Int and Character in the same variable

This is a discussion on Int and Character in the same variable within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Im pretty new to C++ and was wondering, how can you store both a integer and a character in the ...

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    Int and Character in the same variable

    Im pretty new to C++ and was wondering, how can you store both a integer and a character in the same variable. I was wondering this because I am making a program which could store all my passwords and such but I dont know, if there is, a variable to store both. If not any one have any advice how to store a password in I guess an array that contains both characters and integers.

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    There is no such thing. However, you can store it as a string and, if it turn out later that it is indeed a number, you can convert the string to number.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    I dont know much about strings. What exactly are they? They store like words right?

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    Code:
    std::string mystr = "My string";
    std::string mystr2 = "123";
    That should give you an idea of what a string is.
    It basically holds text or characters.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    But not both. Im sorry for asking so many questions but how would you convert it and how does that allow both characters and integers?

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    An array of int can be used to stored ascii characters. The extraction method has however to be coded.

    As a simple example you can do this:

    Code:
    char foo = 'a';
    int bar = foo;
    char baz = bar;
    
    std::cout << baz; // prints 'a'
    You can thus create an array of ints and code the extraction of those elements you need to use as characters.

    Meanwhile char is a integral numeric type. This means 'a' is actually stored as an integer. char size is described to be 8bits minimum. This means you can store numbers on it.

    signed char -128 to +127 (off the top of my head)
    unsigned char: 0 - 256
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    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    So you kind of route the char foo which is = to a through a int so its a char variable in a int variable then route i back through another char variable so then how do you add int into.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    I'm sorry, you need a few commas or periods in there. I can't make what you are saying.

    But I planned just to show you how characters are actually stored. You can even cout << bar. That will still print 'a' because that, in short, how cout operates. It does an implicit conversion.

    The idea is then to show you you can make an array of char and store integers in it, or an array of int and store characters in it.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Sorry for the Grammar. Is there any ways to store them together or for like a password would you have to have:
    Code:
    int first_number = 1;
    char first_letter = a;
    int second_number = 2;
    char second_letter = b;
    
    cout<< first_number << first_letter << second_number << second_letter<<;

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    Algorithm Dissector iMalc's Avatar
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    A string stores text. Numbers are part of text. This is fine:
    Code:
    std::string: alphanum = "1a2b";
    std::cout << alphanum << std::endl;
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    Thank you very much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by A13W
    But not both. Im sorry for asking so many questions but how would you convert it and how does that allow both characters and integers?
    You need to understand this basic concept very well!

    string a = "6358";
    int b = "6358";


    a and b are two far different type of data:

    The string contains 4 "sub-variables": one for "6", one for "3", etc.

    The int contains the real value of "6358" instead.

    Maybe this link explains it better:
    http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/variables.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by carlorfeo View Post
    You need to understand this basic concept very well!

    string a = "6358";
    int b = "6358";


    a and b are two far different type of data:

    The string contains 4 "sub-variables": one for "6", one for "3", etc.

    The int contains the real value of "6358" instead.

    Maybe this link explains it better:
    http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/variables.html
    You are confusing the issue. The second line of that code is not what you intended.

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    Quote Originally Posted by carlorfeo View Post
    string a = "6358";
    int b = "6358";

    [/url]
    You mean:
    Code:
    int b = 6358;

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