Problems in a game program

This is a discussion on Problems in a game program within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Well, it isn't really good enough to be considered an actual game - it's just a battleship and rocketship program ...

  1. #1
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    Problems in a game program

    Well, it isn't really good enough to be considered an actual game - it's just a battleship and rocketship program I made for a teacher last December (in Pascal) to enter guesses for the location and display the distance from the guess to the actual location. For extra credit that I desperately need in my Visual C++ class (stupid teacher >:/), I began to reprogram this in C++.

    After finding out that I couldn't do graphics like I had wanted to, I just went to using output and ASCII art to make something display. Except it won't display, as it doesn't make it through the compiler.

    I've got three problems with it: The arrays used for the coordinates, this funky loop, and it seems to have a beef with my coordinate-generating function for the rocketship. (3 variables.)

    Ok, first, the arrays.

    I had written it to use arrays as the coordinate values, to simplify on the number of variables. So I have four arrays: Two boolean two-dimensional arrays, for the battleship's actual coordinates and the guess for the battleship's coordinates, then two boolean three-dimensional arrays for the rocket's coordinates and the guess for the rocket coordinates. But no matter how I try I can't get them to cooperate with the compiler... their use with the functions is what's going wonky. Here's the relevant array code:

    Code:
    //Define the boolean values
    const int True = 1;
    const int False = 0;
    
    //Define the arrays for the grid
    const int GRID_SIZE = 10;
    
    typedef bool list_BSCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE];
    list_BSCoords BSCoords;
    typedef bool list_BSGuessCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE];
    list_BSGuessCoords BSGuessCoords;
    
    typedef bool list_RSCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE];
    list_RSCoords RSCoords;
    typedef bool list_RSGuessCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE];
    list_RSGuessCoords RSGuessCoords;
    
    void BSrng(bool BScoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE], int &XCoord, int &YCoord);
    void RSrng(bool RScoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE], int &XCoord, int &YCoord, int&ZCoord);
    This is where it errors, the calling of the function, where it either gives a syntax error if X isn't there, and a can't convert 'bool' to 'bool'(*)[10] error if there is something there:
    Code:
    bool X; //Dummy variable to call the function
       X = 0;
    
       BSrng(BSCoords[X] [X], XCoord, YCoord); //randomize the battleship coordinates
    Code:
    BSrng(bool BSCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE], int &XCoord, int &YCoord);
    {	//Seed the random  numbers
    	time_t seconds;
    
    	time(&seconds);
    	srand((unsigned int) seconds);
    
    	//Assign random values for the coordinates
    	XCoord = rand() % (High - Low + 1) + Low;
    	YCoord = rand() % (High - Low + 1) + Low;
    
    	//"Input" corresponding coordinates into the array
    	BSCoords[XCoord] [YCoord] = True;
    }
    And then, it's giving me all kinds of wierd errors within this do while loop in the battleship's game function:

    Code:
    do
       { 	cout << "X Coordinate?" << endl;
       	cin >> XGuess; //read in an X-coordinate guess
          cout << "Y Coordinate?" << endl;
          cin >> YGuess; //read in a Y-coordinate guess
    		BSGuessCoords[XGuess] [YGuess] = True; //Assign corresponding array to hit
          If ((XGuess == 0) && (YGuess == 0))
          	quit = True;
          Else If (BSGuessCoords[XGuess] [YGuess] && BSCoords[XGuess][YGuess])
          {	cout << "You sunk my battleship!" << endl;
            cout << "It took you " << counter << " tries to hit my battleship." << endl;
          }
          Else
          {  ++counter;
          	distance = sqrt((XCoord - XGuess)^2 + (YCoord - YGuess)^2)
             cout << "You missed me by " << setiosflags(ios::showpoint|ios::fixed)
             	<< setprecision(2) << distance << endl;
          }
       } while (!exit);
    The errors are as follows:
    Call to undefined function 'If' (statement line with if requires
    Undefined symbol 'Else' (statment line with else requires
    do statement must have while.

    And finally, the rocket function coordinate generator:

    Code:
    RSrng(bool RSCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE], int &XCoord, int &YCoord, int &ZCoord);
    { 	//Seed the random  numbers
    	time_t seconds;
    
    	time(&seconds);
    	srand((unsigned int) seconds);
    
    	//Assign random values for the coordinates
    	XCoord = rand() % (High - Low + 1) + Low;
    	YCoord = rand() % (High - Low + 1) + Low;
    	ZCoord = rand() % (High - Low + 1) + Low;
    
    	//"Input" corresponding coordinates into the array
    	RSCoords[XCoord] [YCoord] [ZCoord] = True;
    }
    Expression syntax on the function's header line
    Undefined symbol 'ZCoord' (which I had declared exactly as all the others in the rocket function) and
    Compound statement missing } at the end of the function.

    Please, someone help me out here... I hope so very much that it isn't anything serious, and that I can get it done before Thursday... (Teacher doesn't have the slightest clue why it's not working)

  2. #2
    The Richness... Richie T's Avatar
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    >>(Teacher doesn't have the slightest clue why it's not working)

    The following has often been said, but I think that this is the most
    appropriate case for this I have ever encountered - "Get a new
    teacher." There are some pretty fundamental errors in your code,
    and if your teacher didn't spot anything, then he/she either never
    looked at it, or doesn't know C++ in the first place, either way
    they are not in a position to teach IMO.

    First things first - C++ is a case sensitive language, therefore
    "If" is not the same as "if". that explains these two errors:

    >>Call to undefined function 'If'
    >>Undefined symbol 'Else'

    these should be "if" and "else".

    Next up, we have the first thing I spotted:

    Code:
    //Define the boolean values
    const int True = 1;
    const int False = 0;
    no need to do this - as already mentioned, C++ is case sensitive,
    and the slightly different words "true" and "false" are actually
    part of the language (with the appropriate values as well).

    As for the other error regarding the do.. while, well that seems to
    be in order, perhaps the error is elsewhere in the code, or is
    being produced by the other errors.

    Next we have this function:

    Code:
    BSrng(bool BSCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE], int &XCoord, int &YCoord); // should have no semicolon here
    {	//Seed the random  numbers
    	time_t seconds;
                    .
                    .
                    .
    }
    You have the same mistake in the RSrng function.

    Next we have seeding the random number generator - you
    should only do that once in your program, as opposed to seeding
    every time you call a specific function - just include the following
    line in your main function and don't worry about it thereafter:

    Code:
    srand (time (0));
    [EDIT] - See my following post for correction to this!!!
    Now back to that function - this parameter is illegal:
    "bool BSCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE],"

    There should be nothing in between the [] when declaring an
    array parameter. Accordingly, calling the function in this manner:

    BSrng(BSCoords[X] [X], XCoord, YCoord);

    the BSCoords[X] [X] is actually passing the value stored at the
    location [X] [X] in the array, not the array itself.

    Lastly, I'm not exactly sure as to what you are trying to do here:

    Code:
    typedef bool list_BSCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE];
    list_BSCoords BSCoords;
    typedef bool list_BSGuessCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE];
    list_BSGuessCoords BSGuessCoords;
    
    typedef bool list_RSCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE];
    list_RSCoords RSCoords;
    typedef bool list_RSGuessCoords[GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE] [GRID_SIZE];
    list_RSGuessCoords RSGuessCoords;
    I think you should avoid using typedef in this manner, I'm not
    even sure that it's legal, but I'm guessing that it isn't. I think
    you should just scrap any typedefs and declare your arrays in
    a more typical fashion

    >>I hope so very much that it isn't anything serious, and that I
    can get it done before Thursday

    My guess is you are not that familiar with C++, and you have most
    likely made more mistakes than these which may be revealed as
    you fix these errors, but with some help you will probably be able
    to get this running for Thursday.
    Last edited by Richie T; 06-07-2006 at 01:27 PM.
    No No's:
    fflush (stdin); gets (); void main ();


    Goodies:
    Example of fgets (); The FAQ, C/C++ Reference


    My Gear:
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    IDE - MS Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition


    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI

  3. #3
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    Ok yes, thank you for pointing out those errors. Yeah, I'd love to get a new C++ teacher (we all would), but sadly that decision is out of our hands, as he's the only one in the school.

    I know a little C++... it's a semester class. But that kind of capitalization thing is typical of me - I mess up all the time like that in math. Actually, I believe I ended up doing that was because we'd not had much to program in these past few weeks, aside from that last one that gave me trouble pausing it at the end... I kinda forgot about the non-capitalization; I think I was thinking of VB syntax there - capitalize stuff.

    So now it's just the arrays that need work.

    Where is the proper place to declare the arrays? Because in the function declaration, without the GRID_SIZE in the brackets, these are the errors I get:
    Size of the type 'bool[]' is unknown or zero or Size of the type 'bool[][]' is unknown or zero (in function declaration and anywhere in the functions)
    Expression syntax (in calling the functions)
    Type mismatch in redeclaration of 'BSrng(bool (*)[], int &, int &)'
    Type mismatch in redeclaration of 'RSrng(bool (*)[10][]. int &, int &, int &'

    According to the book we use, with two-dimensional arrays, the first dimension should be defined in the function declaration. Extending that idea out to three dimensions, I'd define the first two dimensions. Except when I do that, it still returns errors of the type 'bool[]' unknown or zero - just less of them than otherwise.

  4. #4
    The Richness... Richie T's Avatar
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    I was wrong about how to pass the arrays, but I've done a little
    research and I've come up with this quick example:

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include <ctime>
    
    #define ROWS 10
    #define COLS 5
    
    using namespace std;
    
    void Print2d (int arr[][COLS], const int x, const int y);
    
    int main (void)
    {
    	int my2d [ROWS][COLS];
    
    	srand (time (0));
    
    	for (int i = 0; i < ROWS; i++)
    	{
    		for (int j = 0; j < COLS; j++)
    		{
    			my2d [i][j] = rand () % 10; //just for something to look at
    		}
    	}
    
    	Print2d (my2d, ROWS, COLS);
    
    	return 0;
    }
    
    void Print2d (int arr[][COLS], const int rows, const int cols)
    {
    	for (int i = 0; i < rows; i++)
    	{
    		for (int j = 0; j < cols; j++)
    		{
    			cout << arr [i][j] << " ";
    		}
    		cout << endl;
    	}
    }
    The same logic should apply to larger dimensions of arrays. Hope
    this clarifies the matter, it does for me anyway - I've editted my
    previous post to highlight this point.

    As for your teacher, poor teachers are a fact of life unfortunately,
    but in cases like this you are better ignoring much of what your
    teacher tells you until you can confirm the information from a
    more reliable source!
    No No's:
    fflush (stdin); gets (); void main ();


    Goodies:
    Example of fgets (); The FAQ, C/C++ Reference


    My Gear:
    OS - Windows XP
    IDE - MS Visual C++ 2008 Express Edition


    ASCII stupid question, get a stupid ANSI

  5. #5
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    NOTE: I wonder, now that the code errors are fixed, that this should be moved to the games board?

    Yay! Thank you so much for your help, I've got it working now!

    Well, ALMOST working. In a run through the program, once the coordinates are guessed, then in any subsequent runs through the SAME coordinates are there. So say I enter 5,5 and it says I'm 3 off. I enter 4, 6 and I get it. I play again, enter 4, 6 and hit it. Testing this further, I would enter 5, 5 and get 3.16 away and 4, 6 still works. Enter 5, 5 again and I'd get 4.64, enter 4, 6 and it still counts it as a hit.

    I think it's something to do with the value of the boolean array - originally, I notice now I had no reset to the array, and now it accepts the same values for it.

    I have it set up where both the guess array and the coordinate array are reset if the user quits or if the user gets it right, but that still doesn't work...

    EDIT: Here's the code where it evaluates if the guess coordinates and the actual coordinates are both the same, and thus a hit.

    Code:
    do
       {  do
       	{	cout << "X Coordinate?" << endl;
       		cin >> XGuess; //read in an X-coordinate guess
          } while ((XGuess < 0) || (XGuess > 10)); //protect from invalid entries
          do
          {	cout << "Y Coordinate?" << endl;
          	cin >> YGuess; //read in a Y-coordinate guess
          } while ((YGuess < 0) || (XGuess > 10)); //protect from invalid entries
    		BSGuessCoords[XGuess][YGuess] = true; //Assign corresponding array to hit
          ++counter; //there's been another guess at the coordinates
          if ((XGuess == 0) && (YGuess == 0))
          {	quit = true;
          	cout << "My battleship was located at: (" << XCoord << ", " << YCoord
             	<< ")." << endl;
    
    		   //Reset old coordinates and guess
    		   BSCoords[XCoord][YCoord] = false;
             BSGuessCoords[XGuess][YGuess] = false;
          }
          else if (BSGuessCoords[XGuess][YGuess] && BSCoords[XGuess][YGuess])
          {	cout << "You sunk my battleship!" << endl;
            	cout << "It took you " << counter << " tries to hit my battleship." << endl;
            	quit = true;
    
    		   //Reset old coordinates and guess
    		   BSCoords[XCoord][YCoord] = false;
             BSGuessCoords[XGuess][YGuess] = false;
          }
          else
          {  distance = (XCoord - XGuess)*(XCoord - XGuess)+(YCoord - YGuess)*(YCoord - YGuess);
          	distance = sqrt(distance);
             cout << "You missed me by " << setiosflags(ios::showpoint|ios::fixed)
             	<< setprecision(2) << distance << endl;
             //Reset the guess's validation
             BSGuessCoords[XGuess][YGuess] = false;
          }
       } while (!quit);
    The code is basically the same for the Rocket function, with the array names changed and the size of the array expanded to 3 dimensions.
    Last edited by ChronoSquare; 06-08-2006 at 09:43 AM.

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