Is it possible to pass an array to a function?

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  1. #1
    Registered Abuser Loic's Avatar
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    Question Is it possible to pass an array to a function?

    Is it possible to pass an array to a function?

    For example, I am trying to make a function called displaycards, which will display some cards, but I want it to display the cards from a deck which I have in an array in my “int main()” part of the program.

  2. #2
    Just Lurking Dave_Sinkula's Avatar
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    Yes.

    Can you post the code related to your attempt?
    7. It is easier to write an incorrect program than understand a correct one.
    40. There are two ways to write error-free programs; only the third one works.*

  3. #3
    Registered Abuser Loic's Avatar
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    Some thing like this...
    Code:
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    
    using namespace std;
    
    void displayCards();
    
    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        string Spade[13] = {"A", "2", "3", "4", "5" ,"6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "J", "Q", "K"};
        random_shuffle(Spade, Spade + 13);
            
        cout << "Player 1: \n";
        displayCards();
        
    }
    
    void displayCards()
    {
         for (int i=0; i<=13; i++)
         { cout << "S: "; spade[i]); }
    }

  4. #4
    Just Lurking Dave_Sinkula's Avatar
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    The function displayCards should receive arguments -- generally speaking, the start of the array and its size. And C and C++ are case sensitive.
    7. It is easier to write an incorrect program than understand a correct one.
    40. There are two ways to write error-free programs; only the third one works.*

  5. #5
    Registered Abuser Loic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave_Sinkula View Post
    The function displayCards should receive arguments -- generally speaking, the start of the array and its size. And C and C++ are case sensitive.
    Sorry you lost me?

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    basically, edit the function (and the prototype, of course) so that it takes two arguments: an array of type string, and an integer, to specify the length of the array.

    hope it helps.

  7. #7
    Registered Abuser Loic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nadroj View Post
    basically, edit the function (and the prototype, of course) so that it takes two arguments: an array of type string, and an integer, to specify the length of the array.

    hope it helps.
    something like this?
    Code:
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    
    using namespace std;
    
    void displayCards(string, int);
    
    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        string Spade[13] = {"A", "2", "3", "4", "5" ,"6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "J", "Q", "K"};
        random_shuffle(Spade, Spade + 13);
            
        cout << "Player 1: \n";
        displayCards(Spade, 13);
        
    }
    
    void displayCards(string Spade, int i)
    {
         for (int i=0; i<=13; i++)
         cout << "S: "; Spade[i]);
    }

  8. #8
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    almost.. with that code the function takes in a single string.. you want a string array.

  9. #9
    Registered Abuser Loic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nadroj View Post
    almost.. with that code the function takes in a single string.. you want a string array.
    Ok, so i have this.
    Code:
    void displayCards(string array, int);
    
    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        string Spade[13] = {"A", "2", "3", "4", "5" ,"6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "J", "Q", "K"};
        random_shuffle(Spade, Spade + 13);
            
        cout << "Player 1: \n";
        displayCards(Spade, 13);
        
    }
    
    void displayCards(string array Spade, int i)
    {
         for (int i=0; i<=13; i++)
         cout << "S: "; Spade[i]);
    }
    but i get this error? " conversion from `std::string*' to non-scalar type `std::string' requested "

    sorry if i am being a pain, i tried to look all this up on google, but that just confused me even more... lol

  10. #10
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    you know how to declare a string array, you did it in main! whats this 'array' keyword nonsense!

    KISS! its no different!

    edit: also, in your cout statement in the displayCards function remove the ')' and change the middle ';' to '<<'
    Last edited by nadroj; 05-06-2007 at 09:32 PM.

  11. #11
    Registered Abuser Loic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nadroj View Post
    you know how to declare a string array, you did it in main! whats this 'array' keyword nonsense!

    KISS! its no different!

    edit: also, in your cout statement in the displayCards function remove the ')' and change the middle ';' to '<<'
    ok, so so far i have this

    Code:
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    
    using namespace std;
    
    void displayCards(string Spade);
    
    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        string Spade[13] = {"A", "2", "3", "4", "5" ,"6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "J", "Q", "K"};
        random_shuffle(Spade, Spade + 13);
            
        cout << "Player 1: \n";
        displayCards(Spade[0,13]);
        system("pause");
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }
    
    void displayCards(string Spade)
    {
         for (int i=0; i<=13; i++)
         {
             cout << "S: " << Spade[i];
         }
    }
    it compiles fine, but when i run it i get this.
    This application has requested the Runtime to terminate it in an unusual way.
    Please contact the application's support team for more information.

  12. #12
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    ok, i think ive tortured you enough...

    to declare your array of strings, you did:
    Code:
    string Spade[13]
    string[] is the datatype--that is, its a 'string array'. in your function and prototype, append '[]' to the datatype:
    Code:
    void displayCards(string[] Spade);
    also, i would recommend using lower-case variable names (ie 'spade' not 'Spade') and camel-casing when necessary, as you have ('displayCards'). when i see a capital i think its a class name. my two cents.

  13. #13
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    Even
    Code:
    void displayCards(string Spade[13]);
    would work. It's the same, you are declaring an array of strings, its just that this one is also a parameter to the function.

    One other issue, you should be using < instead of <=. When i = 13, it is out of bounds of a 13 element array (valid indexes are 0 - 12).

  14. #14
    Registered Abuser Loic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nadroj View Post
    ok, i think ive tortured you enough...

    to declare your array of strings, you did:
    Code:
    string Spade[13]
    string[] is the datatype--that is, its a 'string array'. in your function and prototype, append '[]' to the datatype:
    Code:
    void displayCards(string[] Spade);
    also, i would recommend using lower-case variable names (ie 'spade' not 'Spade') and camel-casing when necessary, as you have ('displayCards'). when i see a capital i think its a class name. my two cents.
    ok now i am really ripping my hair out!!!!

    Code:
    void displayCards(string[]);
    
    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        string spade[13] = {"A", "2", "3", "4", "5" ,"6", "7", "8", "9", "10", "J", "Q", "K"};
        random_shuffle(spade, spade + 13);
            
        cout << "Player 1: \n";
        displayCards(spade[0,13]);
        system("pause");
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }
    
    void displayCards(string[13] spade)
    {
         for (int i=0; i<13; i++)
             cout << "S: " << spade[i];
    }
    i get this message from the compiler
    cannot convert `std::string' to `std::string*' for argument `1' to `void displayCards(std::string*)'

  15. #15
    Deathray Engineer MacGyver's Avatar
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    You're making up syntax here.

    What is this?

    Code:
    displayCards(spade[0,13]);
    Should be this:

    Code:
    displayCards(spade);

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