explaination of code

This is a discussion on explaination of code within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; hi everyone this is the code i dont understand and the output is 24.... so can someone show me working ...

  1. #1
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    Question explaination of code

    hi everyone

    this is the code i dont understand and the output is 24.... so can someone show me working and example of the process..thank you

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include <cstdlib>
    using namespace std;
    
    
    int main()
    {
    const int MAX = 6;
    int arr[MAX];
    int count;
    int temp;
    for(count = 0; count<MAX; count++)
    arr[count] = count+1;
    for(count = 0; count<(MAX/2); count++)
    {
    temp = arr[count];
    arr[count] = arr[MAX - (count + 1)];
    arr[MAX - (count + 1)] = temp;
    }
    for(count = 0; count<MAX ; count++)
    temp = temp + arr[count];
    cout<<temp<<" ";
    system("pause");
    return 0;
    }//end main

  2. #2
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    67 posts and no ever told you to indent your code properly?

    so can someone show me working and example of the process..thank you
    Get a pencil and paper. Across the top of the paper write the headings:
    Code:
    MAX    count    temp   arr[MAX]: arr[0]  arr[1]..  .arr[MAX-1]
    Then, step through the code and write down the corresponding values under the headings. When a variable is assigned a new value, cross out the old value and write down the new value underneath it.

  3. #3
    Devil's Advocate SlyMaelstrom's Avatar
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    The beauty of programming is just like any spoken language, if you learn the vocabulary and grammar syntax, you can read through it character by character, line by line.

    'sept there is alot more skipping around.... ok maybe this is somewhat untrue, but in the case of your code, it is.
    Sent from my iPad®

  4. #4
    and the hat of int overfl Salem's Avatar
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    Perhaps learning to indent code would help you understand what bits of code get executed inside which loops.

  5. #5
    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    If you use a Microsoft Compiler, it indents for you. In the case of Dev C++, the older versions especialy, it has no identation help at all.

    A good example of good indent is as follows:

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    
    using std::cout;
    using std::endl;
    
    // main function
    
    int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
    {
    	// declare two integer variables using one line
    
    	int length, height;
    
    	// assign lengh and height values
    
    	height = 7;
    	length = 10;
    
    	// display result to screen by multiplying the variables after the cout statement
    
    	cout << "Total area is: " << length * height << endl;
    
    	getchar();	// freeze output
    
    	return 0;	// indicate sucsessful termination
    }

  6. #6
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    You should place a breakpoint in your code then step through it one step at a time and see which variables get which value on the bottom, or at least Visual Studio does it.

  7. #7
    chococoder
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    Quote Originally Posted by swgh
    If you use a Microsoft Compiler, it indents for you. In the case of Dev C++, the older versions especialy, it has no identation help at all.
    No, that's the editor that's doing the indentation.
    C++ compilers (like all compilers except Python AFAIK) actually remove all indentation and other formating

  8. #8
    pwns nooblars
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    What I would do (and do do when debugging code that isn't responding how I would like it) is cout all the variables as they are modified. Add a cout at the start, then right after when ever anything is changed, that way you can see how the numbers are changing... one thing to remember is to show the names too like
    Code:
    cout<<"var count: " << count << endl;
    but that is just my suggestion.

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