View Poll Results: Your most used C/C++ compiler?

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  • MS Visual Studio

    22 55.00%
  • Borland

    2 5.00%
  • GCC

    25 62.50%
  • Other paid (Please post)

    1 2.50%
  • Other free (Please post)

    3 7.50%
  • Other open-source (Please post)

    3 7.50%
Multiple Choice Poll.

Your most used compiler

This is a discussion on Your most used compiler within the General Discussions forums, part of the Community Boards category; What is your most used compiler when you work with C/C++:...

  1. #1
    * Death to Visual Basic * Devil Panther's Avatar
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    Your most used compiler

    What is your most used compiler when you work with C/C++:
    Last edited by Devil Panther; 07-15-2009 at 08:47 AM.
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  2. #2
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    I generally use gcc. From the command line (hate IDE's).
    Code:
    if( numeric_limits< byte >::digits != bits_per_byte )
        error( "program requires bits_per_byte-bit bytes" );
    24bbs.cpp

  3. #3
    DESTINY BEN10's Avatar
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    I prefer IDE's over command line, that's why I use MSVS. They are easy to handle in my opinion. But I'm sure I even dont know about 1% of all its function. Before MSVS, I was using borland.
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  4. #4
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    >> Before MSVS, I was using borland.

    I used Borland compilers for many years, and can honestly say they are my favorite to work with. Probably the "fastest" compiler ever built, too.
    Code:
    if( numeric_limits< byte >::digits != bits_per_byte )
        error( "program requires bits_per_byte-bit bytes" );
    24bbs.cpp

  5. #5
    &TH of undefined behavior Fordy's Avatar
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    Moved to General Discussions - a better home for polls.

    Oh, and MSVC++ 2005 or the most recent version of GCC depending on what I'm doing and on what platform

  6. #6
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastiani View Post
    I generally use gcc. From the command line (hate IDE's).
    Ditto. Except I will say "always" instead of "generally". After observing things around cboard, I have to say I have zero temptation to change this. Plus I'm a linux guy, of course, so maybe I don't have that much choice in the matter anyway. Which makes me doubly glad that gcc is gcc.

    I won't go off on IDE's beyond saying that while they may be great for professionals I think they are a very bad idea for beginners (again based on observations at cboard) who would be better off using the command line and a decent text editor. Which makes it a shame that some (non gcc) compilers don't give you that choice.
    Last edited by MK27; 07-15-2009 at 09:35 AM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  7. #7
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    I won't go off on IDE's beyond saying that while they may be great for professionals I think they are a very bad idea for beginners (again based on observations at cboard) who would be better off using the command line and a decent text editor. Which makes it a shame that some (non gcc) compilers don't give you that choice.
    I sincerely disagree, but of course, this is subjective.
    I would think beginners are more confused with command lines than with IDEs that does it all for them.

    Anyway, I'm an all-around Visual Studio user. I have occasionally used GCC with Code::Blocks, but that's about it.
    Btw, Visual Studio is not a compiler; it is an IDE. Visual C++ (and Visual C?) is the compiler(s).
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
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  8. #8
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    >> Visual C++ (and Visual C?) is the compiler(s).

    The actual compiler as invoked from the command line is cl (last time I used it anyway).
    Code:
    if( numeric_limits< byte >::digits != bits_per_byte )
        error( "program requires bits_per_byte-bit bytes" );
    24bbs.cpp

  9. #9
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    I would think beginners are more confused with command lines than with IDEs that does it all for them.
    Yes, but while being confused by an IDE is no real cause for tears, wanting to be a computer programmer who doesn't use the command line sounds almost oxymoronic. They should be comfortable with CLI *before* they start programming IMO. And I bet if they were, they would not seem to have so much trouble with the IDE.

    Ie, if you are a programmer, IMO the IDE is optional, but the command line is not. Sorry.

    I don't think the "beginners" to which I referred are command line wizards who have been baffled by a set of drop down menus and a mouse, if you see my subjective opinion More like they are victims of a specific, particular situation on a specific, particular operating system.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  10. #10
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastiani View Post
    >> Visual C++ (and Visual C?) is the compiler(s).

    The actual compiler as invoked from the command line is cl (last time I used it anyway).
    Yes, the executable name is cl.exe. But the compiler's actual name is Visual C++ or Visual C.

    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    Yes, but while being confused by an IDE is no real cause for tears, wanting to be a computer programmer who doesn't use the command line sounds almost oxymoronic. They should be comfortable with CLI *before* they start programming IMO. And I bet if they were, they would not seem to have so much trouble with the IDE.
    I don't know. That seems very subjective since you are a Linux user.
    I see no problem not knowing CLI if you're just developing normal Windows apps. Most of them do not deal with a lot of CLI stuff.

    Ie, if you are a programmer, IMO the IDE is optional, but the command line is not. Sorry.
    That also seems very subjective to me.
    I'd say the other way around.

    More like they are victims of a specific, particular situation on a specific, particular operating system.
    Specific problems? But then would it matter if they are CLI gurus or IDE gurus, or am I way off what you meant here?
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

  11. #11
    Guest Sebastiani's Avatar
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    >> Yes, the executable name is cl.exe. But the compiler's actual name is Visual C++ or Visual C.

    No, the name of the *package* is Visual C++. The name of the compiler is cl. Just ask the command prompt.
    Code:
    if( numeric_limits< byte >::digits != bits_per_byte )
        error( "program requires bits_per_byte-bit bytes" );
    24bbs.cpp

  12. #12
    spurious conceit MK27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    Specific problems? But then would it matter if they are CLI gurus or IDE gurus, or am I way off what you meant here?
    Yes, specific problems. You said it yourself:
    That seems very subjective since you are a Linux user.
    I see no problem not knowing CLI if you're just developing normal Windows apps. Most of them do not deal with a lot of CLI stuff.
    If that is *all* you are going to do, fair enough. But this disguises the fact that Windows is a specialized environment relative to any other sort of programming, eg embedded, for the web, or if you were to work on a cross platform compiler or language or a database engine or anything that is not just a windows desktop app. All of those things are now going to be problematic for you if you have grown up ignoring the command line and therefore the fundamental basics of what an operating system *really* is (not what a particular OS ended up like on the surface).

    The "subjectiveness" of linux use is not a parallel to this at all, since while it may not be as widespread on home PC's, it is much more closely related to unix (almost a unix clone) meaning it has a much greater "heritage" in computer science generally. I'm not bashing MS or claiming that ultimately linux is better, just that the MS OS is more of an exception, whereas *nix should be considered "the rule". Witness, this is not about linux users who can't use windows -- they can -- it is about windows users who can't use linux, presuming it is a minor sort of fad, as opposed to a limb of the real elephant, UNIX.

    One day in the future, programming may really become moving little icons around with your mouse. But we ain't there yet...

    No, the name of the *package* is Visual C++. The name of the compiler is cl. Just ask the command prompt.
    Package as in the pretty cardboard box? Cases and points I say!
    Last edited by MK27; 07-15-2009 at 10:55 AM.
    C programming resources:
    GNU C Function and Macro Index -- glibc reference manual
    The C Book -- nice online learner guide
    Current ISO draft standard
    CCAN -- new CPAN like open source library repository
    3 (different) GNU debugger tutorials: #1 -- #2 -- #3
    cpwiki -- our wiki on sourceforge

  13. #13
    and the hat of sweating
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    Yes, but while being confused by an IDE is no real cause for tears, wanting to be a computer programmer who doesn't use the command line sounds almost oxymoronic. They should be comfortable with CLI *before* they start programming IMO. And I bet if they were, they would not seem to have so much trouble with the IDE.

    Ie, if you are a programmer, IMO the IDE is optional, but the command line is not. Sorry.

    I don't think the "beginners" to which I referred are command line wizards who have been baffled by a set of drop down menus and a mouse, if you see my subjective opinion More like they are victims of a specific, particular situation on a specific, particular operating system.
    Learning everything at the same time is a formula for disaster.
    Learn the language first (at least well enough to get past all the real beginner mistakes); then you can teach them how to write Makefiles...
    But of course, I think before they even get into programming, they should take some OS courses including UNIX & Windows. Then they'll learn how to use the command line and how the OS works.
    "I am probably the laziest programmer on the planet, a fact with which anyone who has ever seen my code will agree." - esbo, 11/15/2008

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  14. #14
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    No. The compiler is called Microsoft C/C++ Optimizing Compiler
    Just run it on your command prompt.

    cl.exe is just an executable name. Could be rocksolid.exe and should still say the truth. Meanwhile Visual C++ is the generic name given to the C/C++ component of the Visual Studio, including the IDE, compiler, linker, and libraries.

    Anyways, I use visual C++ and MinGW on windows depending on what i'm doing, and gcc on Linux.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  15. #15
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MK27 View Post
    If that is *all* you are going to do, fair enough. But this disguises the fact that Windows is a specialized environment relative to any other sort of programming, eg embedded, for the web, or if you were to work on a cross platform compiler or language or a database engine or anything that is not just a windows desktop app.
    But in all seriousness, those are not exactly easy things to do. They require vast amounts of knowledge and things. Not exactly what the average programmer would touch or think about.
    Maybe except for the web, but then again, that might be a special area too... but then again, I don't think you need to know command-lines nevertheless, even for that. I have done PHP programming and I didn't need to know a lot of command-line stuff. Mostly just about variables.

    All of those things are now going to be problematic for you if you have grown up ignoring the command line and therefore the fundamental basics of what an operating system *really* is (not what a particular OS ended up like on the surface).
    In all seriousness, that comes from the eyes of a Linux user.
    What all operating systems have in common in the kernel.
    The layer on top, the GUI layer changes from each operating system.
    In Windows, it's all about UI, and in Linux, the focus is on command lines.
    I definitely would not call command lines basics for an OS.

    The "subjectiveness" of linux use is not a parallel to this at all, since while it may not be as widespread on home PC's, it is much more closely related to unix (almost a unix clone) meaning it has a much greater "heritage" in computer science generally. I'm not bashing MS or claiming that ultimately linux is better, just that the MS OS is more of an exception, whereas *nix should be considered "the rule".
    I can't agree with that either. Which OS came first or which kernel is used the most, or things like that, doesn't matter. It doesn't matter which OS has the biggest market share either.
    An OS is an OS. Linux is no different or better than Windows. Just because it has a greater "heritage" doesn't mean it's "the rule". Nor is Windows "the exception". They are two different OSes, that's all. Neither approach is more right, and that means learning about Unix-like environments is not a prerequisite for a programmer IMO.

    Witness, this is not about linux users who can't use windows -- they can -- it is about windows users who can't use linux, presuming it is a minor sort of fad, as opposed to a limb of the real elephant, UNIX.
    That's not fair. The main users of Linux aren't casual people, it's people who are into computers, geeks as some may call them. Of course they can use Windows, because just as with Linux, they know how computers work and have the desire to learn computers.
    Take a casual user, make him/her learn Linux. Can he/she use Windows later? I doubt it. Seriously.

    One day in the future, programming may really become moving little icons around with your mouse. But we ain't there yet...
    I would like to see that...
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

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