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C++ Book Recommendations

This is a discussion on C++ Book Recommendations within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; It may not be exactly what you want, but Bjarne Stroustrup's " The C++ Programming Language " is quite readable ...

  1. #76
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    It may not be exactly what you want, but Bjarne Stroustrup's "The C++ Programming Language" is quite readable [vs for example K&R's "The C programming language", which I find a bit "tougher" to digest], goes well into the philosophy of the language, giving practical advice and of course describing the language in detail. It may not be the BEST teaching material, but if you are serious about learning C++ and using the language, you probably want to have this book in your library anyways at some point in time, so why not now?

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    Registered User LowWaterMark's Avatar
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    Matas, thanks for taking the time to reply. Actually, I am considering the book you suggested, mostly because of its author. I'm curious if in your opinion it is more of a reference than a teaching text. At over 1000 pages would a novice like myself be getting in over his head? I'm an academic so big books don't scare me (well, occasionally they do) but I fear becoming lost in the forest for the trees, so to speak.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LowWaterMark View Post
    Matas, thanks for taking the time to reply. Actually, I am considering the book you suggested, mostly because of its author. I'm curious if in your opinion it is more of a reference than a teaching text. At over 1000 pages would a novice like myself be getting in over his head? I'm an academic so big books don't scare me (well, occasionally they do) but I fear becoming lost in the forest for the trees, so to speak.
    I think it is 1000 pages because it explains a lot of things. It is more of a reference than a teaching book, but it's not a "bad" type of reference book for the purpose of learning, if you see what I mean.

    The other C++ book I have is a "C++ for Programmers", which is intended to teach C++ to people who have a decent understanding of programming already. By the sounds of things, I'd say that you have SOME experience of programming, but it may not be sufficient to go for that sort of book [never mind that I couldn't find the book I've got in Amazon].

    Edit: I had to look it up, but Koenig & Moo's "Accelerated C++" is probably the best "beginners" book. That would be the book I'd recommend as a companion to Stroustrup.

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    Last edited by matsp; 08-11-2008 at 05:02 AM.
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  4. #79
    Registered User LowWaterMark's Avatar
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    Cool. Again, thank you.

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    Registered User LowWaterMark's Avatar
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    Please, are there any other people with recommendations?

    Take care.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LowWaterMark View Post
    Please, are there any other people with recommendations?

    Take care.
    Well, there is about 6 pages of book comments in this thread, so I expect those that have something to say on the subject already has done. Yes, new books come out, and sometimes people change their mind.

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    >> I'm in search of an introductory text on C++ Programming that approaches its task from a
    >> theoretical or philosophical perspective.

    I don't know any C++ books that specifically take this perspective. Amongst all books I think your choices are good.

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    Registered User LowWaterMark's Avatar
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    Daved, thank you for your reply.

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    Quote Originally Posted by matsp View Post
    I think it is 1000 pages because it explains a lot of things. It is more of a reference than a teaching book, but it's not a "bad" type of reference book for the purpose of learning, if you see what I mean.
    I guess I disagree. I think TC++PL is a heck of a teaching book, with a ton of great insight into concepts and philosophy. To be sure, it is a reference, but I think it is more of a textbook. Particularly the Special Edition with Appendix E on exception safety, which is gold IMO.

    I'd highly recommend it if you want to learn some "why" with the "what and how." A good companion would also be The Design and Evolution of C++.

    For my recommendation in general, I would say Standard C++ IOStreams and Locales by Langer and Kreft for advanced programmers.

  10. #85
    Hail to the king, baby. Akkernight's Avatar
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    Why can't someone make a way to learn C++ for those who hate to read? :P
    Currently research OpenGL

  11. #86
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    Because people who hate to read make bad programmers.
    All the buzzt!
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  12. #87
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    Because it never works that way?
    Usually, stuff enter your left ear and goes straight out of the right ear.
    You have to make notes to remember... but then you would have to read.
    And a book can serve as future reference if and when you forget.

    It's simply the way we and the world works, I'm afraid.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    Yeah, yeah I know :P Just the reading doesn't end! >.<
    No pain, no gain :P
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    Just be glad that there are books and other documentation on just about anything you may want to do. It's actually one of the better things about programming.

  15. #90
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    Let's look forward to the day when we can implant memory chips into our brain so we absorb everything that is said and can download information to it and access it at will!
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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