Downloaded VC++ Express from msdn

This is a discussion on Downloaded VC++ Express from msdn within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hey everyone.. I just started to learn C++ and I just downloaded VC++ Express Edition last night. The setting was ...

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Jacksonville, AR
    Posts
    91

    Smile Downloaded VC++ Express from msdn

    Hey everyone..

    I just started to learn C++ and I just downloaded VC++ Express Edition last night. The setting was using the stdafx.h and I was just wondering how to do it otherwise. I am not yet familiar with the libraries out there and maybe somebody can help me on how to set it right. I was working on a project in a 32-bit mode, I think, and I honestly don't really know what that means.

    Would I be needing SDK for more complicated programs like computations?

    Thanks..

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Jacksonville, AR
    Posts
    91

    Smile

    Oh and btw, is it recommended to download the service pack updates as well?

  3. #3
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The edge of the known universe
    Posts
    32,417
    > The setting was using the stdafx.h and I was just wondering how to do it otherwise.
    Remove the file from your source, and then goto project->settings. Under compiler or pre-processor, look for "Use precompiled headers" and turn it OFF.

    I don't know what the basic package gets you in terms of header/library support, but to access the win32 API, you need to download and install the "platform SDK".

    Though if you managed to get the usual "hello world" console app to work, then perhaps any console program which goes no further than depending on the STL should work as-is.
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
    I support http://www.ukip.org/ as the first necessary step to a free Europe.

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    7,317
    For VC++ Express, when you create your project select Win32 Console Application. Then in the wizard that appears, switch to the Application Settings page and check the Empty Project checkbox. This will ensure that precompiled headers aren't used and that no other non-standard settings are added.

    If you already have a working prject then you can turn off pre-compiled headers as Salem instructed.

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    9
    if you want to learn GOOD c++, ditch VSExpress. If you absolutely have some platform specific application that you absolutely need the VS compiler, go with versions 6 and lower, basically anything that doesn't say .NET anywhere.

    The best alternative, GCC. You can use any editor you want, and it will teach you to compile from the command-line (a much needed skill in the real world)

    For educational purposes, a nice IDE like DevC++ or Code::Blocks is great. DevC++ uses a port of GCC called MinGW. I loaded Code::Blocks once, it crashed the first time I ran it, never used it again so I can't comment on that.

    I'm not an MS basher, I really like MSVS 6. It makes writing windows apps a snap, I just don't have much use for the VS compiler these days...

  6. #6
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Location
    The edge of the known universe
    Posts
    32,417
    Oh be quiet - the new visual studio express compilers are FAR more compliant as a standard C++ compiler than VC6 is.

    Just because it says .net on the box doesn't force you to use .net features. You can still write nice standard conformant native C++ applications.
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
    I support http://www.ukip.org/ as the first necessary step to a free Europe.

  7. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    9
    Oh be quiet - the new visual studio express compilers are FAR more compliant as a standard C++ compiler than VC6 is.

    Just because it says .net on the box doesn't force you to use .net features. You can still write nice standard conformant native C++ applications.
    Thank You. But I won't be quiet. I didn't say anything about compliance. Anyway, "compiler-compliance" issues are far gone from someone beginning to learn C++. I started my c++ learning using VS (it came on a CD with our text book). There's nothing wrong with it, but I think there's "simpler" IDE's out there better suited to learning basic programming skills (DevC++ or VC6 for example).

    And no matter how much you might advocate VSExpress as such a great standard c++ compiler, by FAR the standard is the GCC.

  8. #8
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    21,310
    Anyway, "compiler-compliance" issues are far gone from someone beginning to learn C++.
    Indeed, hence they should choose a more standard compliant compiler. Simple things like the scope of variables in for loops are not the things that a beginner needs to get confused with, much less when they reach the realm of template programming.

    There's nothing wrong with it, but I think there's "simpler" IDE's out there better suited to learning basic programming skills (DevC++ or VC6 for example).
    Frankly, I think that VS2005 Express interface has been simplified enough, though I have never looked at the Professional version's interface. My concern is not so much which IDE one chooses, but which compiler one chooses. I am not against teaching C++ using the command line and a text editor.

    And no matter how much you might advocate VSExpress as such a great standard c++ compiler, by FAR the standard is the GCC.
    On Windows, MSVC is the de facto standard, but I like the MinGW port of GCC too. Either way, there is no C++ compiler recognised by the C++ Standard (and Stroustrup himself very carefully side steps this), and no C++ compiler fully conforms to the Standard. Still, one should choose something more standard comformant over something pre-standard.
    C + C++ Compiler: MinGW port of GCC
    Version Control System: Bazaar

    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

  9. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    7,317
    >> if you want to learn GOOD c++, ditch VSExpress.

    As long as you create a Win32 Console Application and check the Empty Project option, I think VC++ Express is the best free option available.

    It lets you code standard C++, it uses an excellent compiler and standard library, and has by far a better debugger than any other IDE I've heard of.

Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. msdn
    By wheelie in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-14-2007, 05:53 PM
  2. vc express compiling???
    By code2d in forum C++ Programming
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-06-2006, 12:14 PM
  3. Visual Studio Express for free
    By Frobozz in forum C# Programming
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-29-2006, 09:59 PM
  4. MSDN Searching Tips
    By jverkoey in forum A Brief History of Cprogramming.com
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-19-2004, 04:51 AM
  5. Familar with Outlook Express?
    By Shadow in forum Tech Board
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-22-2004, 01:45 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21