New to C++ Programming, but is it worth it to learn?

This is a discussion on New to C++ Programming, but is it worth it to learn? within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; The term high level programming is being thrown around alot. C++ is not a high level programming language. C++ is ...

  1. #16
    Captain - Lover of the C
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    The term high level programming is being thrown around alot. C++ is not a high level programming language. C++ is a low level programming language meaning that is closer to machine language than spoken language. BASIC would be considered high level because it is closer to spoken language. C++ is however highly complex which is what I believe many of the posters meant. Windows programming even more complex because it takes all the data structures and organization of C++ and adds the manipulation of windows and controls.

    Personally (18yr old kid no industry experience) , C++ is fine to learn. It contains all the major data types. You can go into depth in everything from data organization to graphics programming. And changing from C++ to another language won't be that difficult. The concepts will stay the same. You will just need to learn slightly different syntax and functions.
    Don't quote me on that... ...seriously

  2. #17
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    I think by "high-level programming" bumcheekcity actually means "programming with graphics", since the contrast was with "little Black-Box-DOS C++".

    C++ is not a high level programming language. C++ is a low level programming language meaning that is closer to machine language than spoken language.
    High and low are relative terms. C++ is a high level programming language as compared to assembly language, especially when you consider the abstractions provided by the C++ standard library. C++ is a low level programming language when compared to programming languages with higher levels of abstraction, especially in the core language.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bjarne Stroustrup (2000-10-14)
    I get maybe two dozen requests for help with some sort of programming or design problem every day. Most have more sense than to send me hundreds of lines of code. If they do, I ask them to find the smallest example that exhibits the problem and send me that. Mostly, they then find the error themselves. "Finding the smallest program that demonstrates the error" is a powerful debugging tool.
    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

  3. #18
    semi-colon generator ChaosEngine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad0407 View Post
    changing from C++ to another language won't be that difficult. The concepts will stay the same. You will just need to learn slightly different syntax and functions.
    This is true. You know it, and I know it.

    Unfortunately the HR/recruitment monkey doesn't. He's been told to find a .net programmer with at least 3 years C# and even though a # looks kinda like '++' squished together, he's done a 2 hour "beginners guide to IT" course and he KNOWS that they're different.

    So he's gonna take the guy with 3 years C# (really 2 years and 4 months, but hey it's close enough) over the guy with 5 years C++.

    Ok, that's an exaggeration. But it's not too far removed from reality. My girlfriend was a recruitment consultant for years.

    She'd get a job request for a J2EE programmer. Being that J2EE programmers are thin on the ground, she sometimes submit a particularly talented C++ or C# programmer, on the basis that a) they'd pick it up quick and b) they were keen to get some J2EE experience. They were always rejected.

    Moral of the story is: you could be Bjarne Stroustrup but if the job says C#, 9 times out of 10 they mean it.
    "I saw a sign that said 'Drink Canada Dry', so I started"
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    Free Compiler: Visual C++ 2005 Express
    If you program in C++, you need Boost. You should also know how to use the Standard Library (STL). Want to make games? After reading this, I don't like WxWidgets anymore. Want to add some scripting to your App?

  4. #19
    Registered User pronecracker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eye in the Sky View Post
    In C# it's something around "form1 = new Form()", but I used Visual Studio with C#, so I never paid attention to how it was structured.
    You're confusing this programmer that is new to C++. If you don't know any C++, don't pretend you do and give wrong answers.

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