3d Games Programming.

This is a discussion on 3d Games Programming. within the Game Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; I haven't programmed in DirectX or OpenGL, I'm currently holding position at stage 2: Win32 API You have a long ...

  1. #16
    UNBANNED OneStiffRod's Avatar
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    I haven't programmed in DirectX or OpenGL, I'm currently holding position at stage 2: Win32 API

    You have a long road ahead of you my friend.... ask any question you like but only in english cheif.
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  2. #17
    Rambling Man
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    Hey what do you know, this article is useful in more than one thread in one night.

  3. #18
    ~- Y u n a -~ beely's Avatar
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    Originally posted by OneStiffRod
    I haven't programmed in DirectX or OpenGL, I'm currently holding position at stage 2: Win32 API

    You have a long road ahead of you my friend.... ask any question you like but only in english cheif.
    but anyway, i don't know which point should i start actually?

    even the C that i have learned everything on the book. but there's still a lot of hidden code that haven't learn yet (such as : <conioh>, ... and etc) duh ... i guess it will take alot of time learn C / C++ .

  4. #19
    ~- Y u n a -~ beely's Avatar
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    Originally posted by TechWins
    Hey what do you know, this article is useful in more than one thread in one night.
    hey, where you got that article. what a realise is it! that's great article for begineer of the games programmer.

  5. #20
    Rambling Man
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    i guess it will take alot of time learn C / C++
    You don't have to learn "all" of C/C++ to be able to create a program worthwhile or for that matter you don't even have to know a lot of C/C++ to create a program worthwhile. It's really a matter of setting your goals to a certain level and trying to achieve them. As you achieve each goal set your bar higher for the next goal. Take small baby steps while not being afraid of taking on a challenge. This is explained very well in the article by Geoff Howland, which is why I really like that article. I think every beginner to game programming or even just programming should read the article. Not only does it explain the path you should take, but IMO, it, also, motivates you to try to get to that point of achievement. Always remember that creating even the lamest of programs is still helping you learn, so don't be ashamed of anything you create so as long as you tried your best on it and you learned. Good luck.

    One more thing, though. In the long run it would probably greatly benefit you if you tried to brush up on your English a bit. This is not meant to be offending in any manner at all; I think you would be able to learn a lot easier and get helped a lot more if you could speak English more fluently. Just a thought.

  6. #21
    Banned master5001's Avatar
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    My first 3d engine was a dos based engine that had no hardware acceleration. This is actually not a bad place to start for one reason, I had to write my own rotation algorthims, my own texture mapping algorithms, and my own polygon manager. From doing that I was able to learn many of the mathematical techniques available for creating the illusion of 3d on a pc. But if you most like to skip the more theoretical sides to what they are programming and api's such as d3d and ogl speed development along.

    I think you should start off like everyone else before jumping into 3d programming. Make some c or c++ console apps, then get into using some easy to use graphics api (allegro or sdl would do just fine). If you don't know which language to learn first I'll give you the bottom line. C usually takes less time to learn. C++ can be a bit confusing at first but c++ is better for rapid development.

  7. #22
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    Originally posted by master5001
    My first 3d engine was a dos based engine that had no hardware acceleration. This is actually not a bad place to start for one reason, I had to write my own rotation algorthims, my own texture mapping algorithms, and my own polygon manager. From doing that I was able to learn many of the mathematical techniques available for creating the illusion of 3d on a pc. But if you most like to skip the more theoretical sides to what they are programming and api's such as d3d and ogl speed development along.

    I think you should start off like everyone else before jumping into 3d programming. Make some c or c++ console apps, then get into using some easy to use graphics api (allegro or sdl would do just fine). If you don't know which language to learn first I'll give you the bottom line. C usually takes less time to learn. C++ can be a bit confusing at first but c++ is better for rapid development.
    I couldn't agree more. While I am programming 3D games now, I had to work my way up just like everyone else. Get a SOLID foundation on the language ( C/C++ ) and then introduce Win32 API. Once you feel confident with that API try making a simple 2D game with it. After that you may want to learn DirectX. I always suggest porting your Win32 game over to DirectDraw ( 2D portion of DirectX ).

    An important thing master5001 said is that you really need to learn the actual 3D math that goes on in 3d algorithms. I mean, sure you can call some functions and have it do the work for you but I strongly suggest actually learning what is going on behind the scenes! I wrote a 3D api just using GDI. I had to write my own vector library , matrix library etc. I learend so much about the graphics pipeline from doing this and I'm still adding to it for fun. Anyways this is just my opinion , take it or leave it.

    On a side note, master5001 I see you have GBA programmer under your name, cool! Are you working for a company making a GBA title or are you doing it for recreation? I'm starting work on my GBC project January.

  8. #23
    ~- Y u n a -~ beely's Avatar
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    seen that i have a lot of times to learn making 3d games? sigh .

  9. #24
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    Because I am seeing this kind of posts regularly, especially in this forum, I will try to enlighten you up.

    First of all, you will need a strong knowledge of the language you want to use. As I am a game developer myself, I suggest C with a little C++ (classes only, inheritance could add an overhead). You should have a solid knowledge of the language and a good understaning of math to make a decent 3D Game Engine.

    Now, the Graphics API. I dont want to start a flame war in here, between the two major APIs Direct3D and OpenGL. Do not confuse DirectX with Direct3D, the second one is part of the first. I personally like and I am mastering OpenGL, I suggest you go for that if you are a begginer to learn the basics and then choose whichever you want. The best thing is to try both though.
    Once you have learnt the basics of the API, you can move on to bigger things. But remember! One step at a time or you will do nothing.

    As for the 3D Animation, I don't think you are an animator as you are in these forums, but I have several programs to suggest. If your budget affords it, definatelly go for Discreet 3DSMax 5. There are other solutions, such as Lightwave and Milkshape3d, btw, Milkshape is freeware and it is very nice, I use it sometimes to make my test static models.

    Here are some links that will help you get started:
    http://www.flipcode.com
    http://www.gamedev.net
    http://www.gamasutra.com

    And these are C/C++/OpenGL specific
    http://www.gametutorials.com
    http://nehe.gamedev.net <-with ports to other languages.

    I hope this helped you.
    Good luck and happy programming!
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  10. #25
    ~- Y u n a -~ beely's Avatar
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    yoo... that's greats. thank for help ..

  11. #26
    ~- Y u n a -~ beely's Avatar
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    do you think that 3d shooting games , such as counter-strike should be made in team programmer? so, what do you think about graphic? should i need to learn graphic design to design the animation and graphic, although i have learned all of the games programming language for future?

  12. #27
    Rambling Man
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    beely, all you need to worry about is learning c/c++ and an API of your choice. The companies who made counter-strike and half-life had over million dollar budgets with 10-30 people working on the games with each person probably having at least 3-4 years of experience. Basically you don't have to make a counter-strike or half-life game to make a good game when being an amatuer. Just try to do your best, that's all. Don't worry about what the game industry is making; worry about what you're making. To find out what you should be making read that link I gave you up above.

  13. #28
    ~- Y u n a -~ beely's Avatar
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    ermm..... ok ok thank ya!

  14. #29
    UNBANNED OneStiffRod's Avatar
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    Beely, I think you should learn how to make 3D objects using the 3D Modeller I pointed you to...

    www.aliaswavefront.com

    Obviously, all 3D games use 3D models and they are animated using the 3D modeller programs. If you go this 3D route for now you'll learn all the important concepts and how to create objects and characters and especially 3D worlds. Once you have you're 3D characters and stuff you can learn how to create a world for them to play in, that's where C++ comes in.
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  15. #30
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    I don't think that Beely should concentrate on two things, programming AND 3d modelling. I suggest Beely to learn programming and use ready models to test his work. However, if you want, Belly, to do some low poly modelling too, Milkshape3d is a good modelling suite.
    Cya!
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