argh! (and argv and argc too!!)

This is a discussion on argh! (and argv and argc too!!) within the C# Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; So I am trying to learn C#...and I have the language specifications with me, so that is no problem. I ...

  1. #1
    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    argh! (and argv and argc too!!)

    So I am trying to learn C#...and I have the language specifications with me, so that is no problem.

    I got the syntax and all that kind of stuff down easy.

    The problem is the libraries. Where are they? Where are the standard libraries?!?!?

    There is no "C# Doc" anywhere like there is a JavaDoc that outlines all the libraries for Java.

    I see people using ArrayList when they include System.Collections in their code, but how do they know that ArrayList exists?

    I don't see any documentation anywhere to what classes exist or what the standard library has! Where is the math library? Where is everything?

    If ArrayList exists, I assume Stack, Queue, Tree, HashSet, and many others exist, just as they do in Java and the C++ STL library, but where??

    I don't see any documentation anywhere telling me where everything is located and what there is available to use.

    And is there a C# graphics library? What's the deal?

    The language specification is great, but the C# library documentation is NON-EXISTENT. I need to know what libraries I have at my disposal before I can make anything. I don't want to have to re-invent the wheel.
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  2. #2
    the hat of redundancy hat nvoigt's Avatar
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    Basically, there is a class for everything. And I mean everything.

    Your best bet is to read alot of examples or a book or two. "C# Essentials" from O'Reilly is a nice overview and shouldn't be too costly ( 20$ when it was brand new in 2001 ).

    The Math library is called System.Math

    Stack, Queue and Hashtable are in System.Collections.

    The graphics library is System.Drawing i.e. GDI+

    If you know what you are looking for, use the MSDN help or Google. From what I have used so far, C# seems to be more consistent in rules and naming than any other Language. If you need a stack, you can be sure it will be named Stack and not be hidden in some obscure class library as s_TacK.

    Most of the time C# is so insanely simple that you get embarrassed every time you ask a question:

    Me: Does anyone know how to encode a text to ascii in C# ?
    Colleague: How about using System.Text.Encoding with System.Text.Encoding.Ascii ?
    Me: Doh!

    Once you get used to the rules of their librabry naming, it's just a matter of trial and error and once you get used to the helpfile, it should be about 1 try only
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  3. #3
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    In the MSDN library section, at the tree menu on the left:

    - .NET development
    - .NET Framework SDK
    - .NET Framework
    - Reference
    - Class Library

    Since C# was made for .NET Applications that pretty much IS it's standard library. Just to echo what nvoigt said, C# is very intuitive, especially if you're coming from a Java and or C++ background (particularly Java in my opinion).

    edit: From a C++ background, Windows programming is WAY easier. I love it.

  4. #4
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    Haha, use the help! Wow, just press F1 or goto the help menu. There is also the start menu icon: Microsoft Visual Studio .NET Documentation 2003 and some of you may have the MSDN Library for Visual Studio .NET 2003. You can always check msdn.microsoft.com.

    And you can document your functions like in Java. Get a book to read more about it cause its pretty complex, but for rough stab at it, go in front of a function (line before maybe) and type /// (three slashes. Then see what comes up if you're using VS as your IDE.

  5. #5
    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    In the MSDN library section, at the tree menu on the left:

    - .NET development
    - .NET Framework SDK
    - .NET Framework
    - Reference
    - Class Library
    I have scoured MSDN for a couple days and cant find that at all. Here is what I find:

    .NET Development
    - Windows Forms
    - Visual Studio .NET
    - .NET Framework SDK
    - .NET Framework Deployment
    - ....and so on and so forth....

    Networking and Directory Services
    - and everything in its subdir
    and so on and so forth....

    and none of them have a class library anywhere to be seen.


    and MSVS .NET Help files are the exact same way. No class library anywhere to be seen.
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  6. #6
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    The spacing in that post didn't come out like I wanted and I didn't notice. You are aware that each bullet is a branch off of the bullet above it?

  7. #7
    Even death may die... Dante Shamest's Avatar
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    >> I have scoured MSDN for a couple days and cant find that at all.

    I found it in 6 seconds.

    Code:
    - .NET Development
       - .NET Framework SDK
         - .NET Framework
            - Reference
              - Class Library

  8. #8
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    I only found that because of a link in a previous thread in the GD forum. I must agree with David that that was a really counter-intuitive classification for it. Under the SDK?

  9. #9
    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    they just shouldnt make it so deep in the directory structure. it makes it hard to find.

    the class library is one bound to be one of the most commonly used things, and being that deep in the directory structure just isnt right. it should be higher up.
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  10. #10
    Even death may die... Dante Shamest's Avatar
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    Use the Search feature then.

    I typed ".NET class library" and got it as the 2nd result.

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