Gadhafi regime crumbling

This is a discussion on Gadhafi regime crumbling within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/23/wo...3libya.html?hp Live blog: Intense fighting near Gadhafi stronghold – This Just In - CNN.com Blogs Not going to lie, I ...

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    Gadhafi regime crumbling

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/23/wo...3libya.html?hp

    Live blog: Intense fighting near Gadhafi stronghold – This Just In - CNN.com Blogs

    Not going to lie, I feel excited about this situation. I also suspect Obama will go down as being one of the best foreign policy presidents in modern US history.

    Discuss.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

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    Well, destroying an old regime is one thing, but building a better one after that is usually harder. Just look at what was happening in history with all the revolutions and popular movements. Sometimes it turns into a nightmare, sometimes everything stays the same, only one oppressor replaces another. Or look at what is going on these days for example in Iraq!?!

    But you have to make the first step at some point. I hope it all goes for the better.

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    Couldn't agree more. Hopefully it's a good sign that the rebels didn't just hang Gadhafi's sons right in the street. This way they'll be hung professionally in the Hague.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

  4. #4
    &TH of undefined behavior Fordy's Avatar
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    I'm not that excited about it as I fear that one tyranny may well replace another

    Libyan rebels say Islamist militia shot dead military chief General Abdel Fattah Younes - Telegraph

    An Islamist faction, allied to the revolution decided to kill their main general even before the revolution was complete.

    Change is only as good as what replaces it.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobMcGee123 View Post
    I also suspect Obama will go down as being one of the best foreign policy presidents in modern US history.
    Discuss.
    Why...what's he done here?

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobMcGee123 View Post
    I also suspect Obama will go down as being one of the best foreign policy presidents in modern US history.
    It's possible. That's not even close to being a competitive championship.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fordy View Post
    I'm not that excited about it as I fear that one tyranny may well replace another
    That's my feeling too. But it's always a good day when a dictator falls somewhere on the planet.

    ...
    In a side note, in recent years many democratic leaders shook hands with Gaddafi. I won't forget for instance the personal shame and outrage I felt when he visited my country in 2007, was received by a 200 people delegation mostly composed of business men, and shook hands with our prime minister at the time, José Socrates. All in the name of him buying some of our debt. Other notable figures that in recent years did the same include Nicolas Sarkozy, Jose Luis Zapatero (and King Juan Carlos, btw), or Silvio Berlusconi.

    If these people had any blood running in their veins, instead of being the hypocrite bastards they must be to win elections, they would feel ashamed of themselves right now. But we aren't that lucky.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Why...what's he done here?
    A skillful political balancing act. I believe Gadhafi's regime would not have fallen without NATO help, and it's not clear NATO would have acted without US support, and suffice it to say it would've been disastrous for the U.S. to act alone (after the debacle in Iraq and our generally low standing in the world).

    One can only imagine what it'll turn into during the campaign because I'm not sure most Americans really approved of it, just sort of went along for the ride.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

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    In a side note, in recent years many democratic leaders shook hands with Gaddafi
    Didn't Obama, too?

    EDIT:
    prime minister at the time, José Socrates
    (Side note: My mom's a first generation immigrant (not from the mainland though, she was born on San Miguel)).
    Last edited by BobMcGee123; 08-22-2011 at 02:12 PM.
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

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    &TH of undefined behavior Fordy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobMcGee123 View Post
    A skillful political balancing act. I believe Gadhafi's regime would not have fallen without NATO help, and it's not clear NATO would have acted without US support, and suffice it to say it would've been disastrous for the U.S. to act alone (after the debacle in Iraq and our generally low standing in the world).

    One can only imagine what it'll turn into during the campaign because I'm not sure most Americans really approved of it, just sort of went along for the ride.
    There was a time when it was said that he was 'dragging his feet' - US 'dragging their feet' on Gaddafi | Latest News Stories | Your Online African Community | Portal To Africa

    I cant see him winning a Nobel Prize for this...but then he already had one...

  9. #9
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobMcGee123 View Post
    Didn't Obama, too?
    I was more concerned with European leaders. Missed the adjective there to make it more clear. We are largely responsible for his 40 year rulership. I'm not familar with Obama's history with this man, but their famous handshake that would make Reagan turn on his grave was -- fortunately for Obama -- given on an entire different context. It was during a G8 summit and the "mad dog" was unfortunately the president of the African Union. Obama couldn't have avoided it.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobMcGee123 View Post
    (Side note: My mom's a first generation immigrant (not from the mainland though, she was born on San Miguel)).
    Ah. Azores was a prolific immigrant source during the authoritative regime here. I believe it makes for the largest Portuguese community in USA and a sizeable number stayed and took roots. There's nothing like that to demonstrate a success story and nothing sadder than immigrants returning. Do send her my regards.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    I cant see him winning a Nobel Prize for this...but then he already had one...
    Haha, I totally forgot about that. Wasn't that proximal to the Afghanistan troop surge? Man that was an embarrassment.


    I was more concerned with European leaders. Missed the adjective there to make it more clear. We are largely responsible for his 40 year rulership
    I guess I don't know that history, I'm guessing oil was a/the factor.

    It was during a G8 summit and the "mad dog" was unfortunately the president of the African Union. Obama couldn't have avoided it.
    Ah, I didn't know that either.

    I believe it makes for the largest Portuguese community in USA and a sizeable number stayed and took roots
    And then some of them churned out difficult children! ("Mom, sup, Mario F. on cprogramming says hi. Yes, THAT Mario")
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

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    Now they're claiming the sons NOT captured...this is getting just plain schizophrenic.
    Live blog: Gadhafi son reappears in Tripoli – This Just In - CNN.com Blogs
    I'm not immature, I'm refined in the opposite direction.

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