It's a small world, after all.

This is a discussion on It's a small world, after all. within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; I love this video ....

  1. #1
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    It's a small world, after all.

    I love this video.
    Code:
    #include <cmath>
    #include <complex>
    bool euler_flip(bool value)
    {
        return std::pow
        (
            std::complex<float>(std::exp(1.0)), 
            std::complex<float>(0, 1) 
            * std::complex<float>(std::atan(1.0)
            *(1 << (value + 2)))
        ).real() < 0;
    }

  2. #2
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    The universe is out of this world.

    I regret having been born in this time and age in which we are still, and will probably be for a very long time, a backward sedentary civilization. Out there is where I would like us to be.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  3. #3
    and the hat of copycat stevesmithx's Avatar
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    Very Nice video. But I would like to see the video go and explore the other way around.
    From bigger to smaller(from light years to atomic).
    Whilst we know what constitutes an atom, i don't think we know what constitutes the constituents of an atom. At the end of that video they say that we are not at the center of the universe. Whilst it is highly probable that it could be true, i don't think something like that could be said for sure for an object whose boundaries are unknown.
    Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted
    - Albert Einstein.


    No programming language is perfect. There is not even a single best language; there are only languages well suited or perhaps poorly suited for particular purposes.
    - Herbert Mayer

  4. #4
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    >> But I would like to see the video go and explore the other way around.
    From bigger to smaller(from light years to atomic).

    That would be pretty cool (but extremely mind-boggling).

    >> Whilst it is highly probable that it could be true, i don't think something like that could be said for sure for an object whose boundaries are unknown.

    I would think that the universe is boundless. And even if it is a continuum, it still would have no center. Just as if you were standing somewhere on earth you could not say that you you were at the central point on the surface of the earth.
    Code:
    #include <cmath>
    #include <complex>
    bool euler_flip(bool value)
    {
        return std::pow
        (
            std::complex<float>(std::exp(1.0)), 
            std::complex<float>(0, 1) 
            * std::complex<float>(std::atan(1.0)
            *(1 << (value + 2)))
        ).real() < 0;
    }

  5. #5
    Webhead Spidey's Avatar
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    Ah, nice. But this one will always be my favorite - Powers Of 10
    It goes from small to big and then big to small.
    Spidey out!

  6. #6
    Registered User whiteflags's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevesmithx View Post
    Very Nice video. But I would like to see the video go and explore the other way around.
    Wish granted.

  7. #7
    Registered User valaris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whiteflags View Post
    Was just about to post this I can't recall the number of times I watched this thing through middle and high school.

  8. #8
    and the hat of copycat stevesmithx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whiteflags View Post
    Woot.
    Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted
    - Albert Einstein.


    No programming language is perfect. There is not even a single best language; there are only languages well suited or perhaps poorly suited for particular purposes.
    - Herbert Mayer

  9. #9
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    I have never before heard of Ångström. I have heard of Nano, however, so I fail to see why they wouldn't use nanometer and picometers instead of Ångström for small measurements...

    Quote Originally Posted by stevesmithx
    At the end of that video they say that we are not at the center of the universe. Whilst it is highly probable that it could be true, i don't think something like that could be said for sure for an object whose boundaries are unknown.
    Except the the universe is expanding, so if it were expanding different amounts on different sides, it would be impossible for us to be in the center.
    It is also worth pondering on Sebastiani's mention too.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  10. #10
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    I have never before heard of Ångström. I have heard of Nano, however, so I fail to see why they wouldn't use nanometer and picometers instead of Ångström for small measurements...
    Clearly you don't remember how the communists have tried to fool the American public with the metric system several times already -- I think that is part II of the video

    I'm pretty sure the universe does have a theoretical center, BTW, since space is a property (or effect) of mass and all mass in the universe began with a single event. The message is YOU are not that center. Hopefully. It should be easy to tell, because everything will be moving away faster than you can count.
    Last edited by MK27; 07-31-2009 at 12:31 PM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  11. #11
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    Clearly you don't remember how the communists have tried to fool the American public with the metric system several times already.
    No, never heard of that...
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  12. #12
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    One of the most thought provocative concepts of the expansion of the universe was the idea that relative speeds may lead to objects distancing themselves at speeds faster than the speed of light, making them invisible to each other.

    The idea was recently dismissed when it was found the universe expansion metric is always changing (from observations that seemed to prove the isotropic and homogeneous nature of universe expansion). But that thought nagged me for a very long time.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  13. #13
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    One of the most thought provocative concepts of the expansion of the universe was the idea that relative speeds may lead to objects distancing themselves at speeds faster than the speed of light, making them invisible to each other.
    You would not be able to see them then

    Isn't speed always relative? According to the general theory of relativity, the speed of light is always a constant relative to you, ie, no matter how fast you go, light will always seem to be going the same speed around you (just the wavelengths changes, so you get eg. redshift). I think that is the sense in which nothing can exceed the speed of light.

    So that means relative to say, Earth and Alpha Centauri, you could get an object travelling "faster" than the speed of light! I'm fcc'ing this off to NASA now...
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  14. #14
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    No. It would be slightly different. The objects could be moving at a speed slower than the speed of light. So any observer in the middle of them, for instance, could observe them. But their movement relative to each other could amount to a speed larger than the speed of light. Same as the relative speed of of a car moving in the opposite distance as mine, is the sum of our speeds.

    I always found this disturbing because the larger the distance, the more close to the speed of light these objects travel as demonstrated by their redshift. So it is easy to assume we would stop seeing any objects beyond a certain boundary. But if that was the case, the observable universe was not the whole universe. And that being the case, we could never even pretend to know the age of the universe, which could infinitely older than our current estimates, neither we could ever assume to understand the actual redshift. And to make things even more complicated, the existence of other objects beyond our current observation horizon wouldn't fit well into many current theories...

    This is more or less the problem Hubble himself faced when he later analyzed the results of his own findings. And what is amazing about this man was the he was indeed right. He helped set the pace of modern astronomy, and later questioned the validity of his own theories which proved him right again many years later. An extraordinary man.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  15. #15
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    No. It would be slightly different. The objects could be moving at a speed slower than the speed of light. So any observer in the middle of them, for instance, could observe them. But their movement relative to each other could amount to a speed larger than the speed of light.
    Okay, the NASA people have not gotten back to me yet *but* once the object in space, going 1 million mph, relative to it, the Earth is moving 1 million mph -- it is not moving at all, which is why light is still the same speed, not c - 1000000. So if the object kept accelerating indefinately (which acceleration is thrust, ie, displacing matter -- it works because you are, in effect, not moving, and you displace some matter, causing you to move. From a third perspective, you were moving to start with, so it is relative acceleration) eventually, from the perspective of Earth, it will appear to be moving close to the speed of light. From the object's perspective, the Earth is moving. I suspect beyond that point, you could not make any further observations, so while the object relative to Earth might be moving faster than light, you would not see it. And the object, relative to itself, would still not be moving, but will no longer see Earth.

    See? there are some loopholes in the contract. According to this, for example, "If a laser is swept across a distant object, the spot of light can easily be made to move at a speed greater than c."* Which seems paradoxical -- making a light beam move faster than light, but of course, the light in the beam did not have to change speed.

    *It's in chapter 3 and it was done with the moon; apparently a parallel "of this has been observed when an electromagnetic pulse from a lightning flash hits an upper layer of the atmosphere."
    Last edited by MK27; 07-31-2009 at 04:37 PM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

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