Engine <=> DX/OGL | c++ ?

This is a discussion on Engine <=> DX/OGL | c++ ? within the Game Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi, i am kind a new to this stuff and i wanted to know what en engine is, or rather ...

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    Engine <=> DX/OGL | c++ ?

    Hi,
    i am kind a new to this stuff and i wanted to know what en engine is,
    or rather how big game companies do the programming of their games.

    Well i know of Engines ... or at least i heard the name ...
    like the HalfLife2 Source Engine ...
    1) what is that ? is it some kind of collection of functions and classes ?
    2) how is an engine related to DirectX and OpenGL ?
    3) how much is using a certain Programming Language related
    to programm a game (for example , are they programming in c++ )
    4) Do i need an Engine to make a game ?

    well, i am kind of confused ... so if somebody could help me
    it would be great !

    thanks in advance

    Darkcloud
    Last edited by darkcloud; 05-12-2005 at 05:53 AM.

  2. #2
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    1) An engine in simple terms is the core of a game. If an engine is designed properly the engine can be reused to make other games.
    2) Engines/games are commonly written using the DirectX or OpenGL APIs.
    3) DirectX and OpenGL are commonly written in C/C++ but there are other languages that have bindings to them
    4) See number 1.

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    Thanks for the reply !
    but i still don't understand what an engine is ...

    could u explain that any better ?
    like what does it do ? how is it the CORE of the game ?

    thanks

    darkcloud

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    This is a quote from http://www.samspublishing.com/articl...p?p=29618&rl=1
    What Is a Game Engine?

    Think about a few different games you like, and try to think of them in terms of how they might be designed under the hood. More importantly, see if you can figure out any common design elements that would apply to all the games. For example, do all the games have a background, a title screen, and background music? If so, it's possible that they are designed around the concept of a game engine. Game engines are particularly useful in situations in which you plan on creating more than one game, and you don't want to have to reinvent the wheel each time around. The idea is that you figure out what common functionality all games use, and you write it once and stick it in the game engine.

    Another significant benefit of a game engine for Windows games is that it allows you to hide the messy details of Windows-specific code that doesn't necessarily have anything to do with a game. For example, most of the code you saw in the previous lesson has nothing to do with a game, but it's required of every Windows application. Rather than have you cut and paste this generic code to create a new game, I prefer hiding it in a game engine where you never have to fool with it again. You have an understanding of how it works, and you know it's there, but by not having to look at it you're free to focus on the more important and fun parts of your game code.

    In case you're wondering, there's nothing magical or mysterious about a game engine. A game engine represents an organization of the code for a game so that general application tasks are separated from game-specific tasks. The benefit to the game developer is that you can add features to a game engine that you will be able to reuse in all of your future games. Additionally, using a game engine allows you to simplify the code for your games and focus your attention on the game code that matters most. Once you get accustomed to using a game engine, you'll wonder how games could be created any other way. In reality, most commercial game developers do have their own custom game engines that they've developed over years of learning what common features most games require.

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    cool, thanks that really did help a lot ...

    so graphik stuff is also engine specific ... at least some
    part of it ... depending on the game

    for exapmple some shading process in a game i just saw somewahere where leafs are rendered with about two or three textrure layers or something ?
    actually if i understand that right it's just some collection of prcedures ..
    or functions/classes
    right ?

    thanks

    darkcloud

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    >>it's just some collection of prcedures ..
    or functions/classes
    right ?

    Close enough

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    lol that doesn't sound very encourage ... but i guess i'll stick
    with it ... thanks for putting up with me !

    darkcloud

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