divide by zero

This is a discussion on divide by zero within the C# Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; "Make" is a program that understands which components need to be rebuilt when another component is changed. "linker" is the ...

  1. #16
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    "Make" is a program that understands which components need to be rebuilt when another component is changed. "linker" is the application that puts together an executable file.

    What this means is that the .Net assembly corresponds to both the input of the Make utility (i.e. "Makefile") and Linker (usually on the command line).

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  2. #17
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    The .Net .exe & .dll files are called assemblies that have, in general, three sets of data. There is an assembly manifest, type meta-data (also known as CIL), and a resource file (.rsp) with build/make instructions in it.

    The .exe & .dll files in .Net have no relation to their binary executable types like we are accustomed to with binary installers and the like.

    When you publish a C# application or .dll all you are really publishing is a shopping list for the .Net Framework to fill via mscoree.dll. mscoree.dll takes your .exe file like a book and reads its manifest, .rsp, and meta-data and prepares it for the JIT (Jitter) in the .Net Framework. The Jitter then accesses the .Net Base Classes library and assembles your application in byte code on the fly. This is the same way Python is handled with Idle the python interpreter.

    You don't actually see your C# application until it is built and compiled on the fly by Jitter each time you run your C# app.

    Very much like bake and make with a touch of interpreter I think.

    You can actually alter how your C# app will be built by editing the .rsp resource file. .rsp is every bit the make file I say it is and it's pretty tight. You should look into it cause I'm sure you will agree. If your familiar with C++ this will be a trip down memory lane for you.

    My reference into this subject was the book Pro C#2008 and the .Net 3.5 Platform published by Apress and authored by Andrew Troelsen. This guy knows his stuff. Got mine at Barnes & Noble before I saw it cheaper on Amazon.

    Thank you Matsp.
    I just learned some more...real familiar with C++ aren't ya'!
    Excellent.
    Last edited by TheRaven; 05-01-2008 at 06:09 PM.

  3. #18
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    Thanks Mats,


    Make accepts source filess as input, but .Net assembly is binary file, how do you think it is similar to what is input to make in C++?

    Quote Originally Posted by matsp View Post
    What this means is that the .Net assembly corresponds to both the input of the Make utility (i.e. "Makefile") and Linker (usually on the command line).

    --
    Mats

    Great TheRaven!


    Two more comments,

    1.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheRaven View Post
    The .exe & .dll files in .Net have no relation to their binary executable types like we are accustomed to with binary installers and the like.
    What does your above statements mean? I am confused. Could you say any other words, especially "no relation to their binary executable types" and "accustomed to with binary installers and the like"?

    2.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheRaven View Post
    When you publish a C# application or .dll all you are really publishing is a shopping list for the .Net Framework to fill via mscoree.dll. mscoree.dll takes your .exe file like a book and reads its manifest, .rsp, and meta-data and prepares it for the JIT (Jitter) in the .Net Framework. The Jitter then accesses the .Net Base Classes library and assembles your application in byte code on the fly. This is the same way Python is handled with Idle the python interpreter.
    Byte code you mean native code other than IL code, right?

    3.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheRaven View Post
    You can actually alter how your C# app will be built by editing the .rsp resource file. .rsp is every bit the make file I say it is and it's pretty tight. You should look into it cause I'm sure you will agree. If your familiar with C++ this will be a trip down memory lane for you.

    My reference into this subject was the book Pro C#2008 and the .Net 3.5 Platform published by Apress and authored by Andrew Troelsen. This guy knows his stuff. Got mine at Barnes & Noble before I saw it cheaper on Amazon.

    Thank you Matsp.
    I just learned some more...real familiar with C++ aren't ya'!
    Excellent.
    Any referred materials (free online) :-) for .rsp file?


    regards,
    George

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