Windows DVD Maker?

This is a discussion on Windows DVD Maker? within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; I'm wondering if anyone knows why Windows DVD Maker does this? 1. It only lets you record 150 minutes of ...

  1. #1
    and the hat of sweating
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    Windows DVD Maker?

    I'm wondering if anyone knows why Windows DVD Maker does this?

    1. It only lets you record 150 minutes of video on a DVD, even if the total file size is WAY less then 4GB? Shouldn't it let you store as much video as you have room for?
    2. I already converted my .avi files to .VOB files which are supposedly in DVD format, but Windows DVD Maker still spends 30-60 mins "encoding" the data before it even starts writing to the DVD. What the hell does it need to encode?
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Isn't the 150 minute limit imposed by the standard? I suspect you'll need to either create a dual-layer disk or use another program that allows for time compression... at the expense of quality.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Registered User carrotcake1029's Avatar
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    I have always used the following freeware to author DVDs. I can't recall though if it allowed for content more than 150 mins per DVD though. I really haven't authored a DVD in years.

    home (favcfavc)

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    Isn't the 150 minute limit imposed by the standard? I suspect you'll need to either create a dual-layer disk or use another program that allows for time compression... at the expense of quality.
    Why would the standard impose a time limit? Wouldn't it make more sense to let people put as much data on the DVD as they can fit?
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

    "the internet is a scary place to be thats why i dont use it much." - billet, 03/17/2010

  5. #5
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    My answer is I don't know. I just know that normal single-layer disks are limited to 150 minutes without compression. You get the same type of limitations if you try to make audio CDs for instance. I'm not much into this stuff. I never even once made a movie DVD or a audio CD for that matter. But my guess is this is just a normal limitation when CD/DVDs are read by their traditional devices as data limitations are to our computers when we are making data CD/DVDs. But I confess my total ignorance on this area.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  6. #6
    Just a pushpin. bernt's Avatar
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    My guess is that the makers of that program figured it would be more natural for their users to think of DVD space in terms of time rather than data. There isn't a limit on the length of video on a dvd, though, since every DVD player has to decode the MPEG file anyways.

    There is a limit on bitrate in the sense that it can't be over 9.8 MB/s, but nothing says you can't drop it as low as you want. The reason commercial movie DVDs don't ever run over 2 hours per layer is that the producers don't want to sacrifice quality (that's what DVDs are... well, now there are Blu-Rays... but that's what DVDs were all about).

    Unfortunately DVD maker doesn't seem to have a bitrate option. I would suggest other software but I have no idea what else there is (maybe Avidemux + Dvdstyler?).

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