What is the best book for a beginner to learn c++

This is a discussion on What is the best book for a beginner to learn c++ within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi everyone, What is the best book for someone who is new to programming to learn c++. I'm looking for ...

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    What is the best book for a beginner to learn c++

    Hi everyone,
    What is the best book for someone who is new to programming to learn c++. I'm looking for a book that is up to date and does not need you to know how to program in any other language and is simple enough for a beginner. I have looked on Google, and other websites ,but I want to know what you people think. I also want all the examples to work right. Thanks everyone.
    -Curt22

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    Deathray Engineer MacGyver's Avatar
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    The stickied topic at the top of this section of the forums entitled C++ Book Recommendations might be of some use...

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    I have read that. I'm just wondering which one you people think would be the best for me.

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    This is the book that taught myself. It is a beginner book. It willl only teach fundamentals for game programming however. If you wish to learn syntax and some useful strategies it is the book for you. I'd also recommend searching through other libraries. This book also teaches a good deal about STL which is very commonly used by programmers.

    http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-C%2B...3843721&sr=8-6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJFMJR View Post
    This is the book that taught myself. It is a beginner book. It willl only teach fundamentals for game programming however. If you wish to learn syntax and some useful strategies it is the book for you. I'd also recommend searching through other libraries. This book also teaches a good deal about STL which is very commonly used by programmers.

    http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-C%2B...3843721&sr=8-6
    Thanks JJFMJR, but i don't want a book about game programming.

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    I understand, but it will teach you the commonalities of C++ and is a great beginner book. However if you can find a good book not specializing in C++ Game programming feel free to tell me
    My Favorite Programming Line:
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    #define true ((rand() % 2) ? true : false)

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by curt22 View Post
    I'm looking for a book that is up to date and does not need you to know how to program in any other language and is simple enough for a beginner.
    In that case start with something like those "In 21 Days" books or "C++ for Dummies". Just learn the basics and when you are ready give, sell or throw them away (the latter is more fun).

    You want next to buy either C++ Primer 3rd Edition or Accelerated C++ next. (Why not both?). Take time studying these lengthy books and start saving some money.

    Your next buy after those two have had some time on your hands is the obligatory "The C++ Programming Language" and the also obligatory "Effective C++", "More Effective C++" and the "The C++ Standard Library, A Tutorial and Reference".

    That's it. By this time you will know what to do next.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    The book I have started to recommend for complete beginners is You Can Do It! by Francis Glassborow.

    It is fairly new and I have not had much chance to look through it myself, which is why I didn't add it to my list in the stickied thread.

    However, it has some advantages over 95&#37; of the other books available. Basically the advanatages are that it teaches modern C++ style. It uses standard C++ string and vector classes from the beginning, rather than teaching old and C style options that have little use for a beginner.

    If you can find it, I'd try this one first.

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    Hi everyone I decided to buy Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days 5th Edition. when I'm done that I think I'll try some of the other books you recommended.
    Thanks for your recommendations.

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    I am reading C++ For Dummies and I am loving it. It's helping me sooo much!

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    semi-colon generator ChaosEngine's Avatar
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    Sorry but I've read C++ for Dummies (one of my co-workers bought it). It's a terrible book. As Daved says, it teaches old "C style" C++. Avoid like the plague.
    "I saw a sign that said 'Drink Canada Dry', so I started"
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    If you program in C++, you need Boost. You should also know how to use the Standard Library (STL). Want to make games? After reading this, I don't like WxWidgets anymore. Want to add some scripting to your App?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChaosEngine View Post
    Sorry but I've read C++ for Dummies (one of my co-workers bought it). It's a terrible book. As Daved says, it teaches old "C style" C++. Avoid like the plague.

    The 5th addition does??

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    Yes. Even recently published editions of C++ books use C style strings and dynamic arrays where they should probably be teaching the C++ string class and vectors.

    A simple way to check is to look in the "Search inside this book" feature at amazon and go to the index. Lookup string and see whether it refers to arrays, strcpy or null termination on an earlier page than the string class. Or try to find vector in the index. In this case, C++ for Dummies talks about C style strings on page 101 and about the string class in chapter 28 on page 364.

    You might think it is trying to make things simpler for its target audience (being a "for Dummies" book), but really it has that backwards. Using the string class is much easier than using C style strings. If it wants to dumb things down, it would barely give a passing mention to null terminated character arrays.

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    Ok, well I also got,

    Sam's Teach Your Self C++ in 24 Hours, Is that one good??

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    I don't know what changes have been made in the latest edition, but the 3rd edition looks worse than all the other books mentioned so far in terms of the "C style" issues I mentioned.

    There's only five books I've heard of that are introductions to C++ and that appear to use modern C++ style:
    • Accelerated C++ by Koenig and Moo (somewhat accelerated)
    • You Can Do It! by Glassborow (for complete beginners)
    • You Can Program in C++ by Glassborow (for programmers)
    • C++ Primer (4th Edition) by Lippman, Lajoie and Moo (more of a primer/reference than a teaching book)
    • Beginning C++ Game Programming by Dawson (teaches C++ with an eye towards game programming)


    Of course there could be others, but those are the five I'm aware of. Any book you buy you should look inside first. Check the copyright date to see if it is recent. Look in the index to see where vector is explained - is it at the end of the book or in the middle - closer to the beginning is better.

    I understand it is difficult for someone new to C++ to understand what this all means. Unfortunately this flaw is so pervasive in introductory C++ texts that it really limits which books I would consider to be worth trying.

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