Game Ideas

This is a discussion on Game Ideas within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; Hello, I'm looking for game programming ideas and was wondering if anyone here could help with that. I've just recently ...

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    14

    Game Ideas

    Hello, I'm looking for game programming ideas and was wondering if anyone here could help with that. I've just recently learned about functions and references, but I can't do anything with graphics yet. I'd like to take on a somewhat ambitious text based game. Any ideas will be appreciated.

    --MartinThatcher--

    P.S. Sorry if this is in the wrong section, I wasn't sure where it should go.

  2. #2
    Registered User jdragyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    92
    Zork was one of the first computer adventure games I ever played. This version (the download link is at the bottom) works on Windows XP and my virus scanner says it's clean (i.e. use at your own risk, though I've had no problems with it).

    It's a very simple game. I don't recommend it as game of the year or anything, but it might provide you some ideas.

  3. #3
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    segmentation fault
    Posts
    8,300
    Quote Originally Posted by MartinThatcher View Post
    a somewhat ambitious text based game.
    Zork will probably be fun (it was), so I'm not discouraging it, but I also think that will be less of a "learning programming" experience and more of a "abstract design" experience with a lot of the actual programming being repetitious.

    On the other hand, while the final product of a "hangman" type word game will be slightly less exciting, it may provide more and varied challanges, programming wise. The code base will be much smaller, so the number of new concepts and algorithms per unit of work (hours, lines) will be much greater.

    But I've never done either one, so that is just a guess. Basically, I suspect programming puzzle type games will teach you more than narrative type games, altho from a user's perspective narrative type games may be more interesting.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  4. #4
    Dr Dipshi++ mike_g's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    On me hyperplane
    Posts
    1,218
    Text based games are more complex than they seem, unless they are very crude. I'd recommend using a relational database like SQLite to store the data. EG: locations, actions, descriptive text. It does require learning to use a library though.

  5. #5
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    segmentation fault
    Posts
    8,300
    Quote Originally Posted by mike_g View Post
    Text based games are more complex than they seem, unless they are very crude. I'd recommend using a relational database like SQLite to store the data. EG: locations, actions, descriptive text. It does require learning to use a library though.
    I did not think they were simple! I just think a somewhat more "compact" project will teach you as much or more without becoming something too obsessive and time-consuming. On the other hand, dealing with a big code base (several thousand lines) is it's own sort of experience, and there's nothing wrong with obsession. The problem is if you are still rapidly learning, on a big project, half way thru you will want to start again, or else be tied to the methods you first committed to, which as you learn they will start to seem crude and limiting. Whereas if you do shorter projects, you can move on, and bring everything you learned to the next one, and they will naturally become larger and more complicated.

    SQLite is a good skill to have. But the OP might get more out of some clever classes/structs/functions and then plain text or xml files, which general parsing is a good skill to develop.
    Last edited by MK27; 10-06-2009 at 09:37 AM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  6. #6
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    7,404
    Quote Originally Posted by MartinThatcher View Post
    I've just recently learned about functions and references. [..] Any ideas will be appreciated.
    Here's one. Keep studying and forget about the goddamn games.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  7. #7
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,189
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    Here's one. Keep studying and forget about the goddamn games.
    <milk spit>
    Lol, yeah I sort of have to agree with that sentiment, but I also have to disagree. The idea of making games is what inspires many to take up programming in the first place. Te reality of the game industry is that you will be expected to work 12-16 hours a day 6 days a week, and longer when its 'crunch time', which is almost always due to the ingrained culture. After you finish your unpaid internship, which is usually at least 6 months, you may not even get a job, and if you do it will not be very high paid. There are simply too many people lining up to work for free for you to demand any kind of high salary unless you are in the top 1% of all programmers. Burnout in this industry is out of control. Most programmers don't last more than a few years.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

  8. #8
    ATH0 quzah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    14,826
    If it wasn't for having a game to fiddle with, I probably wouldn't have bothered. If you want something to motivate you, and you enjoy games, sure, make games to get through your lessons. It may be a lot more fun to make a word game to learn strings, than it is to make "Hello World", or what not. Take recursion for example. It's more interesting to make a maze solver, than it is to reverse a string. At least I find that more interesting.


    Quzah.
    Last edited by quzah; 10-06-2009 at 04:34 PM.
    Hope is the first step on the road to disappointment.

  9. #9
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    7,404
    The point is that with functions and references you are stuck to the 80s. There's three decades of programming to go over still.

    And when one needs that sort of motivation to learn a programming language, one should reevaluate their priorities. Sure, write small snippets of programs (which may as well include the notion of a game) to practice acquired knowledge. But the OBJECTIVE right now is to learn the programming language. The time for creating a game will come. There's no need to think of anything the size of game project.

    ...

    As for the games themselves, the odds of anyone getting in the industry in a position to make a difference (to their own lives) is probably more or less the same of a kid wanting to become a soccer player ending up on the premiere league. And sure as hell, those that do make it, didn't do it asking around what games they should develop.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  10. #10
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,189
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    The point is that with functions and references you are stuck to the 80s. There's three decades of programming to go over still.

    And when one needs that sort of motivation to learn a programming language, one should reevaluate their priorities. Sure, write small snippets of programs (which may as well include the notion of a game) to practice acquired knowledge. But the OBJECTIVE right now is to learn the programming language. The time for creating a game will come. There's no need to think of anything the size of game project.

    ...

    As for the games themselves, the odds of anyone getting in the industry in a position to make a difference (to their own lives) is probably more or less the same of a kid wanting to become a soccer player ending up on the premiere league. And sure as hell, those that do make it, didn't do it asking around what games they should develop.
    Well, I have always found it easier to acquire new skills in pursuit of a goal, rather than as the goal itself. e.g. I found it much easier to stay in shape when I was in the Army seeking to avoid a horrible and agonizing death in service to my country while helping the enemy die for theirs, than I do now, where I really have no use for bulging muscles and the ability to break concrete blocks with my fist...
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

  11. #11
    ATH0 quzah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    14,826
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    The point is that with functions and references you are stuck to the 80s. There's three decades of programming to go over still.
    How does that even make sense?
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    And when one needs that sort of motivation to learn a programming language, one should reevaluate their priorities.
    There is always a motivation for everything. Even if it's just to kill time.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    Sure, write small snippets of programs (which may as well include the notion of a game) to practice acquired knowledge. But the OBJECTIVE right now is to learn the programming language. The time for creating a game will come. There's no need to think of anything the size of game project.
    It's not a race.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    As for the games themselves, the odds of anyone getting in the industry in a position to make a difference (to their own lives) is probably more or less the same of a kid wanting to become a soccer player ending up on the premiere league. And sure as hell, those that do make it, didn't do it asking around what games they should develop.
    Apparently you've never heard of the word "fun". You should look into it.


    Quzah.
    Hope is the first step on the road to disappointment.

  12. #12
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    7,404
    It's like "Free". As meaningless as a full bag of nothing. Unless one gets rid of all the cheap talk and tries to give it some meaning. You know... meaningful fun?

    - "Oooh I want to have some fun with functions and references! Someone, quick give me something to do!"
    - "Sure, here's something. Fun is good. Fun is... yeah"

    ---

    But more seriously though, I do not critic the fact one may want to do a game after learning about functions and references in a multi-paradigm programming language more than I critic those who seem to encourage him to do just that.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  13. #13
    ATH0 quzah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    14,826
    Why? Encouraging someone to find a way to enjoy what they're doing is to be frowned upon? It's much better to read a boring ass tome... right?


    Quzah.
    Hope is the first step on the road to disappointment.

  14. #14
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    Here's one. Keep studying and forget about the goddamn games.
    Um, considering the fact that I'm in a game programming class, I won't be forgetting about programming games any time soon.

    As for the games themselves, the odds of anyone getting in the industry in a position to make a difference (to their own lives) is probably more or less the same of a kid wanting to become a soccer player ending up on the premiere league. And sure as hell, those that do make it, didn't do it asking around what games they should develop.
    All I was asking for was a few ideas since I'm having trouble coming up with ideas on my own. Please forgive me Mario F; I didn't realize that was against the law.

    With all of the negative comments I've gotten in this thread, it may as well not be open.

    Will any moderator who looks at this, please close it?

  15. #15
    Super Moderator VirtualAce's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    9,590
    Will any moderator who looks at this, please close it?
    Not sure why you want it closed but since you started it I will be more than happy to grant your request.
    Closed at the request of the OP.

Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. Sports simulation/game website ideas
    By ebemiss in forum Tech Board
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-22-2009, 11:23 AM
  2. beach bar (sims type game)
    By DrKillPatient in forum Game Programming
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-06-2006, 12:32 PM
  3. HELP!wanting to make full screen game windowed
    By rented in forum Game Programming
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-11-2004, 04:19 AM
  4. 2d game ideas
    By BeholderOf in forum Game Programming
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-27-2003, 05:06 PM
  5. Idea's for game
    By Unregistered in forum Game Programming
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 10-02-2001, 09:16 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21