Some advice in setting my Linux dev environment

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  1. #1
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Some advice in setting my Linux dev environment

    Well, the time has come for me to start plagging Linux with my buggy applications. Have been learning and reading a lot about Linux, and I think have reached a certain level of confidence that allows me to take the plunge and start developing in Linux too. Something I long have had a wish for.

    My preferred development environment is:
    . i3 WM
    . Vim
    . gcc/g++/gdb

    My targets will be:
    . Console (emphasis here)
    . GTK+, but almost probably wxWidgets

    I need your more experienced advise on what other tools do you think I should be using (that you use and feel handy).
    Last edited by Mario F.; 08-24-2010 at 10:20 AM.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  2. #2
    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    I've never been "old-school" enough to feel comfortable developing in VIM. I prefer a more rich development environment. I know all of the VIM fanatics are going to scold me and explain to me just how rich VIM can actually be... but when I have messed around with software development in Linux, it's typically been in KDevelop or Eclipse. Though I will admit I really didn't do my research as to what is the best IDE for Linux under a graphical user interface, I just picked up the first thing I could find that wasn't VIM or Emacs.
    Sent from my iPad®

  3. #3
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    No worries. You won't hear a peep from me. I'm not into any of the typical linux user tantrics. (except to note perhaps that there's hardly a community so demoralizing and full of prejudice as the Linux community as a whole). Loving the OS and its tools. But can't stand the people.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  4. #4
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    I don't use anything other than vim, gcc and gdb (and their equivalents for other languages) via command line, all running inside the GUI (with Chrome housing my documentation/reference materials). But then, I'm one of "those people".

    You can certainly get the job done just with what you have listed, but we can probably give you better advice if we know how you like to develop now. What did you use, and what did you like / dislike about it? The primary motivations for my current set up (which is about the same as what you're proposing) are my desire for lightweight tools, an understanding of what's really going on under the surface, keyboard controls for everything, dark color schemes etc... VIM and the other tools make all that work well for me. I also like being able to switch to working through SSH or on a non-GUI machine, and not have to adjust much at all.

  5. #5
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    I also use Vim, gcc/g++, gdb and make aswell. You probably want some version control (I use svn, but not an advanced user..just the normal checkout and commit usually). The reason i dont use an IDE for my development comes from the fact that after a while i learned that i dont need it...i want multiple docs open in one vim session, np. Plus I can lay it out the way I want..when i program i usually have at least 4 consoles open on the workspace im working on, 2 vim sessions; one with all .h files open and one with all .cpp files open and i have found this to be completely godsend.

  6. #6
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Sean,
    Well, my motivations are pretty much like yours. With the emphasis on the "keeping a system that allows me to learn how things work under the hood", since I'm a linux newb and that's the way I like to learn things.

    I'm hoping for general advise regarding these type of Linux development environments; mostly tools or special setups you found particularly useful along the years. I'm also particularly eager for tips regarding gdb integration in a tiling WM.

    Shakti,
    Yeah, forgot to mention. I use SVN too. Thanks for the advise on vim.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  7. #7
    ... kermit's Avatar
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    Depending on what distribution you have, you will want to install the man pages. I like to have a bit of KDE installed as well - that way I can use Konqueror to view man pages - this works out pretty nice sometimes, if I want to keep a few man pages open for reference, or if a particular page is really long.

  8. #8
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    O_o

    I'm I the only one showing "nano" some love?

    If you are really going mainly console, try out "retawq".

    except to note perhaps that there's hardly a community so demoralizing and full of prejudice as the Linux community as a whole
    I'd say that you've not yet met the right people. Some communities actually do take the "freedom" thing to heart and will not .......... about your use of a particular tool.

    Soma

  9. #9
    Woof, woof! zacs7's Avatar
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    I've walked the plain vim and gcc/g++ route. It's fine for simple things, but at the end of the day you're just bolting features onto an advanced text editor.

    I now use eclipse with a vim plugin, i'm done trying to make vim something it's not. That being said, I still use it a lot - especially for perl and bash.

  10. #10
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Checked Konqueror and it's dependency list is indeed a little too much for what will become essentially just a man page viewer. Were I not running Linux on a tight 10Gb disk and I would probably go with it, Kermit. Thanks.

    I'd say that you've not yet met the right people. Some communities actually do take the "freedom" thing to heart and will not .......... about your use of a particular tool.
    Indeed. It's a self-imposed paradox, that which a considerable portion of the Linux population lives in. Often inspired by the very people they look up to.

    I've walked the plain vim and gcc/g++ route. It's fine for simple things, but at the end of the day you're just bolting features onto an advanced text editor.

    I now use eclipse with a vim plugin, i'm done trying to make vim something it's not. That being said, I still use it a lot - especially for perl and bash.
    Vim is actually working for me. I'm quite surprised; I'm not even a touch typist!
    But I don't let myself be fooled by it and I can see many areas where it is indeed completely surpassed by a graphical text editor. It's however working for me, I believe because I really want it to. The console has always been a powerful beckon to me. It's where I like to be the most.

    Given the type of software I plan to develop, it's also an adequate environment. I'm also running Openbox for proper testing of GTK+ applications and for those leisure moments. But I'm actually quite happy with the console for the blunt of my Linux experience.

    But don't be fooled. I like to pretify it
    https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic....810901#p810901
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  11. #11
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    Valgrind is a very useful memory debugger only available for Linux.
    Valgrind Home

    And there's gprof for profiling.

  12. #12
    Unregistered User Yarin's Avatar
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    If you are interested in an IDE, I really like Code::Blocks (I'm surprised no one has mentioned it yet). It multi-platform, and supports GCC and G++.
    A class that doesn't overload all operators just isn't finished yet. -- SmugCeePlusPlusWeenie
    A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God. -- Alan J. Perlis

  13. #13
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Know all about valgring and gprof already. Beautiful stuff!

    Not really interested in an IDE. Assuming my present love affair with Linux keeps its course, I may in the future be either totally interested or totally uninterested in a graphical IDE. It will depend on how successful I become in Vim. But if I eventually find that I want one, Code::Blocks will however not be it. On that department I already know what I want, what I need and what I like; SlickEdit.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  14. #14
    Registered User valaris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    But don't be fooled. I like to pretify it
    https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic....810901#p810901
    That looks really nice and un-cluttered. I think I'll try it out this weekend.

  15. #15
    Unregistered User Yarin's Avatar
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    Nice, but, isn't a little dark, Mario? I can barely see it clearly with my screen, yours must be quite bright.

    If I may: What do you like so much about SlickEdit? i.e., what does it do/have that you can't live without?
    A class that doesn't overload all operators just isn't finished yet. -- SmugCeePlusPlusWeenie
    A year spent in artificial intelligence is enough to make one believe in God. -- Alan J. Perlis

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