khanacademy.org/ is one good site to learn, IMO.
    Disclaimer: There were some people reporting inaccuracies in Khan's videos. So learn at your own risk if you choose to.
    Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted
    - Albert Einstein.


    No programming language is perfect. There is not even a single best language; there are only languages well suited or perhaps poorly suited for particular purposes.
    - Herbert Mayer

  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Long Beach, CA
    Posts
    5,444
    I will prefix this by saying: I only took the SAT, not the ACT, and that was 15 years ago or so. But I think, for your questions, what I say here is fairly applicable.

    Starting to study early for the test is a good thing. IMO, however, taking the test early is not so good. You have a lot of ground to cover, learning all the trig for the test, and filling the holes in your geometry skills. The "less pressure" argument pales in comparison to being better prepared. Besides, the odds of you doing exceptionally well you first time is probably not that great (I'm not saying you'll bomb, but you probably wont kick a$$ either). That means there would be more pressure, because you then you will only have two shots left. Get as much preparation as possible before taking the test. Actually take a trig class. It might even reinforce some of your geometry and definitely will your algebra.

    As far as the college money thing goes, I know it's expensive (proportionally even more so than when I went to school). However, there are lots of scholarships and grants available, both need-based and merit-based. There's also student loans, which require repayment, but generally have fairly decent payment terms (i.e. small monthly payments). And if you're studying CS, you will likely get a decent job and make plenty of money to pay off your loans. If your need is really extreme, there are even government grants -- free money -- for school. There are also companies who will pay for some or all of your education if you work for them while in school (sometimes there are stipulations but they're usually reasonable). I know Bank of America used to do that, not sure about now. Also, some tech companies may pay part of your tuition on the promise that you work for them for a year or two afterward. I know you can't just ignore the issue, but I don't think it's worth worrying about too much when you are going into a profitable field like CS. If you were considering a literature or history major, that might be different.

    All that being said, there are online resources, like stevesmithx mentioned. There are also books, like Schaum's Outlines series and many others, that are very specific to standardized tests like ACT or SAT. Your school probably has a guidance counselor that you can talk to as well for more advice. For all you know, your school may have some prep courses/material.

    That's all that comes to mind at the moment, I'm sure more stuff will pop into my head at some point, but I have to get back to work.

  4. #4
    Epy
    Epy is offline
    Fortran lover Epy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    949
    I took the SAT instead of the ACT as well. If you're good at programming, you're probably good at math and logic, etc. The parts I had trouble with were the vocabulary parts, e.g. analogies using complicated words I don't give a ........ about. I'd just buy a decently rated study book and review word definitions off a practice test.

  5. #5
    Captain Crash brewbuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    7,235
    Ironically, the only question I missed on my SAT was in the math part. Just one question away from a perfect score... argh.
    Code:
    //try
    //{
    	if (a) do { f( b); } while(1);
    	else   do { f(!b); } while(1);
    //}

Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Textbook for High School Students
    By mbeebe in forum General Discussions
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-19-2009, 08:40 AM
  2. Taking it back to the old school...well I'm on my way at least!
    By Stonehambey in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-13-2008, 01:39 AM
  3. Help for a High School Student!
    By KoG Metalgod in forum C Programming
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-20-2006, 07:25 AM
  4. I've been slacking off in high school, am I going to hell
    By Silvercord in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 06-01-2003, 01:00 PM
  5. What should I do my first day out of Senior High School?
    By incognito in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-19-2002, 07:08 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21