Your views on computer specs

This is a discussion on Your views on computer specs within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; Because memory cannot keep up! Processors are leaky and that's why they evolve so fast. Memory cannot be leaky, which ...

  1. #31
    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    Because memory cannot keep up! Processors are leaky and that's why they evolve so fast.
    Memory cannot be leaky, which is one of the biggest problems.
    Would you please define "leaky" in this context?

    My very uneducated guess is that it's because DRAM is more analog. CPU is just a bunch of transistors switching. DRAM is actually transistors and capacitors (that actually store the information). Charging up capacitors takes more time.
    Yes, dram does use capacitors as opposed to sram which is only transistors. I didn't take into account that the capacitors may have some fixed amount of time which they need to be able to charge up every time they drain...

    I don't understand why they still use capacitors. Are transistors really that much more expensive?
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  2. #32
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    My best guess would be that leaky means that it is "leaking" power, ie consuming power without doing much work, like a leak current through a transistor.
    I believe the biggest reason we use capacitors is because they take less space.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  3. #33
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    I believe the biggest reason we use capacitors is because they take less space.
    Are you sure about that? I am real ignorant of these things but I would have guessed a capacitor is a more physical voluminous thing than a transistor by nature.
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    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
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    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  4. #34
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    Not 100% sure, no, but I do believe it is the case.
    At least it is what I been led to believe in, as I've studied different types of memory.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    A capacitor, in essence, is just 2 conducting plates. If you put different voltages on the 2 plates, an electric field is formed between them, and that's where the energy is stored. A transistor is a bit more complex than that.

    I have no idea how things look on that scale, though.

  6. #36
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberfish View Post
    My very uneducated guess is that it's because DRAM is more analog. CPU is just a bunch of transistors switching. DRAM is actually transistors and capacitors (that actually store the information). Charging up capacitors takes more time.

    Static memory (flip-flops) used for CPU cache is a lot faster, but also a lot more expensive.
    The capacitors in microelectronics are on the order of femtofarads, charging them takes less time than it does to switch the transistor. No the big issue the way its accessed. Static RAM uses 6 transistors (6T) per memory cell, Dynamic Ram uses 1-3T. The read write cycles are slower because accessing the data is more complex with fewer transistors and memory is generally implemented with larger line sizes, not cutting edge 45nm stuff.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

  7. #37
    dra
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    Quote Originally Posted by Epy View Post
    Among the retardations that I'm hearing are gems like "XP is low-end, Vista is faster" (which has been proven to be false) and "Vista uses 1.5GB of RAM just from booting to the desktop" (yeah right).
    My Vista machine hovers at around 1.5GB after boot =/

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