private/public get/set

This is a discussion on private/public get/set within the C# Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hello everyone, New to C#, a simple question which my book does not cover. If we do not specify the ...

  1. #1
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    private/public get/set

    Hello everyone,


    New to C#, a simple question which my book does not cover.

    If we do not specify the public/private access of get/set, then it is of the same as the public/private access to the property itself, but we can overwrite it.

    For example, in the following code, in get method, when we do not specify public/private, it will be automatically the same as the property Abc, which makes get public, but in set, we can overwrite it to make it private?

    Code:
    public class MyList
    {
    
        class Foo
        {
            private int _abc;
    
            public int Abc
            {
                get
                {
                    return _abc;
                }
                private set
                {
                    _abc = value;
                }
            }
    
        }
    
        static void Main()
        {
            Foo f = new Foo();
            return;
        }
    }

    thanks in advance,
    George

  2. #2
    CSharpener vart's Avatar
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    Rishon LeZion, Israel
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    we can overwrite it to make it private?
    yes we can
    The first 90% of a project takes 90% of the time,
    the last 10% takes the other 90% of the time.

  3. #3
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    Thanks vart,


    Quote Originally Posted by vart View Post
    yes we can
    I have written some samples and here are the learning results. Could you review whether I am correct. :-)

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/75e8y5dd.aspx

    1.

    "You cannot use accessor modifiers on an interface or an explicit interface member implementation."

    Means we can not put modifier on interface declaration of accessor, and also can not use modifier on the class implementation of the accessor (which is declared in interface).

    2.

    "When you use an accessor to implement an interface, the accessor may not have an access modifier. However, if you implement the interface using one accessor, such as get, the other accessor can have an access modifier, as in the following example:"

    It means if interface only declare one accessor, either get/set, then in the class implementation, for the interface declared accessor, either get/set, we can not use any modifier, but for the other accessor, which is not declared in interface, either set/get, we can add modifier.

    Both understandings are correct?


    regards,
    George

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