Best ways to learn

This is a discussion on Best ways to learn within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi, I'm kind of new to C++. I've once 'learnt' the basics using tutorials, but I can't reallt program anything. ...

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    Best ways to learn

    Hi,

    I'm kind of new to C++. I've once 'learnt' the basics using tutorials, but I can't reallt program anything. Anyhow, I'd like to really learn it good to eventually write some simple games.

    What ways are there to learn C++? I've looked at the books section, and the Series looks good, but at the moment, I can't afford any books. Are there other ways to become a real good C++ programmer?

    yours,
    mg

  2. #2
    すまん Hikaru's Avatar
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    Books are okay for basic stuff, but once you understand those things I think the best way to learn is to look in places like this one at the questions and answers. That way you can see what real programmers think and how they do things. You also can't learn to program without coding anything so write any programs you can think of and test everything you have even the smallest question about.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hikaru
    Books are okay for basic stuff, but once you understand those things I think the best way to learn is to look in places like this one at the questions and answers. That way you can see what real programmers think and how they do things. You also can't learn to program without coding anything so write any programs you can think of and test everything you have even the smallest question about.
    So are you advising to learn the basics, and every time I learn something new, to write write write until I understand it fully and I can create and solve related things by head? And to then move on to the next thing and do the same process?

    Thanks

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    >> I can create and solve related things by head
    You don't have to be able to solving things completely on your own without looking things up, in fact it is good if you are able to look up information to get answers quickly. However, you should get comfortable understanding each concept you learn and how to apply it. This is why practice helps, it provides you multiple slightly different opportunities to apply what you've learned. Each slightly different situation tests whether you really understand what you've learned.

    Books are really best to learn, IMO, so if you can get one (Accelerated C++) to be augmented by online learning that would be best. If not, consider going to a library to find some text to help. Online tutorials are generally less complete and less thorough. There is also one commonly recommended free book online, Thinking in C++ by Eckel.

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    It's very hard to learn without books or classes. Most people who work as programmers have a college degree. Usually it's a Computer Science degree, but degrees in Math, Engineering or other Science are also common. Everything you need to know is online, but at this point you don't know what to look for and you won't know when you've found it! (There's probably enough medical information in the Net to become a Doctor too.)

    Books (or classes) can provide structure, to your study and a path from point A to Point B. Besides that, most tutorials are very abbreviated. You get much more detail and explanation in a book. For example, Accelerated C++ is about 350 pages, and Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days is over 700 pages. Yet, these books cover essentially the same topics as the cprogramming.com tutorials. (All of this detail and explanation are on the Net... Actually, there's more information on the Net, but can you find it????)

    If you must to do it all online, search for tutorials and use them to guide your study. Then, if you need more information on a particular topic, you can search for it.

    Here's another beginning tutorial.

    Here's a good Windows Programing Tutorial.

  6. #6
    For Narnia! Sentral's Avatar
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    Everything is all interconnected. You can basically figure it out yourself without any books or classes. Just look on the internet, look at code, and see how everything flows. It's exactly like math in the sense you need pre-requisites in order to understand the next step. It's not hard at all. I'm only 16 and I could teach myself mostly everything, it's easyyyyyyy!

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Hmm... I'm with Doug. No books, no gain. Books and a good tutor are a sure way to learn C++. The absence of them is halfway to learn how things should not be done. I've learned more in these forums by being corrected on some of my assumptious by more experienced users than on what I could possibly learn from my interpretation of a book text or website tutorial.

    On the other I've learned more on the 4 books I bought than I could possibly learn by reading website tutorials.

    Learning C++ is not easy. Learning the basics may be. But actually learning how to do it right is not.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    I very much agree with both Mario and Doug, but due to the fact that many aspiring programmers are now in the their mid-teens such as myself simply do not have to availability of books, unless of course to get them from public library or sumthing. I myself download E-books, and other things, which wook well but are clearly not a comfortable solution. I use online tutorials in conjuction with my new books, "Accelerated C++", "Wiley's Teach Yourself C++", and "C++ Primer". Those books, I have only had for maybe 3 weeks and have done a TREMENDOUS amount of assisting, and allowing my code to look more structured and that I am moving functions and code blocks around constantly anymore to get everything to work correctly. Also, classes are very beneficial in the fact that you have a professional there to answer yours questions whatever they may be. I am taking C++ I in high school and it helps. Well sorry for the life story

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    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    Programming like many things is best learned through song. I plan on releasing a 10 CD set of C++ programming concepts in soft rock format.
    Sent from my iPad®

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    So let me get this straight. You think it isn't possible to become a decent C++ programmer (for hobby projects, that is - things like simple games and a few applications to test my skills) using only online tutorials? That's a pity.

    Thanks for the replies.

  11. #11
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Yes. That's pretty much it. You ought to buy at least one book eventually.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Noone said it's not possible, but it will certainly be more difficult. I suggest you look at Bruce Eckel's "Thinking in C++", available to download as a free e-book from his website http://mindview.net/Books/TICPP/ThinkingInCPP2e.html

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    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MartijnG
    So let me get this straight. You think it isn't possible to become a decent C++ programmer (for hobby projects, that is - things like simple games and a few applications to test my skills) using only online tutorials?
    It's only possible if your goal as a C++ programmer is to write online tutorials.
    Sent from my iPad®

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    The superhaterodyne twomers's Avatar
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    There are a number of different people on this board, and we all learn best in different ways. For example, I learn best from trying to learn things by doing examples and pushing what I've learnt through them etc, but perhaps someone else would learn best from studying source code (this particularly seems to happen with single posters), or perhaps a third person would learn best with a book.

    You have to learn which suits you best, and go with that.


    >> So let me get this straight. You think it isn't possible to become a decent C++ programmer (for hobby projects, that is - things like simple games and a few applications to test my skills) using only online tutorials?

    It depends. If your lecturer is bad, how can you learn anything?

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    >> You think it isn't possible to become a decent C++ programmer (for hobby projects, that is - things like simple games and a few applications to test my skills) using only online tutorials?

    It is absolutely possible. The point is that it is harder.

    Also, it is perfectably acceptable to start out with online tutorials and forums, and then buy a book a year or two in to your learning.

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