Dev-C++ -> Tools - > Editor -> Syntax

This is a discussion on Dev-C++ -> Tools - > Editor -> Syntax within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Hi (again). In Dev-C++ -> Tools -> Editor Options -> Syntax, you can modifie the colors of indentifiers, symbols, reserved ...

  1. #1
    Banned Yuri2's Avatar
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    Dev-C++ -> Tools - > Editor -> Syntax

    Hi (again).
    In Dev-C++ -> Tools -> Editor Options -> Syntax, you can modifie the colors of indentifiers, symbols, reserved words and etc.
    My question is if you can change the strings where the editor reacts on of the reserved words.
    Normally like 'int', 'char', 'if' etc. will turn bold but I am wondering of you can change the strings where it reacts to.
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Unfortunately not with Dev-C++. I've once looked through the files installed and there doesn't seem to be anything either. It seems to be hardcoded into dev-c++ executable.

    CodeBlocks offer that functionality, if you must have it.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    I don't think I understand by "change the strings where the editor reacts on". I'm going to guess you mean changing the actual keyword string. As in... you can change int to integer. The answer to that is of course, no. Keywords are standard so they don't conflict with identifiers, functions, and class names. If you made them whatever you wanted and pasted someone else's code, their identifiers might conflict with your custom keywords.
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  4. #4
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    I believe he means adding user defined keywords
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  5. #5
    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    What the hell is a user defined keyword? All "keyword" means is it's reserved by the language. So user defined keyword means what exactly? You want to make up words that you can't use as identifiers?
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  6. #6
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    If you want to color code your user-defined objects and namespaces for instance.
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  7. #7
    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    You can... they're called identifers. It's in the list of syntax. Select it and change the color to whatever you want.
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    Banned Yuri2's Avatar
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    Well for example: If I want to use 'Integer' instead standard 'int', I could do it like this, I do think though that it shouldn't be used:

    PHP Code:
    # define Integer int 

  9. #9
    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    That's not the editor, that's in the code. There is nothing wrong with that if you like it, really... but changing the way the editor displays reserved words is a different story.
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  10. #10
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yuri
    # define Integer int
    Yes. That's ugly. Even though windows libraries are renowned for using such defines.

    CodeBlocks allows you to change those colors since you can edit the list of reserved words
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  11. #11
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlyMaelstrom
    That's not the editor, that's in the code. There is nothing wrong with that if you like it, really... but changing the way the editor displays reserved words is a different story.
    Lol! Why exactly?

    It's a matter of taste, don't you agree? No rules are being broken. Some people do find it easy to change the list of reserved words so that they can specify their own. It doesn't alter the rules of the language, just the way the editor display these words.

    Why do you think so many editors offer this functionality?
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  12. #12
    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    Yes it does alter the rules of the language. If I wanted to change the reserved int data type to the foo data type... almost any code example in the history of coding would end up conflicting.
    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    
    foo main() {
       foo foo = 10;
       std::cout << "This is the number 10: " << foo;
    }
    Now depending on how your silly implementation works, you'll either end up changing all the instances of foo back to int or it will just leave it all as foo. Either way, the compiler is going to complain that your using a reserved word as an identifier.

    We're not talking about color or font here Mario, we're talking about THE ACTUAL WORD. Changing this is not offered in any legitimate C++ compiler.
    Sent from my iPad®

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    Banned Yuri3's Avatar
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    Well:
    PHP Code:
    # define Integer int 
    Is something like this, right?
    PHP Code:
    typedef int Intgerer 
    Ok, now asume you attempt the first code, the define code, with all C++ standard keywords.
    For example:
    PHP Code:
    # define Boolean bool
    # define Character char
    # define Integer int
    ...
    # define If if 
    At my Dev-C++ compiler it bolds the keywords , but if I define it like above I can use my
    own keywords but my own keywords are not bolded out by the compiler,
    logical, because they are not standard.

  14. #14
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Hi (again).
    In Dev-C++ -> Tools -> Editor Options -> Syntax, you can modifie the colors of indentifiers, symbols, reserved words and etc.
    My question is if you can change the strings where the editor reacts on of the reserved words.
    Normally like 'int', 'char', 'if' etc. will turn bold but I am wondering of you can change the strings where it reacts to.
    Sly, this is the OP question.

    Now... what part of it don't you understand?
    The programmer’s wife tells him: “Run to the store and pick up a loaf of bread. If they have eggs, get a dozen.”
    The programmer comes home with 12 loaves of bread.


    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  15. #15
    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    You have to bolden all of your identifiers. That can yield ugly code, though. Check codeblocks and see if they offer more options as to what exactly your enboldening, but I'm not sure they'll give you too many more options. To most compilers an identifer is an identifer, regardless of whether it's a type definition or a variable name or whatever.
    Sent from my iPad®

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