Hi! I'm new

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    Hi! I'm new

    Hi i am new to programming and i have taken a very liking to it.. andi see there are some jobs out there that i can be so i was wondering...

    If i wanna be a game developer, what should i learn first...Like i wanna be the guys who make the characters walk and basically the gameplay. any idea where i should start?




    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    Well first you need a firm grasp of the basics. You need to learn about variables, data types, arrays, pointers and memory, loops, selection statements and file io. And more importantly, OOP. If you want to develop anything like a character walking across the screen you need all the basics and a truck load more too, including direct x.

    Its sounds like a lot, but every proffessional had to start right at the bottom and work upwards. Get a good book, practice hard, and when you are ready, make a simple text advenure to begin with. Doesnt look flashy but it used many of the most basic programming principles. Start from that and slowly work up.
    I'm just trying to be a better person - My Name Is Earl

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    allright thanks i will look at books that are recommended and learn. i have Microsoft visual C++ 2008 express edition

    so what i get from the book i will try it in this compiler? like a test to see if i'm doing it right?


    Also what languages would be smart for me to learn if i wanna be a game dev.

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    C++ is the language for games. Perhaps C, as well, though I think C++ is more common.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    C++ is the language for games. Perhaps C, as well, though I think C++ is more common.

    Is there any books you would recommend? or sites that are very detailed?

    (becuase you seem to know alot about Programming).

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Games are not particularly my area, but... for books about programming, check out the recommended books thread. It should be enough to get you started.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

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    C++ is only the 10% or may be even less part of the whole game development process!
    just start out. you have a loooooooooooong () way to cover! good luck!
    Last edited by manav; 03-24-2008 at 10:37 PM. Reason: To suit DavidP's wordings!

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    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    C++ is only the 10% or may be even less part of the whole game programming process!
    I disagree. If you had said game development process I would have agreed, but since you said game programming process I disagree. While it is true other languages might be used in game programming, C++ is by far the most prevalent in that field, and so I would give it much more than 10%.


    Anyways, back on topic....

    You have already started out well by getting MS VC++ express edition. It is a good environment to develop in.

    I pretty much echo what everyone else in here has said: find a good book and start learning!
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    allright thanks for all the info guys, I will find a book that is recommended at the recommended books area(lol).


    The book i am going to get is like Accelerated C++.

    What i was wondering though is am i gonig to have to rember it? or can i use that and test it out in my MS VC++? (i will take notes in a notebook anways for important stuff).

  10. #10
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    You will never learn if you don't try. Experience is your guide.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

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    It really all goes back to that old saying. "Practice makes perfect". Although perfect is a very strong word in programming.

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    Quote Originally Posted by swgh View Post
    including direct x.
    ...or OpenGL.

    FlyingIsFun1217

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    i dont know Vicious's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FlyingIsFun1217 View Post
    ...or OpenGL.

    FlyingIsFun1217
    Yes! Maybe you'll become a 1337z0r OpenGL programer and make the industry start making more OpenGL games so we can start playing something on linux other than Unreal Tournament!

    To the OP: Don't be afraid to try stuff. Books are good references, but also remember there's a whole internet full of resources. This message board also has a ton of info that will help you. The FAQ section on this forum alone could almost be a book itself!
    Last edited by Vicious; 03-26-2008 at 02:16 PM.
    What is C++?

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    Super Moderator VirtualAce's Avatar
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    Don't be afraid to try stuff. Books are good references, but also remember there's a whole internet full of resources.
    Although it does depend on the author I've found that books are normally far more correct than the internet. Half and I do mean half of the code on the internet for D3D or OpenGL is either incomplete (leaves out important details), doesn't work, or is just plain wrong in all aspects.

    Do NOT use the internet as your sole source for game code. Books are plentiful and for the most part they are very good, very accurate (and if not they have published errata and corrections), and at amazon they come at a very good price.

    Internet tutorials are some of the most dangerous code you will ever come across. They go so fast in an attempt to fly through the material that they often leave out the most important detail and/or gotchas that can quite simply make or break your project. In the end no one is going to write a tutorial or book about how to make your game.
    It takes a lot of research (books and internet - but again be careful of the sites you trust), patience, hard work, and quite honestly talent.

    One site you can almost always be sure has done their homework is www.gamasutra.com. They have excellent articles from the pro's who know and links to resources that are a godsend. Gamedev has been recommended but be careful as many of their articles and tutorials are sorely out of date.

    Also unless you are shooting for cross-platform graphics I would go with Direct3D on Windows platforms. Under the hood OpenGL uses Direct3D because Direct3D is the only way to access the graphics hardware in Windows. I just found this information out recently and was taken aback by it. It should be noted that it is just my opinion you should use Direct3D. Inevitably the decision is yours on what API to use. Most, if not all, are quite similar in principle.
    Last edited by VirtualAce; 03-26-2008 at 08:24 PM.

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    *clap* *clap* amazing....

    Thank you for that very thorough post. and i can confirm that some sites really teach you bad stuff (it taught me stsyem. pause() or whatever) and luckliy this guy i talked to fixed up my whole project and i never went back to that site....


    Also i would like to know how would you make images so you can see it in when you debugg it (like how do games do it. lol)

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