Array initializing

This is a discussion on Array initializing within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; hi all, Code: #include <iostream> using namespace std; class A { public: int i; A(int i):i(i) { cout<<"A created "<<i<<endl; ...

  1. #1
    char main() RoshanX's Avatar
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    Mar 2003
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    68

    Array initializing

    hi all,

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    using namespace std;
    
    class A
    {
            public:
            int i;
            A(int i):i(i)
            {
    
                    cout<<"A created "<<i<<endl;
            }
            ~A()
            {
                    cout<<" A Destroyed "<<i<<endl;
            }
            A()
            {
                    cout<<"A() called"<<endl;
            }
    };
    
    class B:public A
    {
            public:
                    B(int j):A(j)
                    {
                            cout<<"B created "<<i<<endl;
                    }
                    B(){ cout <<" B() called"<<endl;}
                    ~B()
                    {
                            cout<<" B distroyed "<<i<<endl;
                    }
              };
    
    int main()
    {
            A a(100);
            B b(200);
            A j[] = {A(1),B(2)};
            return 0;
    }
    the output of this would be

    A created 100
    A created 200
    B created 200
    A created 1
    A created 2
    B created 2
    B distroyed 2
    A Destroyed 2
    A Destroyed 2
    A Destroyed 1
    B distroyed 200
    A Destroyed 200
    A Destroyed 100

    can anyone tell me , how the distructor of B is called, after the initializationg ( A(int) is called, and then when creating B, A(int) is first called, and then B(int), which I understood, what I can't understand is why ~B() is called right after this)

    Thank you in advance
    First there was God. He was quite lonely, so he created Dennis.
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    So, . . . God created Brian..........Khan Klatt
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  2. #2
    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    Destructors are called first on the last things created. Look at the order of your destructors. It's the exact opposite of your constructor order.

    The program's memory is a stack. First In, Last Out.
    Last edited by SlyMaelstrom; 03-23-2006 at 02:43 PM.
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  3. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    65
    Code:
    > A j[] = {A(1),B(2)};
    This is the same as
    Code:
    A j[] = {A(1),A(B(2))};
    Note that an object of B is created to initialize an object of A and then promptly thrown away. If you printed something from A's copy constructor you would get the following for the A(B(2)) -part:

    ...
    A created 2
    B created 2
    A copy created 2
    B distroyed 2
    A Destroyed 2
    A Destroyed 2
    ...

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