Like Tree21Likes

A New Reason to Hate Windows

This is a discussion on A New Reason to Hate Windows within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; Originally Posted by whiteflags It is entirely a windows fault, because of what a file extension really is in windows. ...

  1. #31
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    22,604
    Quote Originally Posted by whiteflags View Post
    It is entirely a windows fault, because of what a file extension really is in windows. The only other API function that needs to be called, if you use an application to change file associations, is SHChangeNotify function (Windows). If an application has permission to change the registry, which it does sometimes, under the UAC model, then it can change file associations.
    I know they can, which is one of the reasons desktop if broken today. Programs have access to change whatever they bloody want, while they should not.
    So again, in my opinion, it is a Windows fault and an API faulty, but essentially we are agreeing on the same here, just with different views of whose fault it is.

    Also, regarding touch screens. Imagine a 42 inch TV sitting roughly ˝-1 meter away from you. Then imagine Windows being entirely touch screen. No mouse. No keyboard.
    Oh goodie, now I must get close to the TV (which is not a touch screen, btw) in order to do something or type something.
    Or, you know, I could just use the mouse and it done in much less time it takes me to get close and stretch out my hand.
    Now add to that that today's touch screens just aren't responsive enough to capture quick keyboard typing, and they get full of smudges and it gets just tiresome to do that in front of a computer all the time.
    Nah. I agree with others have said with touch screens; I'm sticking with mouse & keyboard. Windows 8 is such a disaster in so many ways IMO.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  2. #32
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    7,467
    Windows already handles file type associations by letting you specify what programs can open it. It's ungraceful, I'll agree. But it is so because the filesystem itself doesn't try to make a distinction between file types. NTFS ACEs are inadequate for this purpose. I suppose any of you could argue it's the task of the OS to provide that functionality. I argue that it would be much easier if the filesystem itself carried associations information, fully removing from the context even the need to define a file extension. Get a filetype aware filesystem with full metadata support and have your API expose the necessary functionality and you have your problem gracefully solved.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  3. #33
    Registered User C_ntua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,853
    Quote Originally Posted by Cat View Post
    User fatigue. Keyboards and mice are actually fairly well designed in terms of being operable with the hands in a neutral, supported position, and even they can lead to repetitive strain injuries. While some of our muscles evolved to be in nearly constant use (the postural muscles, for example), our arms and hands simply aren't evolved to be held up unsupported for many hours in a row.
    That assumes that you are using a device that requires user input for a long period of time. Typically, you are most likely doing professional work on a desktop. I can press on the screen to launch my programming environment and then use my mouse, the touchscreen doesn't prevent this. When I give my laptop to my kid or wife to watch a movie then the mouse is required to select it where it would have been more convenient just to use a touchscreen.

    To put it better, I believe that there is a good chance that touchscreens will be a commodity if companies push the market as such. So most devices might have it. In that case it makes more sense for me for the main input to be touchscreen based as you might not have or cannot use a mouse. The touchscreen will always be there. I don't thing there is a disagreement that for each device a more specialized OS is better for the users, but if I am the one that needs to develop those specialized OS I rather push for one as, it benefits me the programmer.

    The keyboard is another story. That is hard to replace and voice recognition seems the only alternative but it seems very far away to actually be able to replace a keyboard (and good luck translating my accent...). If a touchscreen though is present in every laptop and OS, applications and webpages supports them enough then it is likely that you see laptops being like a tablet with the keyboard as a separate piece. A mouse just optional.

  4. #34
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    7,467
    Quote Originally Posted by C_ntua View Post
    That assumes that you are using a device that requires user input for a long period of time. Typically, you are most likely doing professional work on a desktop. I can press on the screen to launch my programming environment and then use my mouse, the touchscreen doesn't prevent this.
    And yet, it does. If, or when, we get a common way to handle both mouse and touchscreen input in code, then maybe I'll concede to you (for sure I see an increase in productivity if I could handle my application input with both my right hand on the mouse and my left hand on the screen when dealing with typical lengthy mouse operations). But until then it's very unlikely Windows programmers will want or remember to handle both input devices because of the code replication it entails.

    Quote Originally Posted by C_ntua View Post
    To put it better, I believe that there is a good chance that touchscreens will be a commodity if companies push the market as such.
    I'm skeptic. For one, the Touchscreen technology hasn't proved to be the life and marriage savior it was marketed as. It's cumbersome to some people and it's been the source of more difficulties to physically disabled people than the mouse/keyboard ever were. Another reason is that Touchscreen is notoriously more prone to invoke medical conditions. Finally touchscreens the size of modern computer screens are much more expensive to build (and purchase), making the possibility of mass adoption very unlikely for a long while.
    whiteflags likes this.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  5. #35
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,259
    For one, the Touchscreen technology hasn't proved to be the life and marriage savior it was marketed as.
    O_o

    I always think of 3D, virtual reality, motion controls, and touch controls as the fad that just wouldn't die.

    Seriously, why can't we just kill this "the future of" crap and stick with the things that, you know, actually work!?

    Soma

  6. #36
    Internet Superhero
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    964
    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    Seriously, why can't we just kill this "the future of" crap and stick with the things that, you know, actually work!?
    Hmmm, if everyone thought like that, wouldn't we all still be watching VHS tapes at home and riding chariots to work?
    Elysia likes this.
    How I need a drink, alcoholic in nature, after the heavy lectures involving quantum mechanics.

  7. #37
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    4,259
    Hmmm, if everyone thought like that, wouldn't we all still be watching VHS tapes at home and riding chariots to work?
    O_o

    ^- Actually, that face is probably sufficient to my purposes.

    Soma
    Last edited by phantomotap; 12-17-2012 at 01:40 PM.
    Mario F. likes this.

  8. #38
    Internet Superhero
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    964
    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    O_o

    ^- Actually, that face is probably sufficient to my purposes.

    Soma
    I apologize, for the confusion, allow me to illustrate.

    http://i.imgur.com/xAeld.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Elkvis likes this.
    How I need a drink, alcoholic in nature, after the heavy lectures involving quantum mechanics.

  9. #39
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    7,467
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo1 View Post
    Hmmm, if everyone thought like that, wouldn't we all still be watching VHS tapes at home and riding chariots to work?
    No Neo, we wouldn't. I really am bored already with this type of argumentation every time someone as much as hints at the idea that some progress may be flawed. It never occurred to you this is a typical straw man (Reductio ad absurdum)?

    I'll answer you in what I hope is a more constructive way than what you put up here:

    No, we wouldn't. Once you separate the essential from the accessory. And if you think, "but who says what is essential?", that's exactly the point. No one and everyone. That's why everyone is allowed to have their own ideas of what is and isn't essential.
    Last edited by Mario F.; 12-17-2012 at 04:56 PM.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  10. #40
    Internet Superhero
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    964
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    No Neo, we wouldn't. I really am bored already with this type of argumentation every time someone as much as hints at the idea that some progress may be flawed.
    Countless scientific or engineering breakthroughs have been made by pursuing something that even the inventor thought of as non-essential at the time, but which later on changed the world. The thought that we could just stop pursuing non-essential research and development, and not be worse off, seems naive at best.

    It never occurred to you this is a typical straw man (Reductio ad absurdum)?
    It certainly did not, since i never intended to make a serious point about the matter.

    I'll answer you in what I hope is a more constructive way than what you put up here:
    You should try and be less constructive sometimes, it's really constructive!
    How I need a drink, alcoholic in nature, after the heavy lectures involving quantum mechanics.

  11. #41
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    7,467
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo1 View Post
    Countless scientific or engineering breakthroughs have been made by pursuing something that even the inventor thought of as non-essential at the time, but which later on changed the world. The thought that we could just stop pursuing non-essential research and development, and not be worse off, seems naive at best.
    Riight. No countless bad inventions and technological dead ends. Those you wisely choose to omit from your logic.

    I feel like putting your argumentation in the toilet.
    The Middle Show: Pay Toilet - YouTube
    (BTW, not shown here, but it also had the interesting habit of automatically open the door when the time was up)
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  12. #42
    Internet Superhero
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    964
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    Riight. No countless bad inventions and technological dead ends. Those you wisely choose to omit from your logic.
    I said countless, i never said all. In fact i never even said the majority. Invention works through trial-and-error, please enlighten me, how would you propose we dropped all the bad inventions and only worked towards the good and succesful ones? All the good stuff is built using the experience we gain from coming up with useless or bad stuff. The entire field of chemistry originated from something as greedy and pointless as alchemy, just to name one thing.

    I feel like putting your argumentation in the toilet.
    My argumentation is bad, so it should be a breeze for you to respond to it rather than dodge it.

    Countless scientific or engineering breakthroughs have been made by pursuing something that even the inventor thought of as non-essential at the time, but which later on changed the world. The thought that we could just stop pursuing non-essential research and development, and not be worse off, seems naive at best.

    The Middle Show: Pay Toilet - YouTube
    (BTW, not shown here, but it also had the interesting habit of automatically open the door when the time was up)
    Red herring - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    How I need a drink, alcoholic in nature, after the heavy lectures involving quantum mechanics.

  13. #43
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    7,467
    What's the emoticon for flapping my hand imitating a duck quacking?
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  14. #44
    Internet Superhero
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    964
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    What's the emoticon for flapping my hand imitating a duck quacking?
    Talk about being constructive.

    Here, this should help!

    Anyone have tips for getting sand out of a vagina? - Yahoo! Answers
    How I need a drink, alcoholic in nature, after the heavy lectures involving quantum mechanics.

  15. #45
    Registered User C_ntua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,853
    Let me get back my claim of touchscreens replacing the mouse. I can also agree that for the next 5 years lets say desktop monitors will not be in the majority touchscreens, making the mouse mandatory.

    All the projections I have seen show that desktop will sales will decrease a lot compared to tablets, notebooks and laptops. That means that the majority of devices won't be desktops. Thus from MS point of view it makes sense that the main focus of Windows won't be desktops. So let us talk about laptops, as tablets and smartphones cannot really replace a desktop for business. Do you think that a touchscreens will be a standard future for laptops in the near future? Lets say at least 30% of laptops will have it in the next 3-5 years.

    For my profession I use my laptop in a lot of ways. Usually it is docked attached to a mouse and keyboard and two monitors. I also use it while travelling for business. I use it for presentations. Except when I am on a desk having it docked, I would benefit from a touchscreen. When my laptop is on a desk and I am standing to make a presentation the mouse stops becoming ergonomic for example. Most of the time I am on a desk, but still the remaining time is long enough to benefit me using a touchscreen, even if the main input overall will be a mouse.

    Apart from that I prefer to use a keyboard than a mouse and a mouse than a touchscreen. I would love if OS became more keyboard oriented, but the moment I cannot sit on a desk to type that device becomes cumbersome.

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Another reason why I hate life
    By BobMcGee123 in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 11-11-2006, 09:04 AM
  2. If you hate windows explorer....
    By misplaced in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-12-2005, 07:38 AM
  3. Is there any reason?
    By Blanket in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-18-2003, 05:05 PM
  4. Another reason to not like America
    By Shiro in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 129
    Last Post: 06-13-2002, 12:11 PM
  5. How can you reason with this madman?
    By EvenFlow in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 10-11-2001, 06:51 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21