Project Layout

This is a discussion on Project Layout within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi, can you guys tell me if this is the right way to write or layout the codes? It's just ...

  1. #1
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    Project Layout

    Hi, can you guys tell me if this is the right way to write or layout the codes? It's just a simple project and I finally got it to work. I just don't know if this is the right way to lay things out...

    Code:
    //SIMPLE CALCULATOR
    
    //In main.cpp
    
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    #include "header2.h"
    using namespace std;
    
    int main(int argc, char *argv[])
    {
        int choice;
        cout << "Please select an option from the menu:\n\n";
        cout << "1. Add\n";
        cout << "2. Subtract\n";
        cout << "3. Multiply\n";
        cout << "4. Divide\n";
        cout << "\nEnter choice:  ";
        cin >> choice;
        cout << "\n\n\n\n";
        switch(choice)
        {
                      case 1:  myFunc();
                           break;
                      case 2:  myFunc2();
                           break;
                      case 3:  myFunc3();
                           break;
                      case 4:  myFunc4();
                           break;
                      default:  cout << "Please select one of the options in the menu.\n";
                                break;
                      }    
        cout << "\n\n\n\n";
        system("PAUSE");
        return EXIT_SUCCESS;
    }
    
    
    //In header2.h
    //This is where I list my functions
    
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    
    int myFunc();
    int myFunc2();
    int myFunc3();
    int myFunc4();
    
    
    
    //In header1.h
    //The class
    
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    
    using namespace std;
    
    class Add
    {
          public:
                 int getAnswer() const {return one + two;}
                 void setAnswer(int a, int b) {one = a, two = b;}
                           
          private:
                  int one;
                  int two;
          };    
         
    class Subtract
    {
         public:
                 int getsubAnswer() const {return subone - subtwo;}
                 void setsubAnswer(int a, int b) {subone = a, subtwo = b;}
                           
          private:
                  int subone;
                  int subtwo; 
          };
    
    class Multiply
    {
         public:
                 int getmultAnswer() const {return multone * multtwo;}
                 void setmultAnswer(int a, int b) {multone = a, multtwo = b;}
                           
          private:
                  int multone;
                  int multtwo; 
          };
    
    class Divide
    {
         public:
                 int getdivAnswer() const {return divtone / divtwo;}
                 void setdivAnswer(int a, int b) {divtone = a, divtwo = b;}
                           
          private:
                  int divtone;
                  int divtwo; 
          };
    
    
    
    //In myFunc.cpp
    //for addition
    
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    #include "header1.h"
    using namespace std;
    
    int myFunc()
    {
        int numbOne, numbTwo;
        
        cout << "Enter a number:  ";
        cin >> numbOne;
        cout << "Enter another number:  ";
        cin >> numbTwo;
        
        Add myAdd;
        myAdd.setAnswer(numbOne, numbTwo);
        cout << "Answer:  " << myAdd.getAnswer() << "\n\n"; 
        
        return 0;
        }
    
    
    
    //In myFunc2.cpp
    //For subtraction
    
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    #include "header1.h"
    using namespace std;
    
    int myFunc2()
    {
        int numbOne, numbTwo;
        
        cout << "Enter a number:  ";
        cin >> numbOne;
        cout << "Enter another number:  ";
        cin >> numbTwo;
        
        Subtract mySubtract;
        mySubtract.setsubAnswer(numbOne, numbTwo);
        cout << "Answer:  " << mySubtract.getsubAnswer() << "\n\n"; 
        
        return 0;
        }
    
    
    
    //In myFunc3.cpp
    //For multiplication
    
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    #include "header1.h"
    using namespace std;
    
    int myFunc3()
    {
        int numbOne, numbTwo;
        
        cout << "Enter a number:  ";
        cin >> numbOne;
        cout << "Enter another number:  ";
        cin >> numbTwo;
        
        Multiply myMultiply;
        myMultiply.setmultAnswer(numbOne, numbTwo);
        cout << "Answer:  " << myMultiply.getmultAnswer() << "\n\n"; 
        
        return 0;
        }
    
    
    
    //In myFunc4.cpp
    //For division
    //here I forgot to set the variables as float - i'll do different next time
    
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <iostream>
    #include "header1.h"
    using namespace std;
    
    int myFunc4()
    {
        int numbOne, numbTwo;
        
        cout << "Enter a number:  ";
        cin >> numbOne;
        cout << "Enter another number:  ";
        cin >> numbTwo;
        
        Divide myDivide;
        myDivide.setdivAnswer(numbOne, numbTwo);
        cout << "Answer:  " << myDivide.getdivAnswer() << "\n\n"; 
        
        return 0;
        }

    I set these codes on separate files and linked them.

    Is this how I should be laying out the codes? And if you find anything to correct, I'd really appreciate it. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    That method seems fine. I might put all the function implementations into a single cpp file instead of separating them.

    You will want to add header include guards to all of your header files, though.

    Also, since your functions do not use the return value, I would make them specify void instead of int as the return type and remove the return statements.

  3. #3
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    Thanks! That really helped. =)

  4. #4
    CSharpener vart's Avatar
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    I actually prefer style
    Code:
    int main()
    {
    	//some statements
    }
    so the open and closing brekets are in the same column - it is easier for me to identify the start and the end of the block. I havn't see the approach where the closing breket is leaved in the indented column as you did.
    The second widly use alternative is like this
    Code:
    int main(){
    	//some statments
    }
    It saves one line but makes for me alittle bit difficult to look for the open breket...
    But also it doesn't hide the closing breket under the block but places it on the previous indentation.

    PS. And tab size is set to 4 in my editor... (so I'm not using spaces to indent the code)
    The first 90% of a project takes 90% of the time,
    the last 10% takes the other 90% of the time.

  5. #5
    CSharpener vart's Avatar
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    What I just noted in your program. Your Subtract class does not have a constructor. What will happen if someone calls getsubAnswer without calling set function?
    I think it is better to provide default constructor setting your members to 0 and maybe the constructor accepting 2 ints, so the class can be constructed and directly used without call the set function...
    The same about other classes
    The first 90% of a project takes 90% of the time,
    the last 10% takes the other 90% of the time.

  6. #6
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    Good point. Given the way the classes are being used, I think that only providing a two argument constructor and no default constructor might be more appropriate.

  7. #7
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    >>I actually prefer style
    Code:
    int main()
    {
    	//some statements
    }

    Thanks! but that is the default indentation layout of DevC++. I also like that kind of style you showed. I'll probably change my settings. I'll also take note of your second suggestion. Actually, honestly, and being a noob, I don't think I fully understand what the Constructor and Destructor is for... but I'll study on it.
    Last edited by lasher; 12-03-2006 at 10:18 PM.

  8. #8
    CSharpener vart's Avatar
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    no default constructor might be more appropriate.
    Till we do not make vectors of the calss object or something calling the default constructor without us realizing it completely...
    I prefer to build the private default constructor in this case so the compiler will announce me if I miss that point in my code
    The first 90% of a project takes 90% of the time,
    the last 10% takes the other 90% of the time.

  9. #9
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    >> I don't think I fully understand what the Constructor and Destructor is for.
    When I mentioned in the other thread that constructors are important even for beginners' classes, this is a good example of what I was talking about. If you or somebody else is using your classes, and you forget to call setAnswer, then the code will compiler but you will get garbage results.

  10. #10
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    Maybe it's because I'm coming from java but I din't like that way. I would use main.cpp for main routine and global functions and than per class one <classname>.h file declaring that class with privat and public members and one <classname>.cpp file with the implementation (skipped in your case because all methods are inline). I guess with that source navigation is much easier in bigger projects.

  11. #11
    and the hat of wrongness Salem's Avatar
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    > Thanks! but that is the default indentation layout of DevC++. I also like that kind of style you showed.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_True_Brace_Style
    Which one you choose is largely a matter of preference.

    So long as you apply your style consistently, then it's all good
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.
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  12. #12
    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    I think there was a thread ages ago on this board about the alignment of braces and it started off as a simple question simular to the above and it turned into a 50 reply debate amongst board members giving their preferences on what style to adapt. Quite an intreeging read I thought.

    PS: Considering it was me who began that thread, I did not mean to begin such a heated debate to0!

    Look back at the older threads to see just how argumentive a simple subject can turn!
    I'm just trying to be a better person - My Name Is Earl

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