construction order

This is a discussion on construction order within the C# Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hello everyone, For the following code, it is correct to say that, 1. obj1 will be instialized when .NET Runtime ...

  1. #1
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    construction order

    Hello everyone,


    For the following code, it is correct to say that,

    1. obj1 will be instialized when .NET Runtime loads class Foo and before any instance is created?

    2. obj2 will be created each time we create an instance of Foo, and obj2 will be called before constructor?

    My question is whether my understanding (1) and (2) are correct?

    Code:
    class Foo
    {
        static private object obj1 = new object();
        private object obj2 = new object();
        public Foo()
        {
        }
    }

    thanks in advance,
    George

  2. #2
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    I know (2) is incorrect. There is no order. It's just a list of items in the class in no particular order other than which you typed first. It's correct that obj2 will be created each time you create an instance of Foo().

    And correct me if i'm wrong, but for the static obj1 to work, the class must be static, otherwise it'll just act like obj2.
    He who asks is a fool for five minutes, but he who does not ask remains a fool forever.

    The fool wonders, the wise man asks. - Benjamin Disraeli

    There are no foolish questions and no man becomes a fool until he has stopped asking questions. Charles Steinmetz

  3. #3
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    Thanks DanFraser,


    Your answer is clear.

    Quote Originally Posted by DanFraser View Post
    I know (2) is incorrect. There is no order. It's just a list of items in the class in no particular order other than which you typed first. It's correct that obj2 will be created each time you create an instance of Foo().

    And correct me if i'm wrong, but for the static obj1 to work, the class must be static, otherwise it'll just act like obj2.

    regards,
    George

  4. #4
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    Wink

    You could also use conditionals like if - else and switch cases in the Foo method to control the instantiation of objects as well. In C# an object can be created from within a method albeit it should be derived from a virtual or abstract type.

    Something fun to think about...

  5. #5
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    Thanks TheRaven,


    I am interested in "albeit it should be derived from a virtual or abstract type". Could you show some pseudo code please or more description (so that I can write some code)?

    Quote Originally Posted by TheRaven View Post
    You could also use conditionals like if - else and switch cases in the Foo method to control the instantiation of objects as well. In C# an object can be created from within a method albeit it should be derived from a virtual or abstract type.

    Something fun to think about...

    regards,
    George

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