Having trouble actually paying attention (posted in this forum because it involvesC++

This is a discussion on Having trouble actually paying attention (posted in this forum because it involvesC++ within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Whenever I'm five or so minutes into reading any of the C++ Programming lessons (currently on Structures; read the Pointers ...

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    Unhappy Having trouble actually paying attention (posted in this forum because it involvesC++

    Whenever I'm five or so minutes into reading any of the C++ Programming lessons (currently on Structures; read the Pointers lesson a few times but then just continued on), my eyes just start to "wander away" from the screen and I start thinking about completely random stuff; I just can't pay attention to programming. I've tried taking short breaks from programming (i.e. 30-60 minute breaks), and I've tried taking long-term breaks from programming (i.e. 1-3 days of nothing to do with C++ Programming); both being unsuccessful.

    If you have ANY advice at all that could/would help me pay a lot more attention when studying C++ Programming, please post it here. . I really do want to continue programming, and I don't want this issue to keep coming up.
    Last edited by Warrax; 04-29-2007 at 12:29 PM. Reason: Added in the last sentence.

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    I've found that it's futile to spend too much time reading if you don't have the opportunity to program while you're learning - the programming fixes the information in memory. Otherwise, you end up forgetting stuff as fast as you learn it. This is especially important with C++, which is a BIG language. Try to pick a subset which allows you to code something useful and start out using that, and then build on it gradually. You'll probably find that you end up going back and modifying your own code as you learn better ways to do the same thing.
    Last edited by robatino; 04-29-2007 at 12:49 PM.

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    Thanks for the advice; although what exactly do you mean by 'subset'?

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    Just a part of the language that lets you code what you need to. For example, I started learning C++ a year ago. What I'm working on now doesn't require inheritance, strings, or file I/O, among other things, so I don't worry about those for now. It's more effective to first learn what you actually have a chance to use, since using it means it gets into your long-term memory. Of course, you should at least have a vague sense of the other subjects, so if you run across a situation where they will be useful, you can recognize it and then go read up on them.

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    Ok, thanks; anyone else have some advice? I need all the advice I can get =/.

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    Learn by doing small programs you find interesting.
    I started with a file encryptor program (strings, I/O)
    Then I did a homework organizer that made it possible for me to enter homework and the program sorted it after which day it had to be done (sorting)
    After that I tried to do a particle engine(super simple version) it was than I understood why classes was a nice thing.
    Right now I'm doing a raytracer.

    I have always found myself to learn better by doing something a bit harder than what I master, meaning that most of the time I will be debugging and tearing my hair out. But when Im done I feel great and usually have learned a lot.

    Again I have to thank members at this page for great help and support, and for not flaming me even though I probably have deserved it sometimes.

    Ole K

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    as mentioned, the best way to learn is to apply your knowledge (or readings)! for example, try and write a simple console-based 'hangman'. how would you go about doing this?

    having a goal or end-point is (obviously) the most important thing to get you started. but once you have some (practical) task at hand, its easier to focus on it.

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