not enjoying it

This is a discussion on not enjoying it within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; Does anybody recognize the phase that you dont enjoy programming anymore? Does it blow over? I see lots of regulars ...

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    not enjoying it

    Does anybody recognize the phase that you dont enjoy programming anymore? Does it blow over?
    I see lots of regulars on these boards who answer the same old questions over and over again. Dont you ever get tired of it? I used to enjoy coding so much, getting into the zone, learning lots while creating working stuff but now thats all gone and I dont know why.
    Do you recognize that?

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    Do you recognize that?
    Yes. I think it's a sign that you need to learn and try new things. Try learning a new language that has a REALLY different paradigm from your current one. If you've learnt C, try a dialect of Lisp, or OCaml or something. Or if you've only programmed console apps, try GUIs, or learn a language that makes the GUI super easy.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIBO View Post
    Do you recognize that?
    Very much so, yes. I too get bored of programming sometimes. I usually either do what Sean suggests and try to learn something new, or simply move on to other things in life.

    Personally I find that very healthy. It's how I learned to program in Erlang, which is today one of my languages of choice, how some years ago I discovered Celestia, how I meet new people, how I'm getting my tan, and I even suspect how my two daughters were born.

    More seriously though, getting bored of doing something you like is not a drama. It's in my opinion just you being normal. Without a catalyst that constantly keeps your interest in check, like actually programming for a living, it's rather acceptable that you may occasionally loose interest in your hobby. Only to sometime later return.

    Don't fight those moments of boredom. Choose something new or forget about it entirely. Your interest will not get burned and you will go back to it once the phase has passed.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Agreed with the posts before me. Sometimes all it takes is a new idea for a really good project. Sometimes it takes some time.
    That's saying something if I say it. I get bored very, very easily. I may have a great idea for a new project, start coding on it, only to arrive at the easy (but big) parts and stop only because it's too boring.

  5. #5
    and the hat of sweating
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    I wonder if it could also have something to do with the work environment?
    Were you happy programming when you were at a previous job and now it just doesn't feel the same as it used to?
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

    "the internet is a scary place to be thats why i dont use it much." - billet, 03/17/2010

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    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIBO View Post
    I see lots of regulars on these boards who answer the same old questions over and over again. Dont you ever get tired of it?
    I am sure there are plenty of people who have done this much more than me but I do do that. Of course, I didn't come to cboard as some kind of expert and I'm still not: I came to cboard as an absolute newbie (to C)* and I've probably learned more than I would have in a year of school, tho that is a gross generalization.

    I answer a lot more questions than I ask, but it's not total altruism: I am very conscious of the fact that my skills improve in the process. Sometimes I will even take time out to solve someone else's problem, because programming problem solving is an improvable skill. I'm not worried about giving the wrong answer, because I already know there is someone out there lurking who will point it out -- probably faster and more precisely than if the problem were my own, and I had asked the question Hence the learning. There's psychology for you, but it's all good, it's just about motivations. I probably wouldn't bother doing anything over and over again, unless I have some additional reason to do so. My answers to those same question got better

    Anyway, there's an activity to consider, KIBO. You may think helping others is a big waste of your own time in the sense that it is not truly "programming" but that may depend on your approach IMO, and if you like to think of the "big picture" contributing to on-line programming communities has got to be that . Also, I am of course working on my own things at the same time -- often I find that "hard core" activity easier and more interesting if every now and then I can take a sort of break by dealing with someone else's programming difficulties, which takes my mind away from my real task but not away from the computer or programming.

    Vis, languages that are totally different than C, I would go for a high level scripting language like perl, and or web programming which tends to involve a mixture of 2 or 3 languages (if you count html/css as one, then javascript, then something embedded/server-side like php) mixed together in strange ways. You can use perl or python in the place of php, which is very nice. I can't say enough good things about perl, I am constantly amazed by the extent of what has been done with it and what can be done with.

    Or else throw it in the closet, go to another continent, and learn another language

    *I actually was going to write this gushing post last month for my 1st anniversary saying how great I think cboard is and how I much I want to thank all the regulars** for making it what it is, etc, but I never bothered. Anyway, thanks.
    **except Elysia and Mario F. xP Just kidding.
    Last edited by MK27; 08-05-2009 at 08:49 PM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    This happened to me as well. There was a long period of time where I really had no desire to pick up a computer and start programming, except to complete a school project.

    Now that phase has gone out of me, and I enjoy programming again, but I think one of the reasons I got into that phase in the first place was because in the past I had done it too much, and there needs to be balance in life.

    If you find yourself tired of programming, go take a run. Meet a girl...or if you're a girl, go meet a guy. Go to a movie. Play some laser tag. Start gardening (gardens are great). Just go do other stuff. Then come back, and you will find yourself reinvigorated and ready to program again.
    My Website

    "Circular logic is good because it is."

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    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIBO View Post
    Does anybody recognize the phase that you dont enjoy programming anymore? Does it blow over?
    I see lots of regulars on these boards who answer the same old questions over and over again. Dont you ever get tired of it? I used to enjoy coding so much, getting into the zone, learning lots while creating working stuff but now thats all gone and I dont know why.
    Do you recognize that?
    Negative. I've been programming since I was 9, not once have I ever gotten tired of it. Now I have occasionally gotten tired of particular projects, sometimes that blows over, sometimes it doesn't. I don't really think of programming itself as the work, its merely a means to an end, you have to keep the goal in mind.
    Last edited by abachler; 08-06-2009 at 01:26 PM.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    thanks all. I think my main problems atm are that I need to discuss code too much with others from my boss which destroys all my creativity and that I havent created something working for too long. That means no satisfaction from work anymore

  10. #10
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    I had a similar problem with a former employer that filed to grasp the difference between manager and engineer. That he was quite frankly not qualified to make certain design decisions and that when I discussed t with him it was only too keep him informed, not to invite his 'opinion' which usually meant he expected it done that way.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    Having a SENIOR software engineer coworker who doesnt know what the boost library is and doesnt even know basic polymorphism doesnt help either!

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    Ugly C Lover audinue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIBO View Post
    Does anybody recognize the phase that you dont enjoy programming anymore? Does it blow over?
    I see lots of regulars on these boards who answer the same old questions over and over again. Dont you ever get tired of it? I used to enjoy coding so much, getting into the zone, learning lots while creating working stuff but now thats all gone and I dont know why.
    Do you recognize that?
    First think first, you'll need to "create" an interesting problems for you.

    For instance, play some games, and think:
    I can create a better, more enjoyable game than this one.

    Talk with your families, friends, boss, or whatever, and look for their needs which can be solved using computer. Sometime you'll gain some money here, but even you don't, you still get worthful experiences when solving their problems.

    Do some "features fusion".
    While there is 3 or more programs which work in the same subject(e.g. image proccessing, browser, data mining, etc) but have differencies in their features, create a program which combine their features that works with your style.
    Just GET it OFF out my mind!!

  13. #13
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KIBO View Post
    Having a SENIOR software engineer coworker who doesnt know what the boost library is and doesnt even know basic polymorphism doesnt help either!
    Well, not to be blunt, but Boost is over-rated. I personally don't use it because it -

    A. Brings nothing to the table.
    B. Involves learning a new library/api/interface/whatever you want to call it that brings nothing to the table.


    Now to clarify, I'm not saying it doesn't work. I'm saying that once you learn the Windows API you can do anything the boost library can do, only with less overhead and fewer problems. And since you have to learn WinAPI anyway, theres no point in also learning boost.

    As for polymorphism, it's an interesting feature, but honestly I rarely use it in the real world. Most of the applications I write are so special purpose that 99% of the code isn't reusable, so writing templates would be a waste of time.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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    only with less overhead and fewer problems
    And less portability.

  15. #15
    Malum in se abachler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyberfish View Post
    And less portability.
    yeah, and exactly how portable do you think a Windows Application needs to be? I mean as long as it ports to newer versions of windows that's all the portability it could want or need.
    Until you can build a working general purpose reprogrammable computer out of basic components from radio shack, you are not fit to call yourself a programmer in my presence. This is cwhizard, signing off.

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