classes

This is a discussion on classes within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; woo,been a while since my last visit,i learned vb .net anyways i was wondering if when your using classes the ...

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    classes

    woo,been a while since my last visit,i learned vb.net anyways i was wondering if when your using classes the entire program should have classes?

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    Yes.

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    The superhaterodyne twomers's Avatar
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    It doesn't have to. I'm not sure if I get what you mean, but if I have a class called MyClass, are you asking whether every variable has to be of that type?

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    What I meant was, if you're going to use classes, your entire program should be object-oriented. For consistancy's sake.

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    holy crap,on extreme vb i need to wait atleast 3 hours for a view..

    well what i mean is that in vb.net everything thats created has its own class

    also are classes something I should use often in my programs

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    If you're familiar with Object Oriented programming, you should use it. Not that C programming is bad, but it can save you a lot of time, and more importantly, it's practices structured programming.

    And yes, there are a lot of people on the C++ forum.

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    The superhaterodyne twomers's Avatar
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    >> And yes, there are a lot of people on the C++ forum.

    And lots of secrets .... but none here

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    lol 91k+ members on vb 21k+ members here i guess this forums just better



    also when should i make a class public?i cant think of a situation where it wouldnt mess up my code..i know i could just use functions but still

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    The superhaterodyne twomers's Avatar
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    [looselyspeaking]A public class is essentially a struct[/looselyspeaking], possibly with functions, even though structs can have functions. If you want to, why not. I prefer to use functions, cause otherwise it breaks encapsulation

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    Quote Originally Posted by lilhawk2892
    lol 91k+ members on vb 21k+ members here i guess this forums just better



    also when should i make a class public?i cant think of a situation where it wouldnt mess up my code..i know i could just use functions but still
    I don't use private that much, but use private whenever you need to protect a special variable.... especially if you know it won't be needed very much by other functions. For everything else, use public.

    [offtopic]twomers, do you like my new signature? [/offtopic]

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    The superhaterodyne twomers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeprogrammer
    [offtopic]twomers, do you like my new signature? [/offtopic]
    I'm glad to see the trend has caught on. I always check people's posts and sigs now! It's compulsive! Shame smilies don't work with it though Better put in something to do with the thread ...
    [ontopic]>>For everything else, use public.

    I don't know, isn't the point of the private space encapsulation??[/ontopic]
    Last edited by twomers; 08-03-2006 at 07:53 PM.

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    The Richness... Richie T's Avatar
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    My current concept of basic encapsulation is that the class should contain all
    data and methods it needs, and nothing else - code outside the class should
    not "need" to directly access internal data/private methods. Of course, there
    are circumstances when access needs to be given (perhaps it will be more
    efficient), so we have the friend access mechanism. This obviously doesn't go
    into inheritance, but you get the idea.

    >>if you're going to use classes, your entire program should be object-oriented.
    For consistancy's sake.

    Well there's consistancy and there's beating a dead horse - C++ gives you the
    option of using OOP, but it isn't always the best solution - some aspects of a
    program may be well represented by a class, and others might be more
    cumbersome - the trick is to be able to look at your program goals and at each
    particular task, and decide whether you need to use a class, and that it only
    learned with experience. If you want to focus on that, then try writing some
    programs using just functions (C style), and rewriting using OOP. Compare the
    code and look at which representation of the task is best.
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    semi-colon generator ChaosEngine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeprogrammer
    What I meant was, if you're going to use classes, your entire program should be object-oriented. For consistancy's sake.
    sorry, but I disagree quite strongly. Use whatever paradigm fits the problem you are trying to solve. Most of the best C++ programmers actually use a combination of object-oriented, generic and functional programming.

    Some things are better suited as free functions. As an example, have a look at the STL's algorithm functions (e.g. sort(), find(), for_each(), etc). The "traditional" OO approach would've been to declare a base "container" type with sort, find and for_each methods. Instead these are generalised free functions that allow you to use any type that conforms to the interface. Which allows you to use your own container with these functions or even use a C array!

    In short, use classes where appropriate.
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